Rhetaugh Etheldra Graves Dumas (1926 – 2007)*

Guardian of the Discipline

Rhetaugh Etheldra Graves Dumas was an esteemed nursing “leader with vision, insight, and wise counsel who had a major impact in the advancement of nursing, health care, and academic programs.“ She was inspired to become a nurse because of her mother, who wanted to be a nurse but could not because schools of nursing did not admit African American women at that time. Dr. Dumas earned her BSN degree from Dillard University in New Orleans in 1951, Her nursing career began as a school nurse in the segregated schools of Natchez, Mississippi. With a strong determination to improve the welfare of others, she went on to earn her master’s degree in psychiatric nursing from Yale University in 1961. In1975, when nursing doctorates were rare, she earned her doctoral degree in social psychology from the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities (now known as Union Institute & University).

Throughout her career, she was a strong advocate for Black  women and Black nurses, urging baccalaureate nursing education for all.  Dr. Dumas was the “first” in many dimensions related to the development of nursing as a discipline.  She was the first nurse to conduct clinical experiments that evaluated nursing practices. She was the first African-American to be named as a Dean of Nursing, University of Michigan (1981). She was subsequently appointed as Vice-Provost of the University, serving until her retirement.

Most notably,, she was the first woman and first nurse to serve as deputy director of the National Institute of Mental Health, from 1979-1981. As President of the American Academy of Nursing (1987-89), she led the establishment of Expert Panels to develop strong policy statements based on nursing expertise.  She began her presidency with the motto of “many voices, one vision,” calling on expansion of the Academy as a major force in shaping the future of healthcare.  Her vision for the Expert Panels was a way she saw to substantially engage nurse scholars in bringing nursing perspectives and expertise to the policy-making table.  Today over 20 Expert Panels of the Academy provide vital leadership driving research and policy that is  grounded in the values of the discipline of nursing.

I had the distinct privilege of working with Dr. Dumas as a member of the Board of Directors of the Academy when she was President.  Her clarity, strength of vision, and unrelenting commitment to nursing as a discipline remains as a major influence that inspired me, as a young scholar, to never waiver from a commitment to the very best that nursing offers in the service of others.

See more information about Dr. Dumas here and here

* Portions of this post originally appeared on the NurseManifest blog

Nursing Journal Editors 2019 Annual Conference: A report

Introduction by Peggy L Chinn, Editor, Advances in Nursing Science

Every year for the past 38 years, nursing journal editors have met to discuss issues in publishing and editing, challenges in the discipline that influence nursing literature, and to educate ourselves to maintain the highest standards of journalism in nursing.  The conference is planned, hosted and conducted by volunteer journal editors who are members of the International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE).

This year was no exception – we heard from experts about the latest developments that influence how people find and use our literature, the emerging trends in scholarly publishing, including the  latest developments in standards for scholarly writing and ways of attributing cited works, and thought-provoking discussions of the nature of “evidence” and the ways in which our nursing literature provides knowledge, facts and insights that shape nursing practice.  You can see details of the program here.

Nursology.net was very visible at this year’s conference – this is the first year of the INANE conferences since the website was established in September 2018!  We provided ball point pens for all participants, and each speaker received a gift of a Nursology.net tote bag!  We also provided a breakout session and a poster to make sure that everyone at the conference knew the wonderful resource that is now available on the website for our journals and their readers!

Several of us who are on the Nursology.net management team were in attendance – here are some of our reflections:

Jane Flanagan – Editor, International Journal of Nursing Knowledge

As always, I enjoyed this conference because I see my editor friends, we have fun and I learn so much. Editing is sort of a solo act. The journal has your name on it and you want to put out the best product, but its an industry and with that are constant changes. And keeping up – well that is done at odd hours of the night because it is something we all fit in to our busy schedules. This lends itself to lots of moments where you think: “I wonder if anyone has ever dealt with this or that sort of issue”.  Thus the INANE annual conference where we can bring our questions.  It  is a low key event and because of that, we share openly.  We learn so much from each other and it creates a situation where we are part of something bigger than just the journal we edit. I find I always pick up many pearls of wisdom at the annual conference. I presented with Peggy Chinn on nursology at this conference. In a comedy of errors, Jacqui Fawcett was supposed to be with us, but could not get out to Reno due to storms. She had our poster. No worries, we just presented using our computer, which in that space worked.  Then there was the podium presentation and alas, the wrong PowerPoints were loaded and the Internet that was so vital to our presentation refused to cooperate so we winged it. No problem in this audience. They adapted to whatever we did, asked great questions and a wonderful dialogue ensued.  That’s INANE – no pressure, just collegial support.  Lastly, I want to make a plug for the auto museum in Reno – a pleasant surprise and brilliant choice for a reception – lots of laughs and amazing collection of cars – who knew? Already looking forward to Nashville!

Marlaine Smith – Advisory Board, Advances in Nursing Science

This was my first INANE Conference and I had a fabulous time.  It was a gathering of about 160 editors and publishers of nursing journals. I consider these women and men to be the current guardians of our disciplinary literature.  It is such an important responsibility.  They and their editorial boards and reviewers shape the visible and accessible knowledge of our discipline. I found the presentations to be informative, and most importantly very open and collegial.  The sessions were peppered with lots of dialogue.

I was honored to give one of the ending keynotes…title was “In Search of Knowledge for Nursing Praxis Beyond Evidence”.  I reviewed the literature from the 90s to present that critiqued our fascination, if not obsession, with “evidence-based practice”.  While EBP is important, “evidence”, as commonly thought of,  is not the only or most important knowledge to inform nursing practice. We need an epistemology for nursing praxis that is founded on the philosophies and theories of nursology and includes the depth and diversity of all patterns of knowing.  Editors, editorial boards, reviewers, faculty and practice leaders can be influential in several ways: 1) Adopt a balanced perspective on what is worthy of publication – one  that values all patterns of knowing; 2) Include in criteria for reviewers some connection to nursing’s disciplinary focus; for example, “How does this manuscripts contribute to knowledge of the human health experience?” or ”How does this author express a value for nursing’s disciplinary knowledge, that is the philosophical and theoretical perspectives of the discipline? Are relevant nursing theories cited? Reviewers and editors should review references with an eye toward the inclusion of sources from nurse authors and nursing journals; 3) Foster the development of new epistemic forms to inform praxis.  How do we develop literacies for understanding the wholeness of the human health experience? How do we develop, teach and encourage a praxis epistemology that integrates multiple sources of knowledge; and 4) Nursing research and evidence-based practice projects should be grounded in the disciplinary perspective and nursing theory.  As we guide students and review manuscripts, we need to consider what nursing theories are relevant to the studies or projects that are not cited?

Kudos to Leslie Nicoll, Peggy Chinn and the planning committee for pulling off this amazing conference in Reno.

W. Richard Cowling III – Editor, Journal of Holistic Nursing

This was my first INANE conference and there was much to impress, but my two main high points were the Nursology and the COPE sessions. The dialogue in the Nursology session reflected in many ways a great yearning for elaborating the distinctiveness of nursing through advancing knowledge based on nursing theory models. At the same time, I realized that much has been lost in the past few decades with the distraction of nursing toward medically based models of care. Some equate nursing theory and knowledge with particular conceptual and theoretical frameworks rather than the potentials to advance human betterment through the theoretical thinking nurses bring to health care because of there peculiarly essential relationships with persons, families, and communities. The COPE sessions struck me as invaluable from my perspective as a journal editor and writer because of the way the complexities of ethical issues pervade the publishing world. What the COPE leaders and community bring to this is a rich dialogue and exchange the uncovers new ways of understanding ethical issues as they impact writing and scholarship more broadly.

