In Search of Truth and Reconciliation with Indigenous Communities

First they came for the communists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a communist
Then they came for the socialists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a socialist
Then they came for the trade unionists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a trade unionist
Then they came for the Jews
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Jew
Then they came for me
And there was no one was left
To speak out for me.                                 

 — Martin Niemöller

The recent discovery of multiple unmarked grave sites of children who died in Canadian residential schools is certain to be a shock for many Canadians.  Growing up in the Canadian prairies, I learned nothing of the residential school system, still operating during my school years.  Indeed, to learn that the last Canadian residential school closed only in 1996, decades after I had graduated from school, was a somber awakening for me. 

I grew up as the child of immigrants from Russia, my parents and grandparents among those escaping almost certain starvation in Stalin’s Russia.  The Canadian government was generous, offering land to European immigrants who would farm it, land, that had belonged to Indigenous Nations who had been relegated to reservations in more Northern regions of the country. I did not learn of these economic incentives until years after my parents died; I do not know if they and other European immigrants were aware that they were beneficiaries of ruthless, racist colonial policies and the harm they inflicted. If they had been, would they have refused the land or would they have felt entitled as white “Christian” settlers?  

“Spirit Catcher” – Indigenous art installation in Barrie, Ontario
Memorial at the base of the “Spirit Catcher” in memory of the children who died in residential schools. 

As I look back on my formative years, I recognize the blatant racism towards Indigenous people that was so prevalent in the use, for example, of pejorative references to Indigenous individuals, who often sought work as farm labourers. Years later, television further reinforced racist stereotypes, through the Westerns that were a major movie genre.By the late 1990s, I had become more sensitive to such racist messaging, Watching the 1995 Disney movie, “Pocahontas” with my toddler granddaughter, I was horrified at the scene in which sailors of the incoming English ship see the land and its native people and sing “Savages, Savages”.  Thankfully, she didn’t understand and asked what they were saying. Determined not to repeat the message, I responded, “Sandwiches, sandwiches – They must be very hungry.” 

In my nursing career, I have had the opportunity to work as a public health nurse with Indigenous communities in our County in addressing some of their health priorities.  The connections I made during that time afforded me the later opportunity to invite Indigenous Elders to guest in my community health classes to speak to students directly about the health issues faced by Indigenous communities. But the experience that reached my very soul was being invited to visit the Eabametoong  First Nations community during my time as President of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario.  During that visit I was invited to a meeting in which an elderly man tearfully spoke about his own experience in a residential school.  It was heart-breaking and life changing.  Not everyone has these opportunities, and to those who do not, I recommend the 2002  film, The Rabbit-Proof Fence. The film is based in Australia and depicts both the colonizing intention and brutal methods used in the attempt to extinguish Indigenous culture and replace it with a white, European one.

The residential school system began in the latter half of the 19th century, during Florence Nightingale’s lifetime. Lynn McDonald, a sociologist who has catalogued the entire collection of Nightingale’s written works (See https://cwfn.uoguelph.ca/volumes/), notes that despite racism being a social norm at the time, Nightingale was born into a more liberal family that did not share these views. Through her travels, Nightingale had become aware of the colonial residential school systems and the high morbidity and mortality rates of Indigenous residential school children. As was typical of her evidence-based approach,  she studied the health of Indigenous students in colonial residential schools and in 1863 generated a report , comparing her findings with the  health of white British children.  It is not clear to whom the report was sent, presumably the responsible British government official(s).  The report includes the statistical evidence of the health disparities of Indigenous children with British white children and includes an overview in which Nightingale identifies probable causes, areas for further research, and suggestions for corrective actions. Some of these suggestions might be expected, such as measures that would reduce the spread of communicable diseases, e.g., avoiding overcrowding and providing adequate ventilation. 

Other suggestions relate to Nightingale’s concern with the colonization process. For example, she notes that “no account appears to be taken of the past history of the races on whom it is desired to confer the inestimable blessings of Christian civilization”  (p.13). She remarks on the naturally “stronger stamina” of some tribes in their “uncivilized condition” who, when they “are obliged to conform themselves…to the vices and customs of their civilized (!)neighbours, they perish from disease” (p. 15, italics and exclamation point in original). Nightingale notes critically that many of the pioneers of “British civilization are not always the best,…ready for any act of oppression” (p.16) , and ready to take advantage through the introduction of alcohol and indulgence of their own personal vices.

Although Nightingale’s report is critical of the process of colonization, and there is some suggestion that she questioned the purpose of colonization in what seems a sarcastic reference in to bestowing “inestimable blessings of Christian civilization”, the report falls short of criticizing British Imperialistic ambitions and its related colonization policies.

