Visions for 2020 – the Year of the Nurse

To all Nursology.net visitors – welcome to the Year 2020!  As we enter this year, we members of the site management and blogging teams join in celebrating the “Year of the Nurse and Midwife” and offer our visions for the coming year and beyond!

The year 2020 was designated In January 2019 by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the “Year of the Nurse and Midwife”  in honor of the 200th birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale.  Far from being a mere sentimental expression recognizing the importance of nursing and midwifery worldwide, this designation is part of a worldwide effort to improve health globally by raising the status of nursing and midwifery.  Here is the statement issued in establishing this designation:

The year 2020 is significant for WHO in the context of nursing and midwifery strengthening for Universal Health Coverage. WHO is leading the development of the first-ever State of the World’s Nursing report which will be launched in 2020, prior to the 73rd World Health Assembly. The report will describe the nursing workforce in WHO Member States, providing an assessment of “fitness for purpose” relative to GPW13 targets. WHO is also a partner on The State of the World’s Midwifery 2020 report, which will also be launched around the same time. The NursingNow! Campaign, a three-year effort (2018-2020) to improve health globally by raising the status of nursing will culminate in 2020 by supporting country-level dissemination and policy dialogue around the State of the World’s Nursing report.

Nurses and midwives are essential to the achievement for universal heath coverage. The campaign and the two technical reports are particularly important given that nurses and midwives constitute more than 50% of the health workforce in many countries, and also more than 50% of the shortfall in the global health workforce to 2030. Strengthening nursing will have the additional benefits of promoting gender equity (SDG5), contributing to economic development (SDG8) and supporting other Sustainable Development Goals. (from https://www.who.int/hrh/news/2019/2020year-of-nurses/en/)

As members of the Nursology.net management team, we are welcoming the 2020 “Year of the Nurse and Midwife” with our visions for this coming year and beyond.  We hope our ideas will inspire you to join in making these values and visions a reality!

Maggie Dexheimer Pharris –

2020 vision. During an eye exam, there is a moment when just the right corrective lens falls into place and suddenly we appreciate 20/20 clarity of vision. Remarkable!  So too it is with theory. In this new decade may nurses around the world find just the right nursology theory to clearly see the path to creating a meaningful practice and equitable, accessible, and healing systems of care!

Karen Foli – 

Unity among nurses based on the care we offer and the universal experiences we share. kindness directed toward patients and fellow nurses, even when they may be unable to reciprocate in that moment. Wisdom to understand how nursing power can be harnessed to forward a sustainable, balanced work life and advocate for improvements in patient and family care. And for nurses’ truth to be spoken freely, a reality to be heard and honored.

Peggy Chinn – 

A renewal of deep respect and tireless dedication for the core values of our discipline – protection of the dignity of each individual, advocacy for the needs of those we serve, and belief in the healing potential of our caring relationships.

Marlaine Smith – 

An accelerating appreciation for the distinctive knowledge of the discipline and the unique contribution that this knowledge can make to the health, well-becoming and quality of life of those we serve. With this appreciation will come the growth of research that is focused on the theories of nursology and practice models that are theory-guided.  Our focus on human wholeness, health as well-being/becoming, the human-environment-health interrelationship and caring is what is missing and most needed in healthcare.

Jane K. Dickinson  –

My vision is that all nurses will know, value, and be guided by nursing knowledge and take caring to the next level in education, practice, and research.

Jessica Dillard-Wright – 

Because 2020 has been declared the Year of the Nurse by the World Health Organisation, my vision for the year is that nursing will embrace the emancipatory potential of our discipline, recognizing the interface between nursing knowledge, nursing praxis, and wellbeing on a global scale. In so doing, we can dismantle injustice and mobilize our profession to nurse the world.

Jacqueline Fawcett

 Now is the perfect time to accept NURSOLOGY as the proper name for our discipline and profession. Now is the perfect time to realize that all individuals licensed as Registered Nurses or equivalent designation worldwide are NURSOLOGISTS. Now is the perfect time for all nursologists to realize they are “knowledge workers” who engage in development, application, and dissemination of nursology discipline-specific knowledge so that we know and everyone else knows the what, why, how, where, and when of our work with those individuals and groups who  seek our services.

Chloe Littzen – 

My vision for nursing in 2020 is that we find unity among our diversity, despite settings, education levels, or beliefs, and work collaboratively to advance the discipline, enabling all nurses epistemic authority and well-being.

Rosemary Eustace – 

The year 2020 is a great reminder of the “200” unique contributions nurses and midwives make each day to improve health, health care, health policy and nursing across diverse settings.  As we celebrate this milestone, let us light our lamps in unity to advance nursing knowledge that is congruent with contemporary health care demands. Let us keep the Power of Nursology alive!