Jacqui Fawcett – Reviewer and advisor for several major nursing journals

My adventure for INANE 2019 encompassed

  • On July 30, A flight from my local airport in Rockland, Maine, to Boston–on time departure and arrival
  • On July 30, A flight from Boston to Denver–on time departure, arrival 4 hours late due to diversion to Cheyenne, Wyoming due to thunderstorms and wind in Denver and need for refueling
  • A cancelled flight from Denver to Reno
  • On July 30, A return “red eye” flight from Denver to Boston–slightly delayed departure due to waiting for other passengers, close to on time arrival in Boston very early in the morning of July 31.

Inasmuch as I would not have been able to get to Reno until (hopefully) some time on July 31 and, therefore, would have missed a session I was scheduled to moderate and at least the poster session and perhaps the paper  I was to present with Peggy Chinn and Jane Flanagan, and the cost of a hotel room in Denver for the night of July 30 was outrageous, I decided to return to Boston on July 30.

Thus, I  regretfully never did get to Reno for INANE 2019.

Fortunately, Peggy and Jane did get to Reno and presented our poster and paper.  Given the convenience of electronic communication (email), I was able to send the final version of our presentation to Peggy and Jane as soon as I arrived in Boston very early on July 31.

Furthermore, Leslie Nicoll was able to find someone else serve as the moderator for the session I was supposed to moderate. I thank Leslie and whoever filled in as the moderator for me.

I look forward to actually attending an INANE meeting in the near future!

Leslie Nicoll – Planning Committee and all-around INANE Gadfly! Editor, CIN (Computers Informatics Nursing) and Nurse Author & Editor

Jacqui–I look forward to seeing you at the INANE Conference next year–everyone, put it on your calendar: INANE 2020, Nashville, TN, August 2-5, 2020.

I have been a journal editor since 1995 and attended my first INANE that summer–in London. I was a happy participant for many years but in 2014, when we hosted the conference in Portland, ME, I became truly committed to the cause (it is a cause as we are all volunteers!) and have worked very hard to “raise the bar” for INANE. Every year people say, “This is the best INANE ever!” and then we try to top it the next year–and have managed to do so for 6 years. It is important that we continually push ourselves in terms of the content that is presented, because as Marlaine noted, the women and men in attendance are the “guardians of the disciplinary literature.” As such, we have a responsibility to ensure that we are adhering to best standards of scholarly publication; dealing appropriately with ethical issues that might arise; communicating  effectively with all stakeholders–not just authors; and being “ahead of the curve” on current trends and innovations that will impact our work and publications.

As a key planner for INANE, I work hard to put together a conference which includes keynote sessions, panel discussions, breakout and poster sessions, plus time for networking. This is all done to meet the key responsibilities noted above. This year’s conference was no exception. Our keynote speakers included two nurses, a physician, and a librarian (with a prior career in nursing) who brought diverse points of view to share with the audience. Breakout sessions and posters tend to be from those more directly involved in INANE and are a wonderful way to learn about emerging research and the day-to-day editorial work of our peers .

I believe it is important to provide stimulation to the right side of brains (which opens the left side for maximum learning!) and we do this at INANE with our opening gala speaker. This year, Carolyn Dufurenna, who describes herself as a “rancher and poet,” joined us to get the show on the road (literally) and for me, she was a highlight. Everyone else was great, too, but Carolyn just added a little extra flair. She loved speaking at INANE and would welcome future invitations to present to nurses. Keep that in mind if you are planning a conference in the Reno or nearby!

Maybe the best thing about INANE is that it is big enough to stimulate lots of discussion, but small enough so that everyone feels like they have a chance to meet everyone else. It is certainly the highlight of my year–I am already looking forward to Nashville! I hope to re-connect with many friends but also have the chance to make new friends. To those reading this who don’t know me–I look forward to meeting you at INANE!

 

 

Report of the 17th Biennial International Neuman Systems Model Symposium

Thank you to guest bloggers Karen Gehrling and Lora L .Wyss for this report!  Scroll down for guest blogger information.

Erin Maughan delivering Keynote Address on Population Health Friday, Malone University

On June 20-21, 2019, approximately 100 nurse scholars gathered in Canton, Ohio for the 17th Biennial International Neuman Systems Model (NSM) Symposium. Colleagues from around the world gathered to share knowledge and expertise in population health and the Neuman Systems Model (NSM).

The keynote speaker, Dr. Erin Maughan, shared significant population health issues and the importance of using models of care as context for interventions. Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett, an expert on conceptual models of nursing, built on the keynote to discuss a NSM perspective of the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Population Health. Podium and poster presentations focused on the application of the NSM for education, research, and practice within the context of various worldwide population health issues.

Dr. Fawcett delivering Plenary Address Malone University

On Thursday evening, at Walsh University, we were inspired by Dr. Betty Neuman, who sent videotaped greetings and encouragement to the participants for moving the use

Global Café discussion led by DeLyndia Green Walsh University

of the NSM forward. Global café discussions provided an opportunity to dialogue about population health issues directly affecting a variety of client systems. On Friday, at Malone University, attendees continued the dialogue and began forging new connections and collaborations between colleagues from across the nation and Europe. Many of the NSM Fellows and grant recipients discussed the application of the NSM as guides for their research, education, or practice work. We will be posting many of the presentations on the Nursology.net 2019 conference page as soon as they become available!

Neuman Systems Model Fellows and Grant recipients: (L-R: Fatma Mataoui, Mickie Schuerger, Dawn Pla, Dwaine Thomas, Obiageli Obah, Marcia Jones-George)

Here are reflections from a few of the Symposium attendees:

Reception Walsh University

Mary Cook, from North Canton, OH, wrote: What a great opportunity to network with nursologists who not only know the Neuman Systems Model (NSM), but truly live (practice) the model. I was amazed at how “easily” some of the conference attendees and presenters on the first day during the Global Café discussions were able to extemporaneously frame shared comments within the NSMl. I was again awed by the presentations, both poster and podium, on the second day in relation to application of the NSM to diverse phenomena. It was overwhelming yet inspiring to witness the respect not only for the model but for the work of Dr. Neuman, Dr. Fawcett, Neuman Systems Trustees, and Fellows. I have had exposure to many of the nursing theories but have not had an opportunity to truly apply one model in my practice. What a great example of how theory can be and is used to guide daily nursing practice.
Mary Cook added: I had the privilege of organizing and overseeing the Silent Auction that is the fundraising portion of each Neuman Systems Model Symposium. There were numerous items donated but the two that commanded the most attention and competitive bidding were framed photos of Dr. Betty Neuman and Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett. Wow! What excitement over the possibility of owning a photo that represented so much to so many! The mentorship provided by these outstanding nursologists is astounding! We must continue mentoring and exploring effective strategies for engaging nursing students (undergraduate and graduate) as well as nurses at all levels of practice in theory application.

DeLyndia Green-Laughlin, from Baton Rouge, LA, wrote: The Neuman Systems Model Symposium was amazing as always, with forward thinking scholars working in collaboration to envision a brighter tomorrow. In this time of globalization, assessing population health through the lens of the NSM could not have been more appropriate. Having been a former school nurse myself, I cared for students and families in a time immediately after Hurricane Katrina. As our keynote speaker, Dr. Erin Maughan compared the Public Health Model with the Neuman Systems Model, I was reminded of the reconstitution the community experienced during the aftermath of the storm. As we had to work through the intra, inter, and extrapersonal stressors toward healing, addressing all five interacting variables was the keys to becoming whole again. In sharing the lived experience with families whose community was destroyed as a result of this environmental stressor, the NSM holds true for its use in the community. I was so excited to hear the many presentations during the symposium. Use of the NSM as a framework to address the opioid crisis that has devastated our nation, the impact caregiving will have on the community in the upcoming years, and our educators structuring their assignments within the model were a part of the breakout sessions. Dr. Neuman, thank you for your contribution to the Profession of Nursing.