As we, in the 21st century engage in de-colonization efforts, it is important to appreciate Nightingale’s work in raising the issue of the health of Indigenous residential students and providing evidence and recommendations for improvement. We wish that she had gone further and challenged the oppressive and racist nature of colonization as a foreign policy. It has become popular to label her as ‘racist’ and dismiss her on those grounds. But to do so is itself dehumanizing, as it does not consider the complexities of living within a culture while gaining sufficient distance from it to address its inherent flaws.

We must ask ourselves, how many of us know the effects of our countries’ foreign policies on citizens of other countries and have lobbied for changes to those policies?  Indeed, how many of us have studied the effects of our governments’ current domestic policies with respect to the health of Indigenous people and joined with them in demanding change? 

At this time, in Canada, the discovery of unmarked graves of children at former residential school sites is far from over. We cannot undo the past, but we can support Indigenous people in their grief, and we can join with them in lobbying  for meaningful change to confront the systemic racism that still exists and informs current policies. Canadian Senator, Murray Sinclair, Canada’s second Aboriginal judge who led the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2015 noted that, “The most important actors in the process of reconciliation are not governments, are not church leaders, they are the people of Canada.”

Nursing involves the health and healing of individuals, groups, and communities, in a culturally sensitive manner. Never has the need for healing been more pressing than now, with the discovery of more and more children’s graves at former residential school sites. Actions to facilitate such healing is consistent with nursing knowledge, particularly caring theories such as Watson/s Theory of Human Caring and Critical Caring. Furthermore, I would suggest that Senator Sinclair’s call for action for the “people of Canada” is actually an ethical imperative for nurses. Taking action to address systemic racism at the policy level is also consistent with theoretical nursing knowledge, evident in nursing theories that include a focus on upstream nursing, e.g., Critical Caring and the Butterfield Upstream Model of Population Health.  . 

If we, as nurses in the 21st century, reflect with disappointment that Nightingale did not go far enough in 1863, surely it gives us cause to reflect deeply on the activism that we are called to answer to in our own time. We have the opportunity to take Nightingale’s recommendations one step further by actively engaging with Indigenous communities and other communities of color who suffer the injustices of racism. We can advocate for policies free of outdated systemic racism. We can get involved in forming anti-racist policies and actions.  The time is now!

Guest Post – Nursing’s call to action to address the social determinants of health

Guest contributors:
Kelli DePriest, PhD, RN
Paul Kuehnert, DNP, RN, FAAN 
Teddie Potter, PhD, RN, FAAN

Recently, several Expert Panels of the American Academy of Nursing collaborated to draft a new conceptual framework and consensus statement related to social determinants of health. The year-long endeavor integrated the thoughts and expertise of 15 nursing leaders. The outcome of our work directs nursing actions toward health policies supporting actions at multiple levels (i.e., upstream, midstream, and downstream) to promote equity in planetary health-related quality of life. We propose that planetary health-related quality of life, individual and population factors, and environments are the overarching societal contexts in which population health concerns arise. These population health concerns are articulated by stakeholders who, in turn, are the catalyst for population-focused nursing actions.

These population-focused nursing actions occur at multiple levels, in a variety of settings with a variety of persons and groups, and shape health policies, systems and services. Over time, the actions and interactions depicted by the cycle change the societal contexts and may lead to enhanced planetary health-related quality of life. We underscore the crucial need to eliminate systemic and structural racism if equity in planetary health-related quality of life is to be attained. We presented our findings and implications for action during a policy dialogue at the American Academy of Nursing Policy Conference in October 2020. Collaboration on this project inspired the following call-to-action.

Call to Action

Nurses are consistently ranked the most trusted profession by the American people. This trust is earned by the demonstration of care for people, day in and day out, in a wide variety of settings. It is time for all nurses do something to address the social determinants of health. We propose three concrete approaches.

The first two approaches can be summarized as praxis. According to Paulo Freire in Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1972), praxis is reflection and action on the world  to transform it.  

Reflection, the first approach, is often overlooked in calls for action. Yet we need to take a moment to reflect on what we mean by social determinants of health and what nursing actions in this space will help us achieve health equity. The consensus makes clear that equity cannot be achieved at any level (local, national, or global) until all forms of structural racism are eliminated. Eliminating structural racism should be a shared goal for all nurses.

We have work to do around structural racism in nursing. Nursologists are starting this type of reflection and discussion through nursology.net. (see https://nursology.net/about/nursology-management-team-statement-on-racism/). These conversations need to occur wherever we live and work, in the classroom, in the community, on social media, and with colleagues inside and outside of nursing. The consensus paper can be used to spark reflection and prompt discussions to support action.