Marian Turkel – 

Vision for 2020: Nursing theory will guide nursing education, nursing practice and nursing research. RN-BSN, BSN and MSN programs will have at least one nursing theory course in the curriculum.  DNP and PhD curriculum will have 2 nursing theory courses.  Nursing faculty and Registered Nurses in the practice setting doing research will use a nursing theory to guide their practice and research.  The Nursology leaders will collaborate with the American Academy of Nursing to organize a conference similar to the Wingspread Conference. The American Nurses Credentialing Center will collaborate with the Magnet Recognition Program©® to require hospitals to have a nursing theory as the foundation for achieving Magnet©® Status Recognition.

 

Unity in Our Diversity: the KING Collaborative Conference and Nursology

         Last month, on November 14th and 15th, nurses from all over the world gathered to discuss nursing theory and the future of nursing at a landmark conference at George Washington University in Washington D.C. Hosted by the King International Nursing Group, the theme of the conference was “Nursing theories: Moving forward through collaboration, application and innovation.” Present at the conference included members of various scholarly groups in nursing such as the International Consortium of Parse Scholars, Leininger Culture Care, the Neuman Systems Model Trustees Group, Orem International Society, Roy Adaptation Association, Society for the Advancement of Modeling and Role Modeling, Society of Rogerian Scholars, the Transcultural Nursing Society, the University of Connecticut School of Nursing, the Watson Caring Science Institute, and the Nursing Theory Collective.

The above collage depicts different moments during the panel presentation at the King Collaborative Conference. On the bottom from left to right is Jacqueline Fawcett, Callista Roy, and Marlaine Smith.

         On the first day of the conference, a representative member of each of these scholarly groups presented on the nursing theory central to their organization. Each oriented their discussion toward the future of nursing as a discipline. Awareness of our habitual silos slowly emerged as each of these scholars presented, revealing our tendencies as nurse theorists – nursologists – to work in isolation. These voices were put into dialogue in a panel, convened to discuss the future of nursing theory and the discipline as we know it. From this discussion, panelists and attendees alike unanimously agreed that the future of the discipline required that we identify common ground and work collaboratively from our shared values grounded in nursing while recognizing and honoring our differences. The panel discussion concluded with a call to find unity in our diversity and recognize the strengths inherent in divergent perspectives. 

The Nursology Theory Collective at their first in-person meeting on November 15th, 2019.

      The next day, the Nursing Theory Collective had their first in-person meeting. In light of the pivotal discussion that had occurred on the previous day, representatives from different scholarly groups were in attendance to participate. One of the main agenda items for the first in-person meeting was revisiting the adoption of the term “nursology” in the group’s name, mission, vision, and values, in place of the term nursing. Achieving consensus through lively discussion on the politics and peculiarities of the term, the Collective ultimately determined that “nursology” was best suited for navigating the future of the discipline. As such, the Nursing Theory Collective has now been renamed the Nursology Theory Collective. It is our hope with this adoption that we can become more inclusive for all scholars and practitioners alike, breaking down walls towards a unified future for the discipline.

         Inspired by our shared space and time at the King Conference, looking towards the future, the Nursology Theory Collective intends to continue to advocate for the future of our discipline through practice, research, education, and policy. We hope to foster an inclusive home for nursologists from all perspectives. We ask you, as important voices in our discipline, what issues are most important to you? Though you may not attend our meetings, we value diversity, discourse, and dissensus. We want to hear from you about the future you envision for nursing. What are the theory, practice, education, policy issues you see as critical to our future? We want to hear from you, and we invite you to our next meeting on Monday, December 16th from 1:00 – 2:30 PM MST. If you wish to participate, please contact us via email at nursingtheorycollective@gmail.com

Please continue the conversation from the King Conference below in the comments, we look forward to hearing from you!

With gratitude,
The Nursology Theory Collective 

The Nursology Theory Collective at their first in-person meeting on November 15th, 2019.

Shaping the Future of Nursing Education and Practice: AACN Essentials Revision and the Next Generation NCLEX

In support of our mission “to advance the discipline of nursing/nursology through equitable and rigorous knowledge development using innovative nursing theory in all settings of practice, education, research and policy,” the Nursing Theory Collective (NTC) emailed the workgroup chairs of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials Task Forces on September 16th, 2019. In this email, we as the NTC advanced our support for a strong nursing perspective and theoretical orientation in the planned revisions to the Essentials documents that form the basis for nursing education at all levels of study. To date, we have received positive responses from the chairs of the baccalaureate, master’s, and DNP essentials revision workgroups. We understand that AACN has invited nursing faculty to have discussions regarding the Essentials, both at their universities and future conferences. We have provided our letter below to foster open dialogue regarding the importance of nursing theory in the future of nursing education. Please join these conversations as you are able and feel free to use the points we have developed as a starting point for your thoughts as well.