Colleagues from The Netherlands attending the Symposium

Wichert Trip, an attendee from Zwolle, The Netherlands: Looking back at the NSM congress a couple of things popped out. Since 3 years I know of the existences of the NSM. I consider myself a freshman. I was overwhelmed by the magnitude of the concept. Not only is it applicable on a single patient, it’s very suitable for communities as well. As a community nurse I saw the NSM from a new perspective. That made my excited and I’m going to integrate the NSM into the minor Connecting Community Professional at Viaa University. I’m looking forward to the next congress!

Foekje Pol-Roorda, an attendee from The Netherlands: “A child with asthma must use his inhaler. But what if the mold grows on the walls at home? Or if the medication is not collected from the pharmacy during the holidays?” This example appealed to me in particular. I often draw students’ attention to the client system, but I also often refrain from making them aware of using inter, intra and extra personal factors to get a good picture of the situation. I myself give a lot of lessons in the minor Palliative care. The congress and the example above made me aware that we can look much more through the NSM and implement it even more in the Minor. And I think that this is an important purpose of a conference: improving education, improving professional practice. Personally, this congress has certainly given me an impulse to make the NSM an integrated part of my daily practice.

Ferdy Pluck, Poster Presenter, from Utrecht, The Netherlands, Malone University

Guest bloggers

Karen Gehrling, RN, PhD

Dr. Gehrling, a Neuman Systems Model Trustee since 1999, is a faculty member at  Walsh University Byers School of Nursing. She has been using the NSM to guide her scholarly work and educational endeavors for many years. In 2016, Dr. Gehrling received the Neuman Award, “established in honor of Dr. Betty Neuman for her distinguished contributions to the nursing profession and given annually to a member of the nursing profession who has made significant contributions to the profession as a nursing educator, leader or clinician. ‘Karen is an outstanding leader in nursing theory development and nursing education,’ said 2015 Neuman Award Recipient Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett, who presented the award to Dr. Gehrling. ‘She is a superb scholar with a record of numerous important papers published in top-ranked peer-review journals and important books, as well as many presentations on timely topics at regional, national and international conferences. Most of all, Karen is an outstanding scholar of the Neuman Systems Model.’ Her areas of interests with the Neuman Systems Model include developing a theory of reconstitution, helping nursing programs and curriculum development utilize the Neuman Model, helping students focus on family communication techniques and health promotion while using Neuman as a framework and the family as client, and most recently while consulting in Colombia South America, learning about the need to translate Neuman’s work into Spanish.” Retrieved from https://www.walsh.edu/nursing-research-day-2016-recap

Lora L .Wyss, PhD,  APRN-CNS

Lora Wyss earned Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from George Mason University in Fairfax VA, a school nurse certification from Ashland University, and a PhD from the University of Akron. Currently, she teaches nursing full time at Malone University. Beyond her teaching responsibilities, Lora is the President of the Hartville Migrant Ministry Board as well as the nursing director of the medical clinic. Latino migrant farm workers who sought treatment at the center were the subject of her doctoral dissertation and of her outgoing research. Lora has studied the impacts of culture, economic hardship, gender, isolation, and status as barriers to medical treatment.

 

Roy Adaptation Association – International (RAA-I): 2019 Annual Conference Report

Debra Hanna, inducted as first President of RAA-I, June 8, 2019

We welcome this report contributed by Debra R. Hanna, President, RAA-I.  For additional information about the conference, and to download selected presentations, see the Nursology.net past conference page here.

Members of the Roy Adaptation Association—International gathered in Los Angeles, California on June 7 and 8, 2019 for their annual conference. This year’s conference theme was “Adaptation Towards Transformation for the Future.”
The conference opened with a lively, intriguing presentation by Dr. Scott Ziehm from University of San Francisco, California. His presentation “The State of Nursing Science through the DNP and PhD lens: Historical Perspectives and Future Directions” aptly set the stage for two workshops that followed. Dr. Ellen Buckner from Samford University, Alabama, conducted a dynamic workshop on Knowledge for DNP education. Dr. Debra Hanna from Molloy College in New York, and Drs. Alejandra Alvarado and Maria Elisa Moreno-Fergusson from Universidad de la Sabana in Chia, Colombia conducted a second workshop on Knowledge for PhD Education. The workshops were followed by the Awards ceremony for presenters of Award-winning papers. That afternoon, attendees enjoyed a relaxing reception during the poster session.

The second conference day opened with a networking breakfast, where Executive Board member Dr. Pamela Senasac guided attendees in an enjoyable ice-breaker exercise. A spirit of welcoming hospitality has always characterized our annual RAA-I conferences, so the ice-breaker exercise was in keeping with our long-established organizational persona. RAA-I Executive Board members hope to always preserve the spirit of genuine welcome to every colleague that wishes to join us.
Sr. Callista Roy gave an inspiring keynote speech: “Adaptation Towards Transformation for the Future.” After a short coffee break, the conference resumed with presentations of award-winning papers.

The Susan Pollack Award went to Melissa Lord, DNP, Jennifer Hunt, DNP and Ellen Buckner, PhD for their study: Promoting Adaptation in Female Inmates to Reduce Risk of Opioid Overdose Post-Release through [project] HOPE. The Lizzie Whetsell Award went to Britton Buckner and Ellen Buckner, PhD, for their work using the Roy Adaptation Model to facilitate child adaptation in refugee-camps. The Carol Baer Award went to Luis Carlos Rodriguez Chanis and Yolanda Gonzalez, PhD of Panama, for their study of people living with chronic heart failure. The General and Mrs. Huberto Valesco Award went to Drs. Alejandra Alvarado Garcia and Blanca Venegas for their research to develop coping strategies within a group of chronically ill elderly adults. The last award was recently established as a memorial for one of our late RAA-I colleagues from Colombia. The Maria Elena Lopez award went to Beverly Kass, DNP, of New Jersey for her study that addressed caregiver coping with role strain.
During the annual Business Meeting the Leadership Mentoring program was described. Nine new mentees were matched with eight mentors in a short ceremony. Three newly elected officers of RAA-I were inducted: Dr. Debra Hanna, President, 2019-2012; Dr. Clare Butt, Treasurer, 2019-2021; Dr. Ellen Buckner, Secretary, 2019-2022. Sr. Callista Roy reported that Dr. Sumiko Tsuhako, our well-loved Executive Board member and First President of RAA-Japan has decided to step down from these roles after more than 13 years. Several colleagues from Japan were present at this year’s conference with very good news about the formation at St. Mary’s College in Fukuoka, Japan of a wonderful new nursing research center. From the photos they shared with attendees, we saw that the Roy Academia Nursology Research Center is located in Roy Academia Hall at St. Mary’s College. Transformation for the future of RAA-I was evident in several ways this year.

Our next annual conference for RAA-I will be held in Los Angeles, California on June 19, 20, 2020. The theme for the 2020 conference is: Roy Adaptation Model: Contributions to Authentic Nursing Knowledge. The Call for Abstracts will be released soon.