Take action on social determinants to create transformative change is the second recommended approach. Action differs depending on our role. The consensus paper draws on the conceptual framework to provide several examples of population-focused nursologists’ actions to address policy issues. The common themes from the examples are that nursologists need to have a seat at the table when all policies are developed, using a Health in All Policies approach, which  includes policymaking across sectors, not only  those policies directly related to health, and nursologists need to advocate for policies that have been shown to effectively advance health equity.

Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic people in this country are experiencing disproportionately high rates of illness and death from the COVID-19 pandemic. To address this syndemic (Poteat, Millett, Nelson, & Beyrer, 2020), we need to address the structural racism at the root cause of these disparities. Who better to forge the path forward, than this group of nursology  leaders? It is time to move to action.

Inspire action on the environment and social determinants of health is the third approach. Another population-focused nursologists’ action from the conceptual framework posits that nursologists must build coalitions to be successful in this work. Others need to be inspired to join the effort. If nursologists are unsure of how to inspire, or lack inspiration themselves, they can read a few blog posts on nursology.net or nursesdrawdown.org for examples. Nursologists can also go to #nursetwitter where there are conversations about nursologists addressing the social determinants of health along with reflection and discussion on how to dismantle structural racism within nursology. Nursologists  can also be inspired by leaders who advocate for nursology by serving on boards, writing op-eds, acting as expert sources for the media, reaching out to legislators, and/or running for office themselves. Inspiration comes in many forms. There is an energy and passion required to do this work and if you have the capacity, please help inspire others to join the movement.

We leave you with the call-to-action to reflect, act, and inspire. We look forward to continuing this conversation.

References

Freire, P. (1972). Pedagogy of the oppressed. Herder and Herder.

Poteat, T., Millett, G. A., Nelson, L. E., & Beyrer, C. (2020). Understanding COVID-19 risks and vulnerabilities among black communities in America: the lethal force of syndemics. Annals of Epidemiology47, 1–3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.05.004

About the contributors;

The authors are writing as nursology colleagues who have worked together through the Environmental and Public Health Expert Panel at the American Academy of Nursing (AAN). Paul and Teddie are the past and current chair of the expert panel and fellows of AAN and Kelli worked with the expert panel through the AAN Jonas Policy Scholars Fellowship program.

Kelli DePriest, PhD, RN

Dr. DePriest is a health policy and research fellow at the Institute for Medicaid Innovation and adjunct faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Her research mission is to investigate strategies to leverage innovation in the Medicaid program to improve and/or inform the development of interventions and policies designed to achieve health equity for children and families living in poverty. Twitter: @kellidepriest

Paul Kuehnert, DNP, RN, FAAN

Dr. Paul Kuehnert is President and CEO of the Public Health Accreditation Board, the national non-profit organization that sets standards for and accredits governmental public health departments in the United States. Dr. Kuehnert’s career spans nearly 30 years of providing executive leadership to private and governmental organizations to build and improve systems to address complex community health needs. Dr. Kuehnert is a pediatric nurse practitioner and holds the Doctor of Nursing Practice in executive leadership as well as the Master of Science in public health nursing degrees from University of Illinois at Chicago. He was named a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow in 2004, a Fellow in the National Academies of Practice in 2010, and a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing in 2015. Twitter: @PaulKuehnert

Teddie Potter PhD, RN, FAAN

Saintelmophotography.com

Dr. Potter is Clinical Professor, specialty coordinator of the Doctor of Nursing Practice in Health Innovation and Leadership, and Director of Planetary Health for the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.

Letter to the ANA

On September 26, 2020, the Nursology.net management team sent the following letter to the American Nursses Association, urging the organization to take a stand on the U.S. Presidential election candidates. We believe that given the dual pandemic of COVID-19 and racism, nursing’s strong voice of advocacy for the health of the nation must be heard. Here is the letter in its entirety:

September 26, 2020
Dr. Loressa Cole, ANA Enterprise CEO
Dr. Ernest J. Grant, President, ANA President
Dr. Debbie Hatmaker, Chief Nursing Officer, ANA Enterprise
American Nurses Association

Dear Drs. Cole, Grant and Hatmaker:


The Management Team of Nursology.net is writing to urge the American Nurses Association (ANA) to reverse its position against endorsing any candidate for President/Vice President in the 2020 election. We understand that the ANA reversed its previous policy to endorse presidential candidates based on the desire to “engage nurses in the voting process through providing accurate information and data and promoting nursing’s political advocacy role without alienating an entire contingency…acknowledging the reality of political polarization in this country” (ANA 2019 Membership Assembly Consideration of ANA’s Presidential Endorsement Process).

