Thinking about Ideas in Nursing: 13th Philosophy in the Nurse’s World/23rd International Philosophy of Nursing Society Conference

Welcome to Jessica Dillard-Wright, who has now joined our
Nursology.net blogging team!
Jessica is a founding member of the
Nursing Theory Collective and
currently a PhD Student at Augusta University (Georgia)

I knew I was going to love Moby-Dick when I read the line, “Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; […] especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people’s hats off – then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can” (Melville, 1851/1953, p. 17). And I did love it, still do. Sometimes the hypos get the upper hand of me, too, in particular when I am mired in the politics of nursing and education (not to mention the state of affairs we find ourselves in more broadly in the United States). This is especially the case when my ideas feel a couple of standard deviations outside the nursing norm. And then I find my way toward the niches and corners where other nurse dissidents reside and it’s like being at sea. 

The 13th Philosophy in the Nurse’s World/23rd International Philosophy of Nursing Society Conference was held August 18-20, 2019 in Victoria, B.C., a glorious coastal town IPONSlogothat satisfies the seaward impulse and welcomes a conference full of nursing philosophers. Dr. Thomas Foth’s opening plenary on the evening of the 18th softened my perioral grimness, asking us to contemplate the disciplinary apparatuses imposed through humanitarian efforts, focusing specifically on Canadian harm reduction and safe injection efforts for intravenous drug users. Here, Foth made the case that such humanitarian efforts paradoxically perpetuate individualist downstream interventions while failing to address structural inequalities. To this end, humanitarian efforts then shore up the neoliberal state, which in turn reproduces individual inequality and suffering. Foth concluded that the way forward for nursing was political action, oriented toward structural solutions to eliminate the foundations of human suffering. 

The question of politics was picked up in the second plenary session on the morning of the 19th, delivered by Dr. Sally Thorne. Thorne advanced a discussion of Carper’s ways of knowing in which she critiqued the dimension of personal ways of knowing. Thorne cited anti-science views held and advanced by some individual nurses, using anti-vaccination beliefs. Thorne urged nurses to develop a collective set of priorities and to use these priorities as a way to advance nursing writ large in an effort to avoid getting mired in individual nurses’ politics and beliefs. Following Thorne’s plenary, the concurrent sessions began.

In Dr. Kylie Smith’s collaboration with Foth on nursing history as philosophy, my soul found further refuge as Smith unpacked the complex legacy of nursing, the notion of care, and the work required for nurses to contribute to health equity and social justice. This marked another commonality in the concurrent sessions, which explored the hidden and suppressed stories of nursing, including the history of nursing, the colonialist and racist narratives housed within nursing’s assumptions, and the connection of nursing to greater social, cultural, and global challenges like climate injustice, enforced ignorance, and the impact of capitalism.

The critical thread that kicked off the conference was again picked up in a remarkable series of papers in the final concurrent session Dr. Marilou Gagnon first gave a concept analysis of the notion of “whistleblowing” in nursing, unpacking the complexity and muddiness of the concept. This was followed by Dr. Amelie Perron’s talk on the effects of ignorance and knowledge in nursing, advancing the idea of whistleblowing as an act of “epistemic disobedience,” challenging hegemonic order in nursing and healthcare systems. Together, Gagnon and Perron are directing the Nursing Observatory, a project focused on analyzing, acting, amplifying critical perspectives in Canadian nursing. The closing plenary was delivered by Dr. Janet Rankin, an empirical analysis of the “ruling forces” that shape nursing practice as nursing becomes increasingly technologically-dependent.

Of note, in contextualizing ideas in the nurses’ world, most of the papers (including those not commented on specifically here!) connected nursing to “outside” ideas like posthumanism, New Materialism, radical feminism, intersectionality, poststructuralism, neoliberalism, and social justice, situating nurses as political agents, encouraging nurses to engage critically with the ideas and influences that impact their practice, the communities they serve, their profession, and the world around them. A balm for the November drizzle, “the great flood-gates of the wonder world swung open” (p. 21) revealing possibility for nursing praxis, education, philosophy, and policy (Melville, 1851/1953). A call to political action for nursing. If you are interested in reading more, you can find the concurrent session abstracts here.

Currently, the International Philosophy of Nursing Society website is under construction but IPONS would love to have you. Please contact Mark Risjord at mrisjor@emory.edu to join. Look for more information soon on the IPONS conference for 2020, which will be held in Gothenburg, Sweden. 

References

Melville, H. (1953). Moby-dick or the white whale. London, UK: Collins Clear-Type Press.

(Original work published 1851).

 

This was written in conjunction with Jane Hopkins Walsh, who also attended IPONS 2019.

Nursing Journal Editors 2019 Annual Conference: A report

Introduction by Peggy L Chinn, Editor, Advances in Nursing Science

Every year for the past 38 years, nursing journal editors have met to discuss issues in publishing and editing, challenges in the discipline that influence nursing literature, and to educate ourselves to maintain the highest standards of journalism in nursing.  The conference is planned, hosted and conducted by volunteer journal editors who are members of the International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE).