Mount St. Mary’s University Los Angeles, California.
Photo retrieved from https://www.msmu.edu/about-the-mount/nursing-theory/roy-adaptation-association/conference/

A Theory of Parental Post-Adoption Depression: What’s New is New Again

Welcome to guest blogger Karen J. Foli, PhD, RN, FAAN,
Associate Professor,
Director, PhD in Nursing Program
Purdue University School of Nursing
Here she discusses the challenges of interacting with public media
about her theory of parental post-adoption depression (PAD)

Recently, I was contacted by journalists from Denmark and the New York Times. In both cases, they wanted to interview me about my middle range theory of parental terpost-adoption depression (PAD). I was honored to be asked about my work, but what struck me was a feeling of déjà vu. When my book, The Post-Adoption Blues: Overcoming the Unforeseen Challenges of Adoption (2004 and co-authored by John Thompson) was published and then followed by several empirically driven papers published in peer-reviewed journals (see references below), the press was out en masse.

It’s tricky talking to the press. I’ve made my share of mistakes and learned with every interview I’ve given. But back to the content of these interviews – parental post-adoption depression. The first questions I can count on are: “How does this compare with postpartum depression? What about hormonal changes? How common is PAD?” First, I try to explain that we now see postpartum depression as encompassing the perinatal time period. I describe how we really don’t know about hormonal changes with adoptive parents, but there are differences in the experiences of these two parent groups. In terms of prevalence, we’re not sure – my best estimate is 10% to 20% of adoptive parents may experience depressive symptoms.

Adoptive parents reach into society for a license to parent a child born to others. They go through a rigorous, invasive process during which they are waiting, and ultimately matched with an infant or child. Often, parents “sell” themselves as “super parents,” beings that set themselves up with high, often unrealistic expectations. Herein lies the heart of my theory: unmet expectations of themselves as parent, of their child, of family and friends, and of society and others, are associated with depressive symptoms. Based on my research, expectations of themselves are the hardest to meet.

The question becomes: how do nurses and nursology fit into this? Based on my research and writing (see also Nursing Care of Adopted and Kinship Families: A Clinical Guide for Advanced Practice Nurses), the answer is more than you would suppose. Social work is the historical and current default profession that we defer to when children are relinquished and for home studies that evaluate the fitness of adoptive parents. Yet we understand that adoptive children visit healthcare providers more frequently than birth children. Herein lies our opportunity as care providers to support families.

Many adoptive parents experience significant shame when they struggle with PAD. Sometimes, when they share their feelings, they will be met with: “But isn’t this what you’ve wanted?” Nurses in myriad specialty areas can make a positive impact. Pediatric nurses can assess the dynamics between the child and parent and look for cues of impaired or delayed bonding. Nurses providing care to older adults can also assess for PAD – relative placements in foster care and in informal arrangements are surging (also known as kinship caregivers). Primary care providers have multiple opportunities to look for signs of parental depressive symptoms post-adoption and ask about expectations that were or were not met.

To end, when parents experience depression, we know the kids suffer too. Nurses can be savvy caregivers to this special and vulnerable group of parents and their children. While this blog is too brief to relay all that we know about PAD, it’s a welcomed beginning.

References

Foli, K. J., Lim, E., & South, S. C. (2017). Longitudinal analyses of adoptive parents’ expectations and depressive symptoms. Research in Nursing and Health, 40(6), 564-574. doi: 10.1002/nur.21838

Foli, K. J., Hebdon, M., Lim, E., & South, S. C. (2017). Transitions of adoptive parents: A longitudinal mixed methods analysis. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing31(5), 483-492. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2017.06.007

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., Lim, E., & Jarnecke, A. (2016). Post-adoption depression: Parental classes of depressive symptoms across time. Journal of Affective Disorders200, 293-302. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.01.049

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., Lim, E., & Hebdon, M. (2016). Longitudinal course of risk for parental post-adoption depression using the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised.  Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 45(2), 210-226doi:10.1016/j.jogn.2015.12.011

Foli, K. J., Lim, E., South, S. C., & Sands, L. P. (2014). “Great expectations” of adoptive parents: Theory extension through structural equation modeling. Nursing Research, 63(1), 14-25. doi: 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000006

Foli, K.J., South, S.C., & Lim, E. (2014). Maternal postadoption depression: Theory refinement through qualitative content analysis. Journal of Research in Nursing, 19(4), 303-327. doi: 10.1177/1744987112452183

South, S. C., Foli, K. J., & Lim, E. (2013). Predictors of relationship satisfaction in adoptive mothers. The Journal of Social and Personal Relationships30(5), 545-563. doi: 10.1177/0265407512462681

Foli, K. J., Schweitzer, R., & Wells, C. (2013).  The personal and professional: Nurses’ lived experiences of adoption. The American Journal of
Maternal/Child Nursing, 38
(2), 79-86. doi: 10.1097/NMC.0b013e3182763446

Foli, K. J. South, S. C., Lim, E., & Hebdon, M. (2013). Depression in adoptive fathers: An exploratory mixed methods study. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 14(4), 411-422. doi: 10.1037/a0030482

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., Lim, E., & Hebdon, M. (2012). Maternal postadoption depression, unmet expectations, and personality traits. Journal of the American
Psychiatric Nurses Association
18(5), 267-277. doi: 10.1177/1078390312457993

Foli, K. J. (2012). Nursing care of the adoption triad. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 48(4), 208-217. doi: 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2012.00327.x

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., & Lim, E. (2012). Rates and predictors of depression in adoptive mothers: Moving toward theory. Advances in Nursing Science35(1),
51-63. doi:10.1097/ANS.0b013e318244553e

Foli, K. J., & Gibson, G. C. (2011).  Training ‘adoption smart’ professionals.  Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 18(5), 463-467. doi:  10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01715.x

Foli, K. J. & Gibson, G. C. (2011).  Sad adoptive dads:  Paternal depression in the post-adoption period,International Journal of Men’s Health10(2), 153-162. doi: 10.3149/jmh.1002.153

Foli, K.J. (2010). Depression in adoptive parents: A model of understanding through grounded theory. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 32, 379-400. doi: 10.1177/0193945909351299

Foli, K. J. (2009). Postadoption depression: What nurses should know. American Journal of Nursing, 109, 11. doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000357144.17002.d3

What makes a theory or model “nursing”?

To our readers: the Nursology.net blog exists to prompt thoughtful discussion of critical issues related to the development of nursing knowledge.  We welcome your thoughts, challenges, alternative points of view, and critical questions!  Do not hesitate to comment on this or any other post at any time!  You are our “peer reviewers” and your perspectives contribute to all in our nursology.net community!

I am often asked (as are many of my colleagues):  What makes a theory or model a nursing theory or model?  This question is close to the challenge that I addressed in my keynote address in March at the Case Western Reserve Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Theory conference.  This question deserves serious reflection and discussion, because how each of us responds to this question is at the heart of what we envision for our discipline moving forward. In my keynote, I noted that various definitions of nursing as a discipline point to two essential matters: 1) knowledge of the human health experience, and 2) knowledge of nursing healing [well-becoming] actions.  Here I explore the issue of nursing theories and models, and propose that like the definitions, nursing theories and models are characterized by a focus on these same two essential characteristics.

One reason that questions concerning the nature of nursing theory keep surfacing is the fact that so many nurses who embarked on activities related to the development of nursology (nursing science) were educated to be scholars (researchers, theory developers) in fields outside of, but related to nursing.  There are contemporary nurses who opt to pursue their preparation for scholarship in other disciplines, influenced by the appeal of certain lines of inquiry that are already well developed in another discipline, and recognizing the significant connection between nursing’s interests and the interests of other lines of thought.  When I say “related” what I mean is that the gaze of these other disciplines is certainly pertinent to what concerns nursing, but the central concern of nursology is not actually “at the center.”  When a nurse scholar’s central focus is on the periphery, it is likely to be better placed within the scope of another discipline.