The recent draft of the document, Nursing’s Scope and Standards (2020), specifies nursing’s social contract with the public. The document includes nursing’s commitment to reject racism and promote equity and social justice for all. In addition, the document points to nursing’s accountability and responsibility to promote the health of all populations and to advocate for social and environmental justice, and access to high quality and equitable health care.

The proposed ANA Scope and Standards contradicts the ANA position against endorsing a presidential candidate if a particular candidate is a threat to equity, social justice, equitable healthcare and health for the population. While we respect that the Board made their decision thoughtfully, the current situation calls for a reconsideration based on the positions of the current administration that threaten public health. Scientific American, a journal who has never endorsed a candidate for president, has broken with their policy because of the dangerous anti-science views of the President

Today, the country needs to hear nursing’s voice related to this election from the ANA. We find ourselves in the midst of a perfect storm fueled by the mismanagement of a global pandemic, a health and environmental crisis from rampant fires, storms and floods attributed by scientists to climate change, and the public health crisis of systemic racism.

Many have referred to this election as the most consequential in recent history, certainly in our lifetimes. This is not the time for the nursing profession to sit out and fail to exercise our unified voice and moral authority. As the discipline focused on caring for the health and well-being of the people with an understanding of how the physical, social, political and economic environment influences health and well-being, and as the most trusted profession, the ANA must speak out against the policies of the current administration and endorse Joe Biden and Kamala Harris for President and Vice President. Please reconsider your position based on the actions taken by President Trump after your vote in 2019.

Here are a few reasons why we urge the ANA to reconsider and endorse the presidential ticket that is aligned with nursing values and actions and protects the public health:

  • The current administration’s lack of leadership to enact policies to stem the rising incidence of COVID-19 infections, including the President’s lack of providing timely information to the public that could have prevented thousands of infections and death
  • The current administration’s policies that have threatened accessibility to healthcare for millions of Americans by working to overturn the advances made through the ACA
  • The current administration’s position that denies human contributions to climate change and fails to support policies to abate its dangers.
  • The current administration’s lack of acknowledgement of the racial injustices experienced by people of color, especially Black people, at the hands of law enforcement.
  • The current administration’s policies of family separation at the border resulting in hundreds of children being placed in inhumane and dangerous conditions to their health and well-being.
  • The current administration’s lack of meaningful responsiveness to address the public health crisis of gun violence.

While the recommendations of the ANA’s Presidential Endorsement Process (2019) advocate for individual nurses to participate in election activities at the local, state and national levels and take advantage of educational opportunities to learn about the candidates that will inform their voting, nurses will look to the ANA for leadership, especially now. The ANA is the voice of the profession, and this is not the time for that voice to be silent. Without a unified position, the nursing profession is invisible, and the public trust in nursing’s commitment to protecting public health is compromised. Individual nurses can always vote their choice, but the unified voice of our profession is critical at this time in our history.

Please reverse your position and endorse the candidates that will advance policies that protect the health of the public. We cannot be silent. To be silent is to be complicit.

Thank you for your serious consideration of this request.

Respectfully,

Peggy L. Chinn, RN, PhD, DSc(Hon), FAAN peggychinn@gmail.com

Jessica Dillard-Wright, MA, MSN, CNM, RN jdillardwright@gmail.com

Rosemary William Eustace, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC

Jacqueline Fawcett, RN, PhD, ScD(hon), FAAN, ANEF

Jane Flanagan, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, AHN-BC, FNAP, FNI, FAAN

Dorothy Jones, RN, PhD, FAAN

Deborah Lindell, DNP, MSN, RN, CNE, ANEF, FAAN, Deborah.Lindell@gmail.com

Chloe Olivia Rose Littzen, MSN, RN, AE-C

Leslie H. Nicoll, PhD, RN, FAAN leslie@medesk.com

Adeline Falk-Rafael, PhD, RN, FAAN afalk-rafael@rogers.com

Marlaine C. Smith, RN, PhD, AHN-BC, HWNC-BC, FAAN

Marian Turkel, RN, PhD, NEA-BC, FAAN

Danny Willis, DNS, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN

Posthumxnism and the Pandemic

Co-contributors with Jessica Dillard Wright:*
Jane Hopkins Walsh
Brandon Blaine Brown

One of the things that’s coming to light is how the global spread of a microscopic virus is placing the ravages of racism and inequity under the microscope. But the fact is, we don’t all see the same thing! Racism has a way of actually DISTORTING our vision. Intertwined with many other forms of social domination, racism is mercurial, innovative, even viral.” (Benjamin, 2020

Celestial Octopus

Our Celestial Octopus, emblem of the Compost Collaborative, created by nurse-artist Christian Tedjasukmana