In addition to the effort regarding the Essentials revision, we also reached out to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) regarding the Next Generation NCLEX Project (NCSBN, 2019). As you are likely aware, the NCLEX is currently under revision with an eye toward ensuring novice nurses possess the necessary skills to detect the subtle changes in patient status, preventing deterioration, as well as avoiding errors. In pursuit of this project, the NCSBN has underscored the importance of clinical judgment and decision making in the safe practice of newly registered nurses. It is our concern that due to the absence of a framework founded in nursing knowledge and theory, the disciplinary perspective is lost such that clinical reasoning and clinical judgment devolve from a nursing skill to a generic biomedical task orientation (Bender, 2018). Moreover, the absence of nursing theory in the foundation of the Next Generation NCLEX project begs questions about our core values, how we value nursing knowledge, and to what regulation we agree to adhere (Perron & Rudge, 2015). Email communication with NCSBN about theory content and a guiding theoretical framework belied a lack of interest on their part in engaging in discussion of this issue, at least at this time. Given the role that the Essentials play in nursing education, the NTC has decided to focus on our efforts with the Essentials. We hope that, in time, with revision to the Essentials NCSBN will be motivated to consider the role of nursing theory in NCLEX and more readily engage. 

Appended below you will find our Essentials letter to the DNP workgroup, which is similar to the other two Essentials letters. Please share our letter among your colleagues to assist in the facilitation of discourse on this important topic.

Dear members of the DNP Essentials workgroup,

            We are writing to you today because of your role in the workgroup for the Revisions of American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) DNP Essentials. We represent the Nursing Theory Collective. Our collective membership, made up of experienced nurse clinicians, researchers, educators and scholars, as well as graduate students, emerged from the landmark nursing conference that was held at Case Western Reserve University called Nursing Theory: A 50 Year Perspective, Past and Future in March, 2019. 

As future educators and scholars, we represent the next generation of nurses who will implement the DNP Essentials in the process of educating nurses in the decades to come. We recognize that the DNP Essentials will have a substantive influence on the future of nursing education.

We appreciate your efforts as in the DNP Essentials workgroup and the challenges inherent in taking on the task of creating this powerful and empowering nursing document. We understand that this document, when finalized, will significantly influence the curriculum and the education of thousands of nurses in our country for many years.

It is the recognition of the lasting power and influence of the DNP Essentials recommendations that brings us to write to you today. We join with the American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Center and nursing leaders from institutions of nursing education across the country to respectfully ask that you consider the following points of concern:

1. Theory and Competencies
Nursing theory, representing the wide variety of theories, frameworks, and models used in nursing and including those that provide the historical foundations of nursing, are missing from competencies within the DNP Essentials recommendations. We request that nursing theory and nursing history be included in the Essentials at every level because it is anchors us to our past, present, and future knowledge of nursing. Nursing theory, including knowing the connections to its philosophical roots, shapes who we are as nurses and highlights the critical and distinct human service of nursing that is not met by other disciplines. Education in nursing theory, along with other essential educational content, ensures a solid foundation in disciplinary knowledge and perspective for future nurses, nurse scientists, and scholars. The ongoing development of nursing theory can also lead to the creation of knowledge that can be shared across disciplines. 

2.  Disciplinary Perspective
Competency-based education in nursing must reflect our unique disciplinary perspective with a focus on protecting, promoting and restoring health and well-being, the prevention of illness and injury, the alleviation of suffering (ANA, 2015, p.1) and perspectives on humanizing the health experience (Reed, 1997; Willis, Grace & Roy, 2008). The provision of nursing theory as a foundation for nursing education reinforces our discipline-specific perspective. Nurses need to be competent in articulating the history, voice, and vision of nursing. 

3. Nursing-Centered Frameworks 
Competencies derived from the biomedical models like the Interprofessional Domains of Practice (Englander, Cameron, Ballard, Dodge, Bull, & Aschenbrener, 2013) minimize 100 years of knowledge building that evolved within nursing to define the discipline specific contributions nursing brings to the patient care experience as a science and a discipline. This undermines the existence of the historical work that has been done in nursing theory development, and impedes the future progress of our discipline.

4. Nursing Identity
Interprofessional collaboration must be built upon a strong identity as nurses, so that each nurse can articulate what they bring to the healthcare team, highlighting the priorities that are different from but complementary to the interprofessional team. Without this perspective it will be all too easy for nurses to lose sight of their unique contributions to the interdisciplinary team.