Sally Thorne (2014) has addressed this tension often in her work, most specifically in her chapter that appears in the text “Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatory Nursing.” In this chapter titled “A Case for Emancipatory Disciplinary Theorizing” (pages 79-90), Dr. Thorne pointed to the habits of “false dichotomizing” and the allure of borrowing theories from other disciplines, both of which lead to valorizing constructions from other disciplines, while neglecting the distinct focus of nursing. False dichotomizing, in the the case of social justice concerns, is the tendency to pigeon-hole a theory as either being focused on “the individual” or on “the community” (social justice), failing to recognize that from the earliest days of theorizing in nursing, scholars have explicitly embraced both the individual and the community and the  social injustices that require nursing action.  Likewise, immersion in and borrowing from the theoretical traditions of other disciplines can lead to neglect of the complex social mandate that is central to the discipline of nursing.  Unlike other disciplines, many of which focus on building knowledge as an end in itself, nursing’s mandate to act shifts the disciplinary focus so that knowledge related to a phenomena must include a focus, or point the way to “right” or “good” nursing action.  I have addressed the challenge in nursing of developing theory with this extremely complex perspective as one of the reasons for turning to theory in other disciplines, where the focus is more limited, and this complexity is typically unacknowledged and undeveloped or underdeveloped.  (see “Thoughts About Advancement of the Discipline: Dark Clouds and Bright Lights”)

From my perspective, regardless of the theorist’s background, or the origin of methodological approaches, what defines a theoretical construction as nursing arises from a clear orientation to the values and priorities of the discipline – the direction in which nursologists focus their “gaze.”  The focus of nursing must include the two elements that centrally define our discipline: knowledge of the human health experience, and knowledge of nursing actions leading to health and well-becoming.

Every discipline has the right and the responsibility to define and to conceptualize its own knowledge, domain, practice – the field which it covers. Of course people from other disciplines, and the public, have a responsibility to challenge the discipline in any way that is needed – a process that contributes to the ongoing development of the discipline. This process was prominent during the early phases of feminist thought in which feminist scholars from all disciplines developed a “gaze” focused on the rights and well-being of women, challenged the parameters, assumptions and practices of their own, and other disciplines as well. This led to vast changes for the better in all of the sciences and the humanities.

Where nursing is concerned, or more specifically nursology, disciplinary knowledge must derive from those who have been immersed in the history, philosophy, theory, and the practices of the discipline – something that is required for any discipline. Even though, for example, I do know a lot about the field of educational psychology where I earned my PhD degree and where I completed many courses in psychology and educational psychology, I do not have the background and experience to even begin to claim that I could contribute to the knowledge base of that discipline. I have used theories and insights from other disciplines in my own work contributing to the discipline of nursing, but that is quite a different kind of scholarship than would be required to contribute to the discipline of psychology (or sociology, or anthropology, etc.). My own theorizing in nursing reflects my educational psychology background, particularly the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Friere.  While the very relevant focus of Friere’s work is on human liberation from oppressive conditions, in my work the focus shifts to the health experience involved in group interactions,  conditions which influence, perhaps even threaten human health and well-being.  Health-promoting group interactions in my work draw on the methods of Friere’s  liberation theory,  but are specifically directed toward creating group actions and interactions that are life-affirming, nurturing, and support human well-becoming.

I do not think it is helpful to dwell on the simple fact of whether or not a person contributing to the knowledge of the discipline is a nurse — not all nurses are prepared to contribute to the knowledge base of the discipline, nor should they be expected to. And there are certainly nurses whose “gaze” is directed primarily on phenomena that are rooted in other disciplines.  The key to me is where a theory or model focuses the gaze – what phenomena are central, and are those central ideas consistent with the defining focus of the discipline.  I find it difficult to imagine how someone could contribute to nursing knowledge without a nursing background, or without experience in nursing healing/ well-becoming actions, as well as a background in the history and foundational knowledge of the discipline.  Beyond this essential background from which the theoretical ideas emerge, nursing theories and models are defined by the substantive focus on the phenomena of the experience of human health and well-being, and the dynamics that contribute to nursing healing and well-becoming practices.   As we have demonstrated in gathering together for this website information about the theories and models we do have, there are many more than many nurses have as yet imagined!  But the task of clearing our mental images to more fully appreciate the possibilities in the development of the knowledge of our discipline is a huge challenge, and further focusing our gaze on these possibilities and priorities is at the heart of what matters for our own discipline.

Moving Towards the Next Fifty Years Together

We are delighted to welcome guest bloggers representing the  Nursing Theory Collective
formed March 2019 Case Western Reserve
Nursing Theory Conference:
Chloe Littzen, Jane Hopkins Walsh  and Jessica Dillard Wright

I. Introduction

Chloe Littzen

Jessica Dillard-Wright (L) and Jane Hopkins-Walsh (R)

In March 2019, 130 nurses from all over the world gathered at Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio for Nursing Theory: A 50 Year Perspective, Past, and Future, a landmark conference to celebrate the history of nursing theory and elicit discussion for the future of nursing. The attendees were diverse, comprised of seasoned nursing theorists and doctoral students in equal measure, participating in lively and thoughtful conversation across many domains. The future of nursing theory quickly emerged as a critical issue as nurses working at all levels of expertise expressed their concern over the loss of nursing theory at the institutional level, both academic and clinical. What is at stake in this erosion is discipline-specific nursing knowledge, in particular at this 50-year juncture as the great theorists of nursing like Drs. Peggy Chinn, Joyce Fitzpatrick, Pamela Reed, Callista Roy, Marlaine Smith, and many others approach the end of their illustrious careers. The question resonated, “who will carry the nursing theory torch forward?”

To advance the discipline of nursing, the next wave of nursing theorists and thought leaders must actively engage to advance nursing theory, improve nursing praxis, and articulate nursing’s identity leading our profession into the future. This is the rallying cry that led to the blog post you are reading today. In follow-up to this conference, doctoral student Chloe Littzen engaged other students who attended to embark on a collaborative effort to articulate our vision for the future of nursing theory. What follows is a brief discussion of our course so far, the background, plan, and desired outcomes for convening a nursing theory working group as we envision the next fifty years of nursing theory and beyond.

lI. Background

After the landmark conference concluded, a collaborative effort ensued to form a theory working group focused on promoting nursing theory and advancing nursing’s identity. This group is comprised of both scholars and students and is open to all nurses practicing in all settings. Our first meeting was held online via video-conferencing on May 18th, with a total of six participants from Arizona, Massachusetts, and West Virginia. This first meeting was an experimental think-tank where we considered ideas about the future of nursing and our professional identity. Below, we outline our mission and vision for this nursing theory working group.

III. Plan

The primary mission, as established by our working group, is to promote nursing theory and advance the identity of nursing through knowledge development for all nurses in all settings, including practice, education, research, and policy. As a group, we believe that nursing and nursing theory are dynamic and evolving to meet the needs of an increasingly complex healthcare landscape and global environment. In order to keep nursing theory and nursing relevant and current, thinking about theory must be on-going and iterative, with a continuous cycle of critique, testing, and scholarship. Failure to seriously engage these questions has dire consequences for nursing theory and the profession as nursing as it slowly cedes its identity to the economic pressures of the healthcare environment and the supremacy of biomedicine.