As the Compost Collaborative,** a posthumxn rhizome of feminist, queer, nursing joy and terror, we wish to acknowledge some of the deep, enduring, and trenchant lessons of our dystopian present. As friends and scholars, we are deeply connected by a shared passion for a radical posthumxn path for the future of nursing. We first wish to convey our deep love, respect, and solidarity for the nurses who are actively engaged in the dangerous daily work of caring for folks infected with COVID19. Second, we recognize our privilege and positionality as white colonizers with access to medical care, physical goods, and material resources, knowing that power and access are not shared by all, deeply contingent on the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, class, colonial positionality. Posthumxnism is a critique of and response to humanism and its anthropocentric fixation, one that seeks to scrutinize the humxn and nonhumxn consequences of capitalism (Bradiotti, 2019). In advancing a posthumxn critique for and of nursing in the time of COVID19, we see our work growing out of the emancipatory tradition, centering critical perspectives, feminist analyses, queer inquiry, justice-oriented praxis as we navigate terra incognita (Kagan et al., 2014; Grace & Willis, 2012).

Here we sit, isolated in distant states recognizing that the dystopian imagined future is suddenly a fervent, fevered reality and nursing along with its healthcare comrades are essentially located in the interstices. Our speculative theorizing about the posthumxn present-future of nursing is in continuity with the future-oriented, space-exploring vision of Martha Rogers (1992), though our cosmic view is tempered with the urgency, pragmatism, and the reality of excavating the past while navigating the crises of our present from pandemic to scarcity to racism to climate change to colonialism to extinctions and more. The urgency for a posthumxn path forward has crashed on the doorstep and posthumxnism is ringing the bell. The posthumxn convergence is calling, Braidotti’s (2019) mash-up vision of posthumxnism and the end of life as we know it. This turn is a critical decentering of humxn in the broad landscape of our ecological terrain that subverts anthropocentric humxnism and its white, ableist, colonial, Eurocentric, cisgender, patriarchal biases, bound up in the neoliberal, capitalist world-ecology, as Jason Moore would call it. 

Humxns are a part of – not rulers over – global political economy-cum-world-ecology, underscored currently by the trans-species complexity of COVID19. In advancing posthumxnism, we also wish to respect and amplify ontological views that are foundational within Indigenous ways of knowing. Long erased by settler-colonial nations and scholars, these ontologies fashion a world in which humans exist coequally with the nonhumxn and the nonliving (LaDuke, 2017).

For a speed course in postanthropocentrism and posthumxnism, consider this novel virus, born of a pangolin, a bird, a pig, a lizard, a bat, a monkey. The viral RNA origins are non-humxn, the virus itself nonliving. Witness the impact as the virus quietly infects and swiftly overpowers contemporary humxnity, bringing powerful global enterprises, international trade, healthcare systems, educational structures, and communities to their knees. Here, the boundaries blur between the humxn and the nonhumxn, the posthumxn subject no longer bios but zoe (Braidiotti, 2019). The pandemic also highlights the communitarian imperative of humxn and nonhumxn life on this rock we call home, as we struggle with social distance and mourn the loss of normalcy. Making kin, Haraway’s (2016) concept of reordering multispecies world relations seems especially relevant in the face of this current crisis, underscoring how inextricably intertwined lives are and continue to become. Humxns shelter in place, leaving nonhumxn creatures to reclaim their once and future territories, roads and highways eerily deserted and quiet, free from the imposition of humxn interlopers. Signs of the postanthropos.

As we think of our planetary crisis, we recognize a cosmic unity similar to that advanced by Martha Rogers in her conceptual framework, the “Science of Unitary Human Beings” (1992). But we also recognize a necessary critique of the concept of “unitary,” problematically failing to account for the historical and contemporary power differentials and legacies of oppression between groups of people in the US and around the globe.  Rogers’ (1992) concept of unitary human beings included an irreducible, indivisible union of people and their worlds (p. 28). The concept of “unity,” however, obscures differentials of power that exist between different communities and their world that enforce inequality. 

We see a posthumxn reading of Rogers’ unitary framework in Posthumxnist Rosi Braidotti’s (2019) insistence that “we-are-(all)-in-this-together but we-are-not-one-and-the-same” (p. 52) that accounts for critical perspectives on how power and oppression structure inequality, even as we endure shared experiences. This reflection on our subjective experience is ever more prescient and poignant as United States political decision-making prioritizes economics and return to normal over humxn life, disappointing but far from surprising given our capitalist imperative to extract! Extract! Extract! And extract some more. As scholar Ruha Benjamin points out as governmental powers push to return to normal, the prepandemic normal was not so great for everyone (2020). 