This year was no exception – we heard from experts about the latest developments that influence how people find and use our literature, the emerging trends in scholarly publishing, including the  latest developments in standards for scholarly writing and ways of attributing cited works, and thought-provoking discussions of the nature of “evidence” and the ways in which our nursing literature provides knowledge, facts and insights that shape nursing practice.  You can see details of the program here.

Nursology.net was very visible at this year’s conference – this is the first year of the INANE conferences since the website was established in September 2018!  We provided ball point pens for all participants, and each speaker received a gift of a Nursology.net tote bag!  We also provided a breakout session and a poster to make sure that everyone at the conference knew the wonderful resource that is now available on the website for our journals and their readers!

Several of us who are on the Nursology.net management team were in attendance – here are some of our reflections:

Jane Flanagan – Editor, International Journal of Nursing Knowledge

As always, I enjoyed this conference because I see my editor friends, we have fun and I learn so much. Editing is sort of a solo act. The journal has your name on it and you want to put out the best product, but its an industry and with that are constant changes. And keeping up – well that is done at odd hours of the night because it is something we all fit in to our busy schedules. This lends itself to lots of moments where you think: “I wonder if anyone has ever dealt with this or that sort of issue”.  Thus the INANE annual conference where we can bring our questions.  It  is a low key event and because of that, we share openly.  We learn so much from each other and it creates a situation where we are part of something bigger than just the journal we edit. I find I always pick up many pearls of wisdom at the annual conference. I presented with Peggy Chinn on nursology at this conference. In a comedy of errors, Jacqui Fawcett was supposed to be with us, but could not get out to Reno due to storms. She had our poster. No worries, we just presented using our computer, which in that space worked.  Then there was the podium presentation and alas, the wrong PowerPoints were loaded and the Internet that was so vital to our presentation refused to cooperate so we winged it. No problem in this audience. They adapted to whatever we did, asked great questions and a wonderful dialogue ensued.  That’s INANE – no pressure, just collegial support.  Lastly, I want to make a plug for the auto museum in Reno – a pleasant surprise and brilliant choice for a reception – lots of laughs and amazing collection of cars – who knew? Already looking forward to Nashville!

Marlaine Smith – Advisory Board, Advances in Nursing Science

This was my first INANE Conference and I had a fabulous time.  It was a gathering of about 160 editors and publishers of nursing journals. I consider these women and men to be the current guardians of our disciplinary literature.  It is such an important responsibility.  They and their editorial boards and reviewers shape the visible and accessible knowledge of our discipline. I found the presentations to be informative, and most importantly very open and collegial.  The sessions were peppered with lots of dialogue.

I was honored to give one of the ending keynotes…title was “In Search of Knowledge for Nursing Praxis Beyond Evidence”.  I reviewed the literature from the 90s to present that critiqued our fascination, if not obsession, with “evidence-based practice”.  While EBP is important, “evidence”, as commonly thought of,  is not the only or most important knowledge to inform nursing practice. We need an epistemology for nursing praxis that is founded on the philosophies and theories of nursology and includes the depth and diversity of all patterns of knowing.  Editors, editorial boards, reviewers, faculty and practice leaders can be influential in several ways: 1) Adopt a balanced perspective on what is worthy of publication – one  that values all patterns of knowing; 2) Include in criteria for reviewers some connection to nursing’s disciplinary focus; for example, “How does this manuscripts contribute to knowledge of the human health experience?” or ”How does this author express a value for nursing’s disciplinary knowledge, that is the philosophical and theoretical perspectives of the discipline? Are relevant nursing theories cited? Reviewers and editors should review references with an eye toward the inclusion of sources from nurse authors and nursing journals; 3) Foster the development of new epistemic forms to inform praxis.  How do we develop literacies for understanding the wholeness of the human health experience? How do we develop, teach and encourage a praxis epistemology that integrates multiple sources of knowledge; and 4) Nursing research and evidence-based practice projects should be grounded in the disciplinary perspective and nursing theory.  As we guide students and review manuscripts, we need to consider what nursing theories are relevant to the studies or projects that are not cited?

Kudos to Leslie Nicoll, Peggy Chinn and the planning committee for pulling off this amazing conference in Reno.

W. Richard Cowling III – Editor, Journal of Holistic Nursing

This was my first INANE conference and there was much to impress, but my two main high points were the Nursology and the COPE sessions. The dialogue in the Nursology session reflected in many ways a great yearning for elaborating the distinctiveness of nursing through advancing knowledge based on nursing theory models. At the same time, I realized that much has been lost in the past few decades with the distraction of nursing toward medically based models of care. Some equate nursing theory and knowledge with particular conceptual and theoretical frameworks rather than the potentials to advance human betterment through the theoretical thinking nurses bring to health care because of there peculiarly essential relationships with persons, families, and communities. The COPE sessions struck me as invaluable from my perspective as a journal editor and writer because of the way the complexities of ethical issues pervade the publishing world. What the COPE leaders and community bring to this is a rich dialogue and exchange the uncovers new ways of understanding ethical issues as they impact writing and scholarship more broadly.