The following bullets summarize our discussion and desired outcomes from the first nursing theory workgroup meeting:

  • Discussion Points:
    1. We need a plan to sustain and evolve nursing theory and nursing’s identity with discipline-specific knowledge.
    2. Nursing theory must be derived from and applicable to the practice environment, not just academia.
    3. The purpose of nursing theory must be clarified for nursing practice, education, research, and policy.
    4. Nurses in clinical practice must have an educational foundation grounded in nursing theory that empowers the application of theory in practice.
    5. Nursing students must be educated and mentored in nursing theory, beginning at the pre-licensure level.
    6. This discussion must include considerations of how nursing theory is taught in the academic environment and how that can be linked to and informed by nursing practice.
    7. The need for nursing theory is global, making this an international, even planetary problem.
  • Desired Outcomes:
    1. To write a manuscript demystifying nursing theory for the nurse in the practice environment.
    2. Write a second manuscript demystifying nursing theory for the nurse educator in academia.
    3. Explore the potential of a future study identifying and describing the barriers and facilitators for using nursing theory in practice, education, research, and policy settings.
    4. Share the discussions, experiences, and findings with the community at Nursology.net.

IV. Invitation – Join us!

While we are a new workgroup, we welcome and encourage all nurses, both advanced scholars and novice theorists alike, to consider joining us in this journey in promoting nursing and nursing theory into the future. We currently meet monthly over Zoom video-conferencing. If you are interested, please contact form below to be placed on the email list for future meetings and content.

If you are planning to go to the 2019 Collaborative K.I.N.G. conference in Washington D.C. from November 14th-15th, we are planning an in-person meeting to take place. We hope to see you there as we drive nursing and nursing theory into the future. Join us!

With optimism and gratitude for the future,
Nursing Theory Collective
(Final group name pending vote at next meeting)

Footnotes:

See more information on the King Conference here.

See more information on the landmark theory conference at Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne School of Nursing here.

Please use this form to contact us if you want to join us, or for more information!

Why Nursology?: The Perspective of an International PhD Student

Guest contributor: Toqa Alanby

Toqa Alanby

Hello, my name is Toqa Alanby MSN, BSN, RN, from Saudi Arabia, a full-time nursing PhD student in Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University. I have chosen to begin the pursuit of my academic career in Nursing with a sense of determination. Through my B.Sc. in Nursing from Umm Al-Qura University (Mecca, Saudi Arabia), my English program at INTO University of South Florida (Tampa, Florida, US), and my M.Sc. in Nursing from Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin (Dublin, Ireland), I have dedicated my life to advance my nursing knowledge and skills.

I was introduced to the Nursology website by Dean Marlaine Smith, my advisor, as she said, “websites are vehicles to assist us in coming to know an organization.” The Nursology website is a quantum leap in nursing. Nurse scholars, nurses in clinical settings, and postgraduate students, all of them, can be involved by joining or just by browsing this site. It was designed and maintained by nurse scholars with sufficient experience who can enrich the nursing profession throughout the world. For me as an international PhD student who came from a different background, I found it as a repository for sources about nursing conceptual models, grand theories, middle-range theories, and situation-specific theories, philosophies and related methodologies. It is momentous to nursing practice, education and scientific research because it is a guide to what is already known and what further knowledge and skills are required. Also, I found it as a station that can connect to the pioneers of the nursing profession, a link to enable us to communicate with them easily.

Exploring the website, gave me a better understanding about the history of nursing in the United States. Furthermore, it reminded me of how nursing started in Saudi Arabia. In both cases war had an impact on the development of nursing. For instance, the first mention of nursing in Saudi Arabia was during the time of the Prophet Muhammad in the service of the Muslim armies during periods of war. Women accompanied veterans as companions and caretakers. According to Jan (1996) nursing activities carried over into peacetime when the women served as midwives and continued to nurse the sick and dying.  Subsequently nursing concepts emerged to inform this practice.

Nurses, nursing students and other health professionals understand and view nursing differently. Many definitions have been used to define the concept of nursing. Sapountzi-Krepia (2013) justifies this diversity due to different educational backgrounds, cultures and experiences. Now that nursing is based on the interaction with others, caring appears as one of its central concepts. The concept of care emerged during the decade of the 1950’s; however many factors hampered its progress. It was not until two decades later that not only the first National Caring Research Conference but also the publication of Leininger’s and Watson’s theories stimulated the interest of researchers in the concept (Brilowski & Wendler, 2005). Caring seems to be inherent to nursing practice and originates from respect and concern for the patients, which is a skill that evolves with experience. As for my culture, caring from the Islamic perspective refers to a critical, reflective analysis of what we think we know about our universe and ourselves. Saeed (2006) mentioned that the Islamic philosophy is rooted in the attempt to understand reality rationally. The Qur’an, the Holy book of Muslim faith, and the Sunnah, which documents the life and practices of the prophet, built the Islamic belief system.

Outside of the nursing community, when I talk about nursing science, I always have been asked what distinguishes nursing science from other disciplines? Cowling, Smith & Watson. (2008) answered this question by stating that there are 3 fundamental concepts which are wholeness, consciousness, and caring singled out and positioned in the disciplinary discourse of nursing to distinguish it from other disciplines. In my opinion, nursing implies an intentional activity, attitudes and feelings that shape the professional interaction established between nurses and patients.

Having an understanding of these perspectives will inform health professionals to achieve cultural competence and deliver care that is culturally sensitive (Rassool, 2014). Individualized, holistic care can be achieved by apprehending culture, beliefs and ethnicities, and a display of cultural competence. I saw Dr. Sadat Hoseini’s model on the Nursology website as a model that comes from a Muslim perspective. It is wonderful and informative. However, there is a great diversity of cultural, tribal and linguistic groups among Muslim societies, each of which has its own cultural characteristics and worldview of well-being and sickness. Delivering nursing care to Muslim patients means having an insight of Islamic faith and Islamic beliefs. Thus, what goes on in Saudi Arabia is totally different from what Dr. Hoseini’s model looks for. She is from a different culture, country, and doctrine.

Based on my experience, non-Muslim nurses who work in my country are not able to utilize the existing knowledge and framework of health from Islam to enhance the nursing profession. The inability to shape nursing practice, education, and policy from an Islamic perspective can be attributed to multiple factors such as social status of nursing in the country, professional identity of nurses, and societal approval and recognition (Ismail et al., 2015). Therefore, the professional development of nursing among Muslim nurses is based on utilizing Western practice, education, and ethical models instead of integrating the holistic view of Islam (Gharaibeh & Al-Maaitah, 2012). The curricula of our colleges in Saudi Arabia still follow the theories that come from the United States (F. AlShaibany, personal communication, April 25, 2019). Though, in general, the development of nursing theories and models are almost neglected in Saudi Arabia, whether in education or practice. While nursing students know about nursing theories, they most likely don’t see them as a part of their practice. They also tend more to use theories from other disciplines such as change theories instead of nursing theories.

I was eager to explore nursing from another perspective and the Nursology website was a vehicle to achieve this purpose.  The Western concept is the most visible and distinctive in the site. I believe this site will be a real connection for other nurses around the world to the study of Western nursing. Thus, I hope one day to join the great scholars here to advance Nursology forward and perhaps contribute by sharing my theoretical work from a different cultural point of view. My goal is to embark on an academic career and to conduct research.  In other words, scholars absorb and integrate information coming from the world around them as they create their own work. The role they play calls for the development and maintenance of collective learning and comprehension. A scholar’s work, according to Boyer’s (1990) definition, calls for taking a step backwards from the investigation, searching for connection, and bridging the gap between theory and practice while having one’s knowledge communicated effectively (p.16).