The uneven unfolding of our dystopian crises belies the jingoistic and unitary notion of “we, the people.” “We, the people” will not experience the pandemic in equitable ways, even while viral RNA presumes to be a great equalizer, making no provision for race, gender, creed, color, sexuality, national identity. In truth, COVID19 etches the inequalities between us deeper still. The virus has and will continue to infect both the powerful and the powerless, though with uneven speed and inequitable consequences. The rich and powerful with unlimited access to viral testing with rapid results, symptomatic or no, while most are turned away. As millions lose their jobs, and with it, health insurance, the cracks in the U.S. healthcare “system” extend and grow wider.

The accretional benefits of power, access, economic and educational accumulation, family reserves built and fortified across generations through a legacy of colonial, white, cisgender, able heteropatriarchy buffer the privileged, making social distance and sheltering in place a relative luxury. White-collar workers collect salaries as they work from home facilitated by the endless, spidery connections that link us via technology, further highlighting our interspecies technological cyborg nature (Haraway, 1990). Even with this kind of padded seclusion there is weirdness, alienation, and violence of its own. The imperative to continue to produce belies the severity of the crisis at hand, even while it is bedecked in the privilege of safety from illness conferred by sheltering in place.

These same principles, sheltering in place and social distance, further marginalized those individuals already on the margins. Hourly-wage earners, the billions of global workers like shopkeepers, caterers, restaurant workers, wait staff, ticket takers wonder how they will survive, subjugated by the laws of Cheap Nature, if they do not have enough money for food and rent (Moore, 2016). Or for medical bills. Or a ventilator. The mundane slow violence of life under capitalism is amplified, writ large under times of crisis, as speculative, nightmarish hypotheticals become breathtaking realities, a startling necropolitics of neoliberalism, the biopolitical power to determine who lives and who dies as a function of capitalism (Mbembe, 2019; Nixon, 2011). This doesn’t even begin to account for the racist violence and inequities of mass incarceration and detention, the impossibility of social distancing for individuals within institutions, and the callous disposability this implies for the individuals trapped by incarceration or detention and those charged with their care.

Posthumxnism asks us to consider what we are capable of becoming, together as humxn and nonhumxn for a more just, egalitarian, and equitable future. This is our charge as posthumxn nurses – to imagine AND THEN CREATE a present-future, one that makes space for the plurality of beings and ways of being in the world, building the bridge as we leap. In building this path, we can cultivate zoecentric knowledge that subverts biocentrism, gazing past the anthropocentric, humxnistic, and exclusionary philosophies that privilege extraction and profit over nature, nonhumxns, and dehumxnized humxns.

The present-future requires that we – as nurses and everyone else – embrace methodologies for cross-pollination between, among, alongside, and interconnected with actors from all crevices of our world ecologies: ecological, geological, political, environmental, animal, mineral, pop-culture, art, media and technology. All bets are off: nothing is too weird or too daring, a radical departure from current modes of nursing thought (Braidotti, 2019). The divisions between theory and philosophy come tumbling down as we seek critical reflection, explanations, understanding, connection, fusion. In this apocalyptic present-future, multispecies posthumxn nursing knowledge can be knit, sung, woven, danced, spun, rapped, embroidered, dyed, hummed, planted in a garden, or spray-painted on train cars, the interrelation of humxn and nonhumxn all a part of the process of posthumxn-becoming. And this proposition of posthumxn knowing is congruent with fine threads of nursing thought, as we consider Rogers (1992) ideas of color, humor, sound, Carper’s (1978) aesthetic way of knowing and the emancipatory ways of knowing advanced by Chinn and Kramer (2018). 

In this space-time of pandemic ennui, which coincidentally coincides with the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife, what we must nurse is radical solidarity, a recognition that we are all in this together, even though we aren’t all the same (Haiven & Khasnabish, 2014). And the stakes are ominously high, should we fail to embrace this communitarianism. A future for healthcare, for sky, for nurses, for ALL people, for plants, for animals, for insects, for viruses, for bacteria, for trash, for compost, for kids, for terra, for seas, for space – any future at all – demands that we work together, composting the boundaries that separate us. This is not what we as nurses imagined for “our year,” but it is poetic-ironic that this is what we face. Together. 

“Despair is not a project, affirmation is.” (Bradiotti, 2019, p. 3).


**We call ourselves Compost Collaborative, a nod to feminist multispecies ecologist Donna Haraway, who captivated our collective imagination and informs our approaches to decaying boundaries of all kinds in nursing and in life. We are scholastically and tentacularly connected in our collaborative work as nurse-compost-scholars. This post was written by Jessica Dillard-Wright, Jane Hopkins Walsh, and Brandon Blaine Brown. Our collaborative is fungible, however, and our ideas are collective, part of a social process influenced by people, animals, environments, and ideas far and wide.