Jacqui Fawcett – Reviewer and advisor for several major nursing journals

My adventure for INANE 2019 encompassed

  • On July 30, A flight from my local airport in Rockland, Maine, to Boston–on time departure and arrival
  • On July 30, A flight from Boston to Denver–on time departure, arrival 4 hours late due to diversion to Cheyenne, Wyoming due to thunderstorms and wind in Denver and need for refueling
  • A cancelled flight from Denver to Reno
  • On July 30, A return “red eye” flight from Denver to Boston–slightly delayed departure due to waiting for other passengers, close to on time arrival in Boston very early in the morning of July 31.

Inasmuch as I would not have been able to get to Reno until (hopefully) some time on July 31 and, therefore, would have missed a session I was scheduled to moderate and at least the poster session and perhaps the paper  I was to present with Peggy Chinn and Jane Flanagan, and the cost of a hotel room in Denver for the night of July 30 was outrageous, I decided to return to Boston on July 30.

Thus, I  regretfully never did get to Reno for INANE 2019.

Fortunately, Peggy and Jane did get to Reno and presented our poster and paper.  Given the convenience of electronic communication (email), I was able to send the final version of our presentation to Peggy and Jane as soon as I arrived in Boston very early on July 31.

Furthermore, Leslie Nicoll was able to find someone else serve as the moderator for the session I was supposed to moderate. I thank Leslie and whoever filled in as the moderator for me.

I look forward to actually attending an INANE meeting in the near future!

Leslie Nicoll – Planning Committee and all-around INANE Gadfly! Editor, CIN (Computers Informatics Nursing) and Nurse Author & Editor

Jacqui–I look forward to seeing you at the INANE Conference next year–everyone, put it on your calendar: INANE 2020, Nashville, TN, August 2-5, 2020.

I have been a journal editor since 1995 and attended my first INANE that summer–in London. I was a happy participant for many years but in 2014, when we hosted the conference in Portland, ME, I became truly committed to the cause (it is a cause as we are all volunteers!) and have worked very hard to “raise the bar” for INANE. Every year people say, “This is the best INANE ever!” and then we try to top it the next year–and have managed to do so for 6 years. It is important that we continually push ourselves in terms of the content that is presented, because as Marlaine noted, the women and men in attendance are the “guardians of the disciplinary literature.” As such, we have a responsibility to ensure that we are adhering to best standards of scholarly publication; dealing appropriately with ethical issues that might arise; communicating  effectively with all stakeholders–not just authors; and being “ahead of the curve” on current trends and innovations that will impact our work and publications.

As a key planner for INANE, I work hard to put together a conference which includes keynote sessions, panel discussions, breakout and poster sessions, plus time for networking. This is all done to meet the key responsibilities noted above. This year’s conference was no exception. Our keynote speakers included two nurses, a physician, and a librarian (with a prior career in nursing) who brought diverse points of view to share with the audience. Breakout sessions and posters tend to be from those more directly involved in INANE and are a wonderful way to learn about emerging research and the day-to-day editorial work of our peers .

I believe it is important to provide stimulation to the right side of brains (which opens the left side for maximum learning!) and we do this at INANE with our opening gala speaker. This year, Carolyn Dufurenna, who describes herself as a “rancher and poet,” joined us to get the show on the road (literally) and for me, she was a highlight. Everyone else was great, too, but Carolyn just added a little extra flair. She loved speaking at INANE and would welcome future invitations to present to nurses. Keep that in mind if you are planning a conference in the Reno or nearby!

Maybe the best thing about INANE is that it is big enough to stimulate lots of discussion, but small enough so that everyone feels like they have a chance to meet everyone else. It is certainly the highlight of my year–I am already looking forward to Nashville! I hope to re-connect with many friends but also have the chance to make new friends. To those reading this who don’t know me–I look forward to meeting you at INANE!

 

 

Report of the 17th Biennial International Neuman Systems Model Symposium

Thank you to guest bloggers Karen Gehrling and Lora L .Wyss for this report!  Scroll down for guest blogger information.

Erin Maughan delivering Keynote Address on Population Health Friday, Malone University

On June 20-21, 2019, approximately 100 nurse scholars gathered in Canton, Ohio for the 17th Biennial International Neuman Systems Model (NSM) Symposium. Colleagues from around the world gathered to share knowledge and expertise in population health and the Neuman Systems Model (NSM).

The keynote speaker, Dr. Erin Maughan, shared significant population health issues and the importance of using models of care as context for interventions. Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett, an expert on conceptual models of nursing, built on the keynote to discuss a NSM perspective of the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Population Health. Podium and poster presentations focused on the application of the NSM for education, research, and practice within the context of various worldwide population health issues.