Being able to comprehend and associate with nurses of different cultures is vital for nursing advancement. Understanding cultural differences among nursing perspectives is essential. By educating ourselves about different cultures through communication with diverse nurses in conferences, organized meetings, and engagement with a website like Nursology can prepare us well to broaden our perspectives on nursing knowledge from all over the world in multiple cultures.

References

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered. Princeton, NJ: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Brilowski, A., & Wendler, C. (2005). An evolutionary concept analysis of caring. J Adv Nurs (50), 641-50.

Cowling, W.R., Smith, M.C. & Watson, J. (2008). The power of wholeness, consciousness, and caring: A dialogue on nursing science, art, and healing. Advances in Nursing Sciences, 31(1), 41-51.

Alshaibany, F. (2019, April 25). Personal Interview.

Gharaibeh, K. & Al-Maaitah, R. (2012). Islam and Nursing, in Religion, Religious Ethics, and Nursing. Spinger New York, NY. p. 229-249.

Ismail, S., Hatthakit, U., & Chinawong, T. (2015). Caring science within islamic contexts: a literature review. Nurse Media Journal of Nursing, 5(1), 34. doi:10.14710/nmjn.v5i1.10189

Jan, R. (1996). Rufaida Al-Asalmiya, the first Muslim nurse. Image: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 28, 267-268.

Rassool, G. H. (2014). Cultural competence in caring for Muslim patients. Palgrave Macmillan.

Saeed, A. (2006). Islamic Thought: An Introduction. New York, USA: Routledge.

Sapountzi-Krepia, D. (2013). Some thoughts on nursing. Int J Caring Sci (6), 127-133.

Tribute to our Nurse Friends!

We welcome this guest post by Shannon Constantinides, MSN, NP-C, FNP, UCHealth Primary Care,  PhD Student, Florida Atlantic University.  Shannon also contributed the content on Jane Georges’ Theory of Emancipatory Compassion

Shannon Constantinides

In trying to explain to my husband (an osteopathic physician) why Nurses’ Week is an important week, I asked him, “Do you ever notice that I have my “friends” … but that I also have my “nurse friends?” He looked back at me, a bit quizzically, shrugged his shoulders and said, “yeah…? I guess so?” In a conversation a day or so later, he said, “Now that you’ve mentioned it, I guess I have heard you mention your Nurse Friends.” He then gave me a somewhat perplexed look and said, “I have friends who are physicians, but I don’t think I have Physician Friends. At least not in the way you talk about your Nurse Friends.” You’re right, my dear, you don’t.

From the inception of the profession, nurses have been working together, side by side in the figurative and literal “trenches.” Whereas our physician colleagues are trained to be the lone wolves, or as I’ve heard it described, “the captain of the ship,” nurses are from the onset of training, trained to work as part of a team.

This Nurses’ Week, I set an intention to celebrate and honor all my Nurse Friends. To me, Nurses’ Week is a reminder about the joy we find in work – not just the experiences that arise from patient care – but also joy we find from the relationships we’ve built with one another along the way.

In 2018, I had the honor and privilege to interview Dr. Jane Georges, Dean of the Hahn School of Nursing at the University of San Diego and the author of the Emancipatory Theory of Compassion. During the course of our conversation, we got onto the topic of finding joy in work and Nurse Friends. Until Dr. Georges pointed it out, I hadn’t given much thought to the concept of Nurse Friends. My mom, a 30-year NICU RN, had Nurse Friends. Dr. Georges’ mother was also a nurse who had Nurse Friends. “NurseFriends” was simply a word we’d always known, because we both grown up with the knowledge that there are two kinds of friends: your friends, and your NurseFriends.

In discussing ways in which we can recapture joy in work and joy in nursing, Dr. Georges circled back to the concept of NurseFriends and the deep connection nurses share with one another; the connection that allows us to find so much meaning in what we do. “I call it the nurse-nurse bond,” Dr. Georges said, “It’s knowing that we can’t do it alone, which is one of the most beautiful parts of nursing.” In recalling some of the most healing environments in which she’d worked, Dr. Georges commented on the presence of joy, respect, and connection with other nurses.

“We just had this crew,” I mentioned as I reminisced about a group night-shift NurseFriends I worked with during my tenure working in an emergency department. Dr. Georges agreed, “I think the idea of the nurse-nurse bond, or NurseFriends, is worth exploring… how do we build back that community where we’re not adversarial to each other?” I think that the answer lies within ourselves and within the community of our discipline: building up our NurseFriends to strengthen one another, to strengthen the profession, to strengthen ourselves, and ultimately, to strengthen the care we give our patients.

Two years ago, I had to tell a NurseFriend who’d become my primary care patient that I’d found lymphoma on her MRI. That was one of the worst days of my professional career. I remember sitting in my office, sick to my stomach. Delivering bad news to a patient is never easy; delivering bad news to a NurseFriend will break your heart.

This NurseFriend is doing great. Her cancer is in remission. She’s healthy. She’s now the clinical manager of my primary care office. I’m lucky: we caught her cancer early, got her great treatment, and I get to see her smiling face every day.

To all of my NurseFriends, thank you for sharing your light with me. You are my heros not just during Nurses’ Week, but every week!

Honoring our Heritage, Building our Future

Today we are adopting a new nursology.net tag line “Honoring our Heritage, Building our Future” in concert with the annual focus in May of each year on nursing and nurses, anchored around  Florence Nightingale’s birth date – May 12, 1820. Almost 100 years later, nursology theorist Martha E. Rogers was born on the same date in 1914.  These two giants of nursology history, and many others, have built the foundation from which we move forward in the quest to understand human health experiences.  We have asked members of our nursology.net management team to share particular “heritages” that stand out for them as significant. Here are our responses:  

Leslie H. Nicoll – The Nursing Editors History Project

Leslie Nicoll

A few years ago, Peggy Chinn and I had an “Aha!” moment when we realized there was no archive or complete listing of the women and men who have served as editors of scholarly nursing journals. We believe this is a serious omission and sought to create such a resource and thus, the Nursing Editors History Project (NEHP) was born. The NEHP is a venture between the Dolan Collection at the School of Nursing at the University of Connecticut; along with Peggy and me, Carol Polfroni is providing leadership to the project. You can visit the site at nehp.uconn.edu.

If we consider Florence Nightingale to be the founder of nursology, then our profession is relatively young, spanning less than 200 years. There has always been a focus on education and scholarship in nursology; the first disciplinary journals were published starting in the 1880s. In the US, the American Journal of Nursing published its inaugural issue in 1900. It has been published continuously ever since. Other journals with long and distinguished histories include Sygeplejersken (“The Nurse,” in Danish, since 1901); the Canadian Nurse (Canada, 1905); Nursing Times (United Kingdom, 1905); Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand (1908); and the Philippine Journal of Nursing (1926).

Editors of professional journals play an important role as gatekeepers of practice innovations, research findings, and other information that is disseminated through the published literature. The impact of the editor is profound and influential. Given that, you might think that an easy-to-use listing of editors would have been maintained over the years–but it has not. In the absence of such a list, you might think you could go to the online home of a journal and search through the digitized collection to find editor information. Go ahead and try to do that. You will find, as we did, that journal archives include that published articles but they do not include the “front matter,” that is, the pages that list the editor, associated editorial staff, editorial board members, and information about the publisher. Thus, the archive for a journal represents just one dimension of the publication. What is missing is the knowledge of the people who were in charge, in particular, the editor–whose voice was important, influential, and must be heard.