References

Benjamin, R. (2020, April 15). Black skin, white masks: Racism, vulnerability and Refuting black pathology. Retrieved from https://aas.princeton.edu/news/black-skin-white-masks-racism-vulnerability-refuting-black-pathology

Braidiotti, R. (2019). Posthuman Knowledge. Polity Press.

Carper, B. A. (1978). Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(1), 13–24.

Chinn, P., & Kramer, M. (2018). Knowledge Development in Nursing: Theory and Process (10th ed.). Elsevier.

Grace, P. J., & Willis, D. G. (2012). Nursing responsibilities and social justice: An analysis in support of disciplinary goals. Nursing Outlook, 60(4), 198-207. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.outlook.2011.11.004

Haiven, M., & Khasnabish, A. (2014). The Radical Imagination. Fernwood Publishing.

Haraway, D. (1990). A manifesto for cyborgs: Science, technology, and socialist feminism in the 1980s. In L. Nicholson (Ed.), Feminism/postmodernism (pp. 190–233). Routledge.

Haraway, D. (2016). Staying with the trouble: Making kin in the Chthulucene. Duke University Press.

Kagan, P., Smith, M., & Chinn, P. (2014). Introduction. In P. Kagan, M. Smith, & P. Chinn (Eds.), Philosophy and Practices of Emancipatory Nursing: Social Justice as Praxis (pp. 1–20). Routledge.

LaDuke, W. (2017). All our relations: Native struggles for land and life. Haymarket Books.

Mbembe, A. (2019). Necropolitics (M. Tauch, Trans.). Duke University Press.

Moore, J. (2016). The Rise of Cheap Nature. In Anthropocene or capitalocene: Nature, history, and the crisis of capitalism (pp. 78–115). Kairos Books.

Nixon, R. (2011). Slow violence and the environmentalism of the poor. Cambridge MA:     Harvard University.

Rogers, M. E. (1992). Nursing science and the space age. Nursing Science Quarterly, 5(1), 27-34.

*About the contributors

Jess Dillard-Wright, MA, MSN, CNM, RN

A regular blogger for Nursology.net, Jess is a nurse-midwife and a PhD candidate at Augusta University. Her dissertation is an intellectual history of nursing and feminism, a history of the present untangling the faults and fissures that characterize the interrelationship between feminism and the profession, focusing specifically on Cassandra Radical Feminist Nurses Network. When she is not thinking about nursing, you’ll find Jess hanging out with her three kids and partner. Together, they like to go to the beach, play silly game(may we humbly suggest Throw Throw Burrito?), read books, and *try* to bake amazing things.

Brandon Brown MSN, RN-BC, CNL,

Brandon is a faculty member and Doctor of Education student at the University of Vermont and is one of the founding members of the Nursing Theory Collective. His research interests center upon the philosophical analysis of nursing theory, practice, and pedagogy through a critical posthuman and post-anthropocentric lens. When Brandon is not doing scholarly work, you can find him spending time with his family hiking, canoeing, and camping.

Jane Hopkins Walsh

Jane is a theory loving, Spanish speaking pediatric nurse practitioner at Boston Children’s Hospital. A Nursing PhD Candidate at Boston College, Jane is an immigrant rights activist who is co-enrolled in a certificate program at the Center for Human Rights and International Justice at the Lynch School of Education. Her main areas of interest are global health, im/migrant populations, and community based service delivery models to deliver nursing care for underserved children, emerging adults and families. She was awarded two global grants through Boston Children’s Hospital to coordinate services for children with complex care needs in remote areas of Honduras, and to explore the elevated incidence of chronic kidney disease in Central America with a transnational team. Links to her favorite NGO and volunteer immigrant rights groups can be found at the end of her blog posts on radicalnurses.com

 

 

 

Visions for 2020 – the Year of the Nurse

To all Nursology.net visitors – welcome to the Year 2020!  As we enter this year, we members of the site management and blogging teams join in celebrating the “Year of the Nurse and Midwife” and offer our visions for the coming year and beyond!