Dr. Fawcett delivering Plenary Address Malone University

On Thursday evening, at Walsh University, we were inspired by Dr. Betty Neuman, who sent videotaped greetings and encouragement to the participants for moving the use

Global Café discussion led by DeLyndia Green Walsh University

of the NSM forward. Global café discussions provided an opportunity to dialogue about population health issues directly affecting a variety of client systems. On Friday, at Malone University, attendees continued the dialogue and began forging new connections and collaborations between colleagues from across the nation and Europe. Many of the NSM Fellows and grant recipients discussed the application of the NSM as guides for their research, education, or practice work. We will be posting many of the presentations on the Nursology.net 2019 conference page as soon as they become available!

Neuman Systems Model Fellows and Grant recipients: (L-R: Fatma Mataoui, Mickie Schuerger, Dawn Pla, Dwaine Thomas, Obiageli Obah, Marcia Jones-George)

Here are reflections from a few of the Symposium attendees:

Reception Walsh University

Mary Cook, from North Canton, OH, wrote: What a great opportunity to network with nursologists who not only know the Neuman Systems Model (NSM), but truly live (practice) the model. I was amazed at how “easily” some of the conference attendees and presenters on the first day during the Global Café discussions were able to extemporaneously frame shared comments within the NSMl. I was again awed by the presentations, both poster and podium, on the second day in relation to application of the NSM to diverse phenomena. It was overwhelming yet inspiring to witness the respect not only for the model but for the work of Dr. Neuman, Dr. Fawcett, Neuman Systems Trustees, and Fellows. I have had exposure to many of the nursing theories but have not had an opportunity to truly apply one model in my practice. What a great example of how theory can be and is used to guide daily nursing practice.
Mary Cook added: I had the privilege of organizing and overseeing the Silent Auction that is the fundraising portion of each Neuman Systems Model Symposium. There were numerous items donated but the two that commanded the most attention and competitive bidding were framed photos of Dr. Betty Neuman and Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett. Wow! What excitement over the possibility of owning a photo that represented so much to so many! The mentorship provided by these outstanding nursologists is astounding! We must continue mentoring and exploring effective strategies for engaging nursing students (undergraduate and graduate) as well as nurses at all levels of practice in theory application.

DeLyndia Green-Laughlin, from Baton Rouge, LA, wrote: The Neuman Systems Model Symposium was amazing as always, with forward thinking scholars working in collaboration to envision a brighter tomorrow. In this time of globalization, assessing population health through the lens of the NSM could not have been more appropriate. Having been a former school nurse myself, I cared for students and families in a time immediately after Hurricane Katrina. As our keynote speaker, Dr. Erin Maughan compared the Public Health Model with the Neuman Systems Model, I was reminded of the reconstitution the community experienced during the aftermath of the storm. As we had to work through the intra, inter, and extrapersonal stressors toward healing, addressing all five interacting variables was the keys to becoming whole again. In sharing the lived experience with families whose community was destroyed as a result of this environmental stressor, the NSM holds true for its use in the community. I was so excited to hear the many presentations during the symposium. Use of the NSM as a framework to address the opioid crisis that has devastated our nation, the impact caregiving will have on the community in the upcoming years, and our educators structuring their assignments within the model were a part of the breakout sessions. Dr. Neuman, thank you for your contribution to the Profession of Nursing.

Colleagues from The Netherlands attending the Symposium

Wichert Trip, an attendee from Zwolle, The Netherlands: Looking back at the NSM congress a couple of things popped out. Since 3 years I know of the existences of the NSM. I consider myself a freshman. I was overwhelmed by the magnitude of the concept. Not only is it applicable on a single patient, it’s very suitable for communities as well. As a community nurse I saw the NSM from a new perspective. That made my excited and I’m going to integrate the NSM into the minor Connecting Community Professional at Viaa University. I’m looking forward to the next congress!

Foekje Pol-Roorda, an attendee from The Netherlands: “A child with asthma must use his inhaler. But what if the mold grows on the walls at home? Or if the medication is not collected from the pharmacy during the holidays?” This example appealed to me in particular. I often draw students’ attention to the client system, but I also often refrain from making them aware of using inter, intra and extra personal factors to get a good picture of the situation. I myself give a lot of lessons in the minor Palliative care. The congress and the example above made me aware that we can look much more through the NSM and implement it even more in the Minor. And I think that this is an important purpose of a conference: improving education, improving professional practice. Personally, this congress has certainly given me an impulse to make the NSM an integrated part of my daily practice.