The NEHP has been growing slowly. At present, it includes 34 journals with publishing histories ranging from 100+ years to 9. We have learned that tracking down editor information–especially for some of the older journals–takes time and effort. Finding pictures is even harder! This realization has impressed upon us the importance of the NEHP and the need to capture this information before it disappears completely. Our goal is to be comprehensive, both at the individual journal level as well as in the breadth of nursology journals that are included in the NEHP. We welcome submissions to the NEHP from editors, publishers, and librarians. When submitted information is comprehensive and accurate we are able to quickly list the journal in the database. You can read more about the process here: https://nehp.uconn.edu/submissions/

Florence Nightingale was a meticulous data collector, prodigious correspondent, and author of books and articles. As far as I can determine, she was never a journal editor, but I am sure she held the editors those journals published in her life in high esteem–as we should. The NEHP truly “honors our heritage” by capturing essential information about the leaders of scholarly publication in nursology.

Adeline Falk-Rafael – Returning to our Roots

Adeline Falk-Rafael

It is only fitting that we honor nursing’s past each year around the time of Florence Nightingale’s birthday.   She was a remarkable woman and visionary. In many ways, she reflected the thinking of her day, i.e., that social, economic, and political factors greatly influenced (often adversely in vulnerable populations) the potential to be healthy. She believed that compassion, therefore, must include social and political activism focused on changing laws and the conditions that adversely affected health for many and  led by example (Falk Rafael 1999). Many examples have been documented and extend beyond policies in the UK to international efforts (Falk-Rafael 2005).  Nightingale’s focus on promoting the health of populations was evident in the first nursing program she established, in which one entire year was dedicated to health nursing of communities.

Her model of health nursing, including social and political advocacy influenced early nursing leaders elsewhere in the world, as well.  I know first hand of her influence in Canada, e.g, in the work of the Victorian Order of Nurses, and the U.S., in the work of Lillian Wald who added the word public to health nursing. She and other nurses of the Henry Street Settlement (more information here)  followed Nightingale’s example in advocating for social and political reform to create conditions that were more conducive to health (Falk-Rafael 2005) .  I hope nurses from other parts of the world will add  further examples of Nightingales influence on nursing elsewhere.

Finally, honoring our heritage  must, I believe include those women who provided nursing and health care before or during Nightingales time. Mary Seacole, was a Jamaican nurse who also cared for soldiers in the Crimean War. In Canada, centuries before Nightingale, women in religious orders and pioneer women, such as Jeanne Mance in the 17th and 18th century provided nursing care to communities. They also understood the necessity of advocating for laws and societal reforms to move toward social justice and health equity.  And, I think of the nurses who fought for womens rights and the abolition of slavery like Sojourner Truth  and Harriet Tubman. Many others are also profiled on the Nurse Manifest Gallery of Activism Inspirations.

Our heritage is nursing practiced from a nursing paradigm before the rise of a dominant biomedical model that can shape and limit our conceptualizations of health and its promotion. We can learn from the examples of those who have gone before. I believe that Nursology, by making visible the nursing science which informs nursing practice can help nurses reclaim their authentic nursing identity.

Jacqueline Fawcett – Florence Nightingale’s Contributions to Martha E. Rogers’ Thinking and Development of the Science of Unitary Human Beings

Jacqueline Fawcett

Martha E. Rogers (1992) contributed a marvelous essay to the Commenorative edition of Florence Nightingale’s classic book, Notes on nursing: What it is and what it is not. She began her essay with these words:

Florence Nightingale’s Notes on Nursing is an exciting and far-reaching compendium of ideas and statements concerning the purposes and scope of nursing, the essentials of good nursing practice, and the variety of providers of nursing that existed in her purview. With consummate skill and cogent humor, she decries the fallacies of health practices and the superstitions that existed among the public and in particular health workers. (p. 58)   

Rogers went on to point out that much of what Nightingale wrote is as relevant today as it was in the middle 1800s. She noted that Nightingale’s vision of the need for “human compassion, a broad knowledge base, intelligent reasoning, and understanding” (p. 58) were particularly relevant in the 1990s, and I will add, are even more relevant—indeed crucial—in the 21st century.    

Furthermore, Rogers (1978, 1992) traced her own dual concern with human beings and their environments to Nightingale. She explained, “Rogerian science of irreducible human beings provides a framework rooted in a new reality and directed toward moving us from what might be called a pre-scientific era to a scientific era. Certainly Nightingale laid a firm foundation for this kind of an approach to nursing knowledge and its use” (Rogers, 1992, p. 61).

oward the end of her essay, Rogers (1992) further emphasized the importance of Nightingale’s work for all of us today. She wrote that Nightingale’s ideas not only are meaningful today but also provide a firm foundation as nurses move forward in the development of nursing as a science in its own right, and make way for knowledgable directions that enable nurses to practice based on their own phenomena of concern. It is the uniqueness of nursing that makes it important, not the ways in which it is like other fields.

Rogers (1992) concluded that section of her essay by exhorting us to carefully consider Nightingale’s comment “that medicine and nursing should never be mixed up, since it spoils both” (p. 61).

I am certain that both Florence Nightingale and Martha E. Rogers would agree that the proper name for our discipline is nursology and that the members of the discipline are appropriately referred to as nursologists. I also am certain that both would applaud the development of nursology.net as a repository for all things theoretical in nursology!

References

Rogers, M. E. (1978, December). Nursing science: A science of unitary man. Paper presented at Second Annual Nurse Educator Conference, New York. [Audiotape.]

Rogers, M. E. (1992). Nightingale’s notes on nursing: Prelude to the 21st century. In F.N. Nightingale, Notes on nursing: What it is, and what it is not (Commemorative edition, pp. 58–62). Philadelphia: Lippincott.

Marlaine Smith – Standing on the Shoulders of the Giants of Nursology

Marlaine Smith

As we approach the birthdays of Florence Nightingale and Martha Rogers on May 12th I’m reminded that we are standing on the shoulders of the giants of nursology.  What is my responsibility as I stand on these shoulders? First, is to acknowledge and cite the work of the giants who have come before us. At times I hear newer ones to our discipline speak of a great new idea or concept that I know was actually something that was advanced by previous scholars and is in the literature.  This certainly is not the fault of the newer members coming into our professional discipline. It is our responsibility of faculty and mentors to expose students of nursology to the wisdom of our heritage. As Peggy Chinn admonished us in her blog, let’s  get rid of the instructions to students that they should only review the past five years of the literature.  Our students need to be introduced in the most engaging way to the seminal writings of our foremothers and forefathers.  Would any undergraduate psychology student not be introduced to  Freud, Piaget, Erikson? Absolutely not! Our challenge is to create opportunities for the past work of our scholarly giants to come from the shadows into the light.  In my BSN program I was briefly introduced to Florence Nightingale…just by name…Do you know what I remember? …only that I heard that Florence Nightingale died of syphilis.  While this is not true, that myth was propagated widely and it diminished us. When I began my Masters program I had to read Notes on Nursing as part of my theory course.  I was filled with amazement and pride that this courageous, brilliant woman discovered the human-health-environment-caring connections that ground nursology today.  Let’s give this gift to our students by studying the giants of the past. By standing on the shoulders of the giants of nursology we can reach lofty heights. The most beautiful buildings need strong foundations.  They cannot exist without them. In order to build our professional discipline to new heights we must build on our disciplinary, theoretical foundations. In this way, we are truly building NURSOLOGY. This doesn’t mean staying within the limits of the past.  We are free to innovate, create, change, renovate, regenerate as we reach for the possibilities of what nursology can bring to the world.