The year 2020 was designated In January 2019 by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the “Year of the Nurse and Midwife”  in honor of the 200th birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale.  Far from being a mere sentimental expression recognizing the importance of nursing and midwifery worldwide, this designation is part of a worldwide effort to improve health globally by raising the status of nursing and midwifery.  Here is the statement issued in establishing this designation:

The year 2020 is significant for WHO in the context of nursing and midwifery strengthening for Universal Health Coverage. WHO is leading the development of the first-ever State of the World’s Nursing report which will be launched in 2020, prior to the 73rd World Health Assembly. The report will describe the nursing workforce in WHO Member States, providing an assessment of “fitness for purpose” relative to GPW13 targets. WHO is also a partner on The State of the World’s Midwifery 2020 report, which will also be launched around the same time. The NursingNow! Campaign, a three-year effort (2018-2020) to improve health globally by raising the status of nursing will culminate in 2020 by supporting country-level dissemination and policy dialogue around the State of the World’s Nursing report.

Nurses and midwives are essential to the achievement for universal heath coverage. The campaign and the two technical reports are particularly important given that nurses and midwives constitute more than 50% of the health workforce in many countries, and also more than 50% of the shortfall in the global health workforce to 2030. Strengthening nursing will have the additional benefits of promoting gender equity (SDG5), contributing to economic development (SDG8) and supporting other Sustainable Development Goals. (from https://www.who.int/hrh/news/2019/2020year-of-nurses/en/)

As members of the Nursology.net management team, we are welcoming the 2020 “Year of the Nurse and Midwife” with our visions for this coming year and beyond.  We hope our ideas will inspire you to join in making these values and visions a reality!

Maggie Dexheimer Pharris –

2020 vision. During an eye exam, there is a moment when just the right corrective lens falls into place and suddenly we appreciate 20/20 clarity of vision. Remarkable!  So too it is with theory. In this new decade may nurses around the world find just the right nursology theory to clearly see the path to creating a meaningful practice and equitable, accessible, and healing systems of care!

Karen Foli – 

Unity among nurses based on the care we offer and the universal experiences we share. kindness directed toward patients and fellow nurses, even when they may be unable to reciprocate in that moment. Wisdom to understand how nursing power can be harnessed to forward a sustainable, balanced work life and advocate for improvements in patient and family care. And for nurses’ truth to be spoken freely, a reality to be heard and honored.

Peggy Chinn – 

A renewal of deep respect and tireless dedication for the core values of our discipline – protection of the dignity of each individual, advocacy for the needs of those we serve, and belief in the healing potential of our caring relationships.

Marlaine Smith – 

An accelerating appreciation for the distinctive knowledge of the discipline and the unique contribution that this knowledge can make to the health, well-becoming and quality of life of those we serve. With this appreciation will come the growth of research that is focused on the theories of nursology and practice models that are theory-guided.  Our focus on human wholeness, health as well-being/becoming, the human-environment-health interrelationship and caring is what is missing and most needed in healthcare.

Jane K. Dickinson  –

My vision is that all nurses will know, value, and be guided by nursing knowledge and take caring to the next level in education, practice, and research.

Jessica Dillard-Wright – 

Because 2020 has been declared the Year of the Nurse by the World Health Organisation, my vision for the year is that nursing will embrace the emancipatory potential of our discipline, recognizing the interface between nursing knowledge, nursing praxis, and wellbeing on a global scale. In so doing, we can dismantle injustice and mobilize our profession to nurse the world.

Jacqueline Fawcett

 Now is the perfect time to accept NURSOLOGY as the proper name for our discipline and profession. Now is the perfect time to realize that all individuals licensed as Registered Nurses or equivalent designation worldwide are NURSOLOGISTS. Now is the perfect time for all nursologists to realize they are “knowledge workers” who engage in development, application, and dissemination of nursology discipline-specific knowledge so that we know and everyone else knows the what, why, how, where, and when of our work with those individuals and groups who  seek our services.

Chloe Littzen – 

My vision for nursing in 2020 is that we find unity among our diversity, despite settings, education levels, or beliefs, and work collaboratively to advance the discipline, enabling all nurses epistemic authority and well-being.

Rosemary Eustace – 

The year 2020 is a great reminder of the “200” unique contributions nurses and midwives make each day to improve health, health care, health policy and nursing across diverse settings.  As we celebrate this milestone, let us light our lamps in unity to advance nursing knowledge that is congruent with contemporary health care demands. Let us keep the Power of Nursology alive!

Marian Turkel – 

Vision for 2020: Nursing theory will guide nursing education, nursing practice and nursing research. RN-BSN, BSN and MSN programs will have at least one nursing theory course in the curriculum.  DNP and PhD curriculum will have 2 nursing theory courses.  Nursing faculty and Registered Nurses in the practice setting doing research will use a nursing theory to guide their practice and research.  The Nursology leaders will collaborate with the American Academy of Nursing to organize a conference similar to the Wingspread Conference. The American Nurses Credentialing Center will collaborate with the Magnet Recognition Program©® to require hospitals to have a nursing theory as the foundation for achieving Magnet©® Status Recognition.