Ferdy Pluck, Poster Presenter, from Utrecht, The Netherlands, Malone University

Guest bloggers

Karen Gehrling, RN, PhD

Dr. Gehrling, a Neuman Systems Model Trustee since 1999, is a faculty member at  Walsh University Byers School of Nursing. She has been using the NSM to guide her scholarly work and educational endeavors for many years. In 2016, Dr. Gehrling received the Neuman Award, “established in honor of Dr. Betty Neuman for her distinguished contributions to the nursing profession and given annually to a member of the nursing profession who has made significant contributions to the profession as a nursing educator, leader or clinician. ‘Karen is an outstanding leader in nursing theory development and nursing education,’ said 2015 Neuman Award Recipient Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett, who presented the award to Dr. Gehrling. ‘She is a superb scholar with a record of numerous important papers published in top-ranked peer-review journals and important books, as well as many presentations on timely topics at regional, national and international conferences. Most of all, Karen is an outstanding scholar of the Neuman Systems Model.’ Her areas of interests with the Neuman Systems Model include developing a theory of reconstitution, helping nursing programs and curriculum development utilize the Neuman Model, helping students focus on family communication techniques and health promotion while using Neuman as a framework and the family as client, and most recently while consulting in Colombia South America, learning about the need to translate Neuman’s work into Spanish.” Retrieved from https://www.walsh.edu/nursing-research-day-2016-recap

Lora L .Wyss, PhD,  APRN-CNS

Lora Wyss earned Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from George Mason University in Fairfax VA, a school nurse certification from Ashland University, and a PhD from the University of Akron. Currently, she teaches nursing full time at Malone University. Beyond her teaching responsibilities, Lora is the President of the Hartville Migrant Ministry Board as well as the nursing director of the medical clinic. Latino migrant farm workers who sought treatment at the center were the subject of her doctoral dissertation and of her outgoing research. Lora has studied the impacts of culture, economic hardship, gender, isolation, and status as barriers to medical treatment.

 

Roy Adaptation Association – International (RAA-I): 2019 Annual Conference Report

Debra Hanna, inducted as first President of RAA-I, June 8, 2019

We welcome this report contributed by Debra R. Hanna, President, RAA-I.  For additional information about the conference, and to download selected presentations, see the Nursology.net past conference page here.

Members of the Roy Adaptation Association—International gathered in Los Angeles, California on June 7 and 8, 2019 for their annual conference. This year’s conference theme was “Adaptation Towards Transformation for the Future.”
The conference opened with a lively, intriguing presentation by Dr. Scott Ziehm from University of San Francisco, California. His presentation “The State of Nursing Science through the DNP and PhD lens: Historical Perspectives and Future Directions” aptly set the stage for two workshops that followed. Dr. Ellen Buckner from Samford University, Alabama, conducted a dynamic workshop on Knowledge for DNP education. Dr. Debra Hanna from Molloy College in New York, and Drs. Alejandra Alvarado and Maria Elisa Moreno-Fergusson from Universidad de la Sabana in Chia, Colombia conducted a second workshop on Knowledge for PhD Education. The workshops were followed by the Awards ceremony for presenters of Award-winning papers. That afternoon, attendees enjoyed a relaxing reception during the poster session.

The second conference day opened with a networking breakfast, where Executive Board member Dr. Pamela Senasac guided attendees in an enjoyable ice-breaker exercise. A spirit of welcoming hospitality has always characterized our annual RAA-I conferences, so the ice-breaker exercise was in keeping with our long-established organizational persona. RAA-I Executive Board members hope to always preserve the spirit of genuine welcome to every colleague that wishes to join us.
Sr. Callista Roy gave an inspiring keynote speech: “Adaptation Towards Transformation for the Future.” After a short coffee break, the conference resumed with presentations of award-winning papers.

The Susan Pollack Award went to Melissa Lord, DNP, Jennifer Hunt, DNP and Ellen Buckner, PhD for their study: Promoting Adaptation in Female Inmates to Reduce Risk of Opioid Overdose Post-Release through [project] HOPE. The Lizzie Whetsell Award went to Britton Buckner and Ellen Buckner, PhD, for their work using the Roy Adaptation Model to facilitate child adaptation in refugee-camps. The Carol Baer Award went to Luis Carlos Rodriguez Chanis and Yolanda Gonzalez, PhD of Panama, for their study of people living with chronic heart failure. The General and Mrs. Huberto Valesco Award went to Drs. Alejandra Alvarado Garcia and Blanca Venegas for their research to develop coping strategies within a group of chronically ill elderly adults. The last award was recently established as a memorial for one of our late RAA-I colleagues from Colombia. The Maria Elena Lopez award went to Beverly Kass, DNP, of New Jersey for her study that addressed caregiver coping with role strain.
During the annual Business Meeting the Leadership Mentoring program was described. Nine new mentees were matched with eight mentors in a short ceremony. Three newly elected officers of RAA-I were inducted: Dr. Debra Hanna, President, 2019-2012; Dr. Clare Butt, Treasurer, 2019-2021; Dr. Ellen Buckner, Secretary, 2019-2022. Sr. Callista Roy reported that Dr. Sumiko Tsuhako, our well-loved Executive Board member and First President of RAA-Japan has decided to step down from these roles after more than 13 years. Several colleagues from Japan were present at this year’s conference with very good news about the formation at St. Mary’s College in Fukuoka, Japan of a wonderful new nursing research center. From the photos they shared with attendees, we saw that the Roy Academia Nursology Research Center is located in Roy Academia Hall at St. Mary’s College. Transformation for the future of RAA-I was evident in several ways this year.

Our next annual conference for RAA-I will be held in Los Angeles, California on June 19, 20, 2020. The theme for the 2020 conference is: Roy Adaptation Model: Contributions to Authentic Nursing Knowledge. The Call for Abstracts will be released soon.

Mount St. Mary’s University Los Angeles, California.
Photo retrieved from https://www.msmu.edu/about-the-mount/nursing-theory/roy-adaptation-association/conference/

Reflections on the 6th National Nursing Ethics Conference

by Guest Blogger Darcy Copeland

See Conference details page

Ethics of Caring ®– the 6th National Nursing Ethics Conference was held at the University of California, Los Angeles March 21-22.  The theme of this year’s conference was Vulnerability and Presence:  An invitation to explore the intersection of vulnerability and the power of presence.  The two days were packed with keynote, plenary, breakout sessions and case discussions.

Joan Liaschenko

Joan Liaschenko delivered the opening keynote session: “The Moral Work of Nursing, Vulnerability, and Moral Community.”  The moral work of nursing involves acting for patients, helping patients have a life, and advocacy and relationship with others is the vehicle for nursing, our instrument.  Attendees were challenged to transform our work environments into moral communities. We are all vulnerable to the actions of others.  Nursing has a very important role in healthcare and we must hold others accountable to take our concerns seriously because our part is just as important as any other.

Denise Dudzinski then led a discussion, “Tackling Moral Distress with the Moral Distress Map”.  Nurses are susceptible to moral distress in part because of our strong commitment to the wellbeing of others.  We have a heightened sense of moral responsibility – and in general, we have more responsibility in our work than we do authority.  Our moral responsibility coming into contact with powerlessness can result in moral distress.  A challenging situation an audience member experienced was used to walk through the steps of a moral map:  identifying emotions, sources, constraints, conflicting responsibilities, possible actions, and final action.

Amy Haddad

Amy Haddad, a Hastings Center Fellow, described the poetry of witness and confessional writing in her closing, “Can You Describe This? Bearing Witness to Vulnerability”.  In sharing some of her own poetry she illustrated what is means to bear witness to the suffering of others.  Powerful examples of vulnerability from the perspectives of patients and providers were read, and felt, through the medium of poetry.

Kathy Brown-Saltzman led a discussion with Marsha Fowler who described her love affair with the ANA Code of Ethics.  She shared her personal journey to her ethics and spirituality work in nursing and inspired us all to envision the Code of Ethics as a document capable of guiding us in virtually any situation in which we find ourselves.

Jay Baruch, an assistant professor of medicine and author, described caring for others as caring for their stories during “Can We Write a Better Story for Ourselves”.  He embodied the conference’s vulnerability theme by sharing excerpts from some of his own, unpublished stories.

Daniel Goldberg

Daniel Goldberg, a historian and public health ethicist, connected the dots between stigma and vulnerability with “Vulnerability, Ethics, and Nursing:  Considering Health Stigma”.  Stigmatization results in certain groups of people experiencing worse morbidity and mortality outcomes when compared to groups who are not stigmatized. It is antithetical to our professional values.  Despite these both being the case, stigmatization of patient groups by providers is common.  The complexity of this structural/social phenomenon was discussed.

In between these phenomenal presentations were two case based small group discussions and a variety of break-out sessions focused on moral distress, vulnerability, stigma, healthcare ethics consultation, and the power and uses of stories and poetry.

Thank you to all members of the planning committee for putting together a truly remarkable conference.

Reflections on Case Western Reserve “Nursing Theory: A 50 Year Perspective Past and Future”

Download conference program
Download Chinn keynote
Go to photos
Go to videos
Go to conference information

On March 21-22, 2019, about 120 nurse scholars gathered in Cleveland, Ohio to celebrate 50 years since the earliest nursing theory conferences were held at Case Western Reserve and the University of Colorado.  (see 1967, 1968 and 1969 details). I believe this vibrant conference will be recognized as another landmark event in the history of nursing, a time when we renewed our appreciation of our core nursology ideas, ideals, mission and purposes, a time when we envisioned new possibilities, and a time when we launched significant initiatives to bring our values into action. The many doctoral students who attended, and who presented their work, speak to the significance of this event for the future.

We will be posting many of the presentations on the Nursology.net page for this conference as soon as they become available!

Here are reflections from a few of our nursology.net management team members who were there!

Leslie Nicoll –
It was a great conference overall–I am glad I went and had the opportunity to present. It was wonderful being with “like minded” folks and having the chance to spend two days thinking about nursing theory, science, and knowledge. I haven’t done that for awhile and it was a good exercise for my brain!
Looking around the room, certainly we skewed older, but I was encouraged by the younger people–doctoral students–and their enthusiasm. I think we definitely need to think about how we “pass the baton” from us oldsters to those who will be carrying on this work. This did get mentioned in the closing discussion but I think we need to be explicit and supportive. As many noted, nursing theory can get pushed aside or taken out of nursing curricula and that is not a good thing, since it underpins all of what we think and do.
One other thought–I was struck by how much Cleveland has changed, and in a good way! I am a CWRU alum from the mid-1980s. Although I didn’t spend a lot of time on campus/in Cleveland since I was a long-distance, summer student, my impression at the time was that Cleveland was definitely a city that was experiencing a very rough patch in its history. It’s nice to see the positive changes–the city looks much more vibrant, is cleaner, and feels safer. I would enjoy going back for another conference and have more time to look around!
Dorothy Jones –

Comments from students and others attending the Theory Conference.

This was a conference to enjoy…it resonated with what I believe nursing knowledge brings to patients, families and communities and reinforces in me that ‘ this is the work I want to do to move the discipline forward”,

This work is my passion, meetings like this reinforces the fact that others think so to.

“The work done to promote the Nursology site as well as the amazing discussions at this meeting reflect a wealth of nursing knowledge yet to be explored and expanded”.

as one student described the meeting…”you are my hero’s … what I read about… what I believe and value.”

Hearing the voices of nursologists … reinforces my dedication to nursing knowledge development. “You must keep these meetings going”.

“It was wonderful, exciting and inspiring meeting”.

Jacqueline Fawcett –

The conference was filled with exceedingly stimulating papers and discussions by “stars” and “rising stars” of nursology.  My “take away” from Peggy Chinn’s keynote address is that we DO have a focus for the discipline of nursology, although the specific focus varies. This message propels us into the future, where ALL nursologists will clearly articulate the disciplinary focus of their choice and progress to much more explicit theory development, with the understanding that the research findings = theory and theory = evidence for practice.

Danny Willis –

The 50th Anniversary for Nursing Theory at Case Western Reserve University was an excellent conference bringing together the past, present, and future!! Powerful and relevant messages were delivered by all the presenters throughout the two days. However, in this blog, I will focus only on the opening panel presentation and keynote. One of the most inspiring overarching messages coming out of the conference was delivered in the keynote address by Dr. Peggy Chinn when she indicated that we in the discipline and profession of nursing (Nursology) do have a clear focus and identity that we are communicating widely to the world. She gave more than one example of how this is occurring. This and other messages about the central themes clarifying the discipline were timely and significant. Dr. Marlaine Smith clarified central themes of the discipline from an historical view/analysis of the literature on the focus of the discipline to identify human wholeness, health/healing/wellbeing, human-environment-health relationship, and caring.  Dr. Callista Roy promoted the central unifying focus statement of Willis, Grace, & Roy (2008) namely, facilitating humanization, meaning, choice, quality of life and healing in living and dying as the overarching goals for knowledge/theory development.  Dr. Joyce Fitzpatrick and Dr. Mary Jane Smith clarified the unitary transformative perspective of person-environment-health process; and Dr. Pamela Reed advanced a philosophical perspective (Intermodernism) for the development of scientific theory. The convergence of ideas was clarifying and powerful and still provided space for future developments. I walked away from the conference inspired to continue writing and researching and with a healthy hope for the future of nursing. It was a pleasure to interact with students from various programs and to see their lights shine when discussing the future of theory in the discipline! We must continue this work and have biennial events in which we bring together all the best of our thinkers to advance theory with all of its worth to humankind.

Margaret Dexheimer-Pharris –

Underneath the umbrella of Danny Willis’s overview of the keynotes, I would like to bring in a few highlights from just a few of the 66 stellar breakout sessions. Marry Antonelli cautioned that the “mismeasure” of the significance of nursing knowledge blurs the unique contribution nursing brings to interdisciplinary collaboration. Pamela Grace called for nursing faculty to steep themselves in nursing theory lest they be coopted; Grace proposed a definition of nursing science that resolves the question of whether nursing science is a basic or applied science (to be published in a forthcoming issue of Nursing Philosophy). Helen Erickson, Elizabeth Cunniff and colleagues, and Debra Hanna addressed various aspects of designing and delivering nursing curricula steeped in nursing theory. Leslie Nicoll awoke the audience at the end of the day with research findings on how often nurse scholars cite the work of other nurse scholars. We all left that presentation with a new sensitivity to and passion for uplifting the knowledge of the discipline. Finally, Brandon Brown from the University of Vermont gave a riveting presentation on “The Convergence of Indigenous Knowledge, Ecology, and Nursing Theory,” calling us to use an Indigenous lens to more fully envision nursing’s responsibility to all living beings, nature, and our entire environment. I came away from this conference with a renewed spirit and a sense of resurgence, convergence, and urgency. It is obvious that nurses and nursing students around the world are eager to articulate and embrace nursing knowledge—there is a resurgence. We are finding ways to come together to advance the knowledge of the discipline—there is a convergence. Finally, we are realizing that the earth and all her inhabitants need an expanded commitment of nurse caring—there is an urgency.

Marian Turkel –

Peggy thank you for your profound commitment to Nursology and the Nursology website. Danny thank you for starting the Nursology discussion thread. Your thoughts are prolific and visionary and will advance the future of Nursology . For me the conference was intellectually stimulating and the presentations from the Nursologists  in attendance will continue to advance disciplinary specific Nursology knowledge. Being at the conference affirmed for me the importance of advancing nursing theory in education, practice and research and sharing the Nursology website more intentionally with students and colleagues. I am proud to call my self a Nursologist.

Jane Flanagan –
As Danny and Jacqui said, this was a wonderful conference during which many ideas were shared and great conversations were had. It was stimulating and I feel honored to have been a part of it. My takeaway in addition to what has already been said is that nursing theory is alive and well! As we individually and collectively move our work forward, grounded in nursing theory, this will become clear to all those who now wander not yet fully knowing of nursology!
See more photos here

Opening session speakers (L to R) Joyce Fitzpatrick, Peggy Chinn, Mary Jane Smith, Marlaine Smith, Callista Roy, Pamela Reed

Opening panel: Pamela Reed speaking. Seated: Joyce Fitzpatrick, Mary Jane Smith, Marlaine Smith, Callista Roy

Mary Antonelli breakout session.

Rosemary Eustace breakout session

PhD student Beth Cunniff with Peggy Chinn

Dorothy Jones presenting, Jane Flanagan seated.

Nursology cookies contributed by Christina Nyirati (prepared by Christina’s daughter)

Jane Flanagan, Pam Grace, Dorothy (Dotty) Jones, Danny Willis, Cathy Cuchetti, Sister Callista Roy, Mary Antonelli, Jane Hopkins Walsh ~~Boston College past and present

L-R Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Brandon Brown, Peggy Chinn, Jessica Dillard-Wright, Christina Nyirati

Celebrating 30 years! The Society of Rogerian Scholars

On October 5-7, the Society of Rogerian Scholars had its 30th Anniversary conference

Dorothy Larkin

at New York University hosted by Dean Eileen Sullivan Marx with sponsorship from the University of Connecticut. And what an energizing conference it was!  Arlene Farren and the conference planners mapped out an amazing program. Dorothy Larkin opened the conference discussing ideas around holistic nursing and unitary caring science. She also led a panel discussion on the work of New York’s College of New Rochelle School of Nursing and how they infuse of Unitary Science in the Bachelor of Nursing Program.  Friday evening, we were fortunate to be the guests of Dr. Marx at a beautiful reception

John Phillips

overlooking the East River.

On Saturday, keynote speaker John Phillips discussed unitariology and nursology, providing us each with a deeper understanding of what it means to be unitary

transcendent beings on our journey as nurses. There were so many wonderful talks in the ensuing sessions. A panel discussion on power theories from Drs. Elizabeth Barrett, Peggy Chinn and E. Carol Polifroni moderated by Dr. Amy Moore with commentary from Dr. Jacqui Fawcett illuminated the idea of power as freedom and the unique role of nurses as “being the light twinkling in the darkness of health care”.

Standing L-R Jacqueline Fawcett, Carol Polifroni, Peggy Chinn. Seated Amy Kenefick Moore, Elizabeth Barrett

We heard from three new Rogerian Scholars, all students who presented their work in

Mary Antonelli

an interactive poster session to a packed room. Dr. Mary Antonelli, the 2017 Martha E, Rogers Scholars’ Fund recipient, presented her profound work on older adult couples living with chronic illness.  We all recognized the uniqueness of this nursing theory guided study, the results of which will inform caregiving in new ways.  We tearfully listened and with fond memories reminisced and as Anna Biley, Fran’s described her most personal journey of grief and healing through a Caring Science lens. What a gift she was to us.

In other sessions, the attendees agreed they do

Dorothy Jones

not want to hear the phrase “I am just a nurse.”  This sentiment was affirmed in Dr. Dorothy Jones’s work on the professional practice scale that illuminated the sacred space nurses share with their patients.  Closing speaker Howard Butcher provided a stunningly beautiful visual interpretation of unitary science through the lens of Cape Cod beaches. A fun silent auction once again this year raised over $1,000 to support future Rogerian Scholars.

Next year we will be joining other nursing theory groups in Washington D.C. on November 14-15, 2019 at the KING Conference.  See the listing of

Howard Butcher

conferences  on our “Future Events”  main menu, and the “Abstracts Due” section of the sidebar to submit an abstract for several of these conferences. At the KING conference next year,  each theory group will be allotted time for an annual business meeting. I hope to see you all there!