5.  Healthcare Trends 
Healthcare trends and expectations will influence nursing’s roles and practice within healthcare delivery for the next decade, as AACN has articulated, making our strong nursing identity and unique perspective on patient care more important than ever. We are concerned that some current trends in healthcare may emphasize profit, technology and disease over the importance of nursing care, including an alarming shift away from the caring, holistic, scientific, and relationship-based nature of nursing and towards an often profit-driven, technical and biomedical model of interdisciplinary focus where nurses becoming identity-less “health care professionals.”

We envision harnessing the power of nursing through carefully constructed educational essentials to actively shape a just and equitable healthcare service model in the United States of America, and provide future nurses with a clear identity as nurses. However, our future nurses must be educated in the fundamental theoretical and philosophical foundations of nursing in order to preserve the character and ethos of our profession. 

In summary, nursing has always embraced interdisciplinary teamwork. However, we believe that our essential educational competencies must remain firmly grounded in nursing values, nursing theory, and nursing history. Educational essentials and nursing competencies must first reflect our nursing perspective, not those of other disciplines. 

We are nurses and our educational competencies should reflect nursing knowledge and nursing theory. We urge you to consider our recommendations, and how framing of the DNP Essentials within a biomedical, interdisciplinary model would minimize over 100 years of scholarly work by nurses to advance a unique disciplinary perspective and identity. We further recognize the impact that DNP-prepared nurses will have in the future of nursing and the future of healthcare, underscoring the urgency of our concerns.

We acknowledge and appreciate all of the hard work your committee has put forth on this important topic. We hope that you will consider our position in your future revisions of the DNP Essentials. If you wish to have further dialogue on this issue, we as future and present nurse leaders would appreciate the opportunity to engage further.

With gratitude,
The Nursing Theory Collective   

Cosigned by:
Brandon Brown, EdD Student, MSN, RN-BC, CNL 
Ellen Buckner PhD, RN, CNE, AE-C, FNAP
Clare Butt, RN, PhD 
Jill Byrne, MSN, RN, CNOR, PhD Student
Gayle L Casterline, PhD, RN, AHN-BC
Peggy L. Chinn, RN, PhD, DSc(Hon), FAAN
Da’Lynn Clayton, PhD, RN 
Catherine Cuchetti, RN, MSN
Jessica Dillard-Wright, PhD Candidate, MA, CNM, RN
Margaret Erickson, PhD, RN, CNS, APRN, APHN-BC
Rosemary W. Eustace, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC
Jacqueline Fawcett, RN; PhD; ScD (hon); FAAN, ANEF
Pamela Grace, RN, PhD, FAAN
Consuelo Grant, PhD Student, BSN, RN
Debra R. Hanna, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC
Jane Hopkins Walsh, PhD Candidate, PNP-BC, RN
Yuanyuan Jin, PhD Student, MSN, RN
Amy Kenefick Moore, PhD, RN, APRN, CNM, FNP-BC, APHN-BC, HWNC-BC
Kan Koffi, RN, AD, B.Sc., M.Sc.
Carrie Langley, PhD Student, MSN, MPH, RN 
Patricia Liehr, PhD, RN
Chloe Littzen, PhD Student, MSN, RN, AE-C
Colleen Maykut, RN, BScN, MN, DNP
Melissa McCoy, MSN, RN
Angela Norton, PhD Student, MSN/Ed, RN
Christina Nyirati, PhD, RN
Judith Pare, PhD, RN
Marilyn Ray, RN, PhD, CTN-A, FSfAA, FAAN, FESPCH (hon.), FNAP
Pamela Reed, PhD, RN, FAAN
M. Kay Sandor, PhD, RN, LPC, AHN-BC
Phyllis Shanley Hansell, DdD
Mike Taylor RN, MHA, CDE
Billie S. Vance, MSN, FNP-BC
Sylvia K. Wood, DNP, ANP-BC, AOCNP
Rorry Zahourek, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC (ret), AHN-BC, FAAN

References

American Nurses Association. (2015). Nursing scope and standards of practice (3rd ed.). Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Bender, M. (2018). Re-conceptualizing the nursing metaparadigm: Articulating the philosophical ontology of the nursing discipline that orients inquiry and practice. Nursing Inquiry, 25(3), 1-9. doi: 10.1111/nin.12243

Englander, R., Cameron, T., Ballard, A. J., Dodge, J., Bull, J., & Aschenbrener, C. A. (2013). Toward a common taxonomy of competency domains for the health professions and competencies for physicians. Academic Medicine, 88(8), 1088-1094. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31829a3b2b

NCSBN. (2019). Next generation NCLEX project. Retrieved from https://www.ncsbn.org/next-generation-nclex.htm 

Perron, A., & Rudge, T. (2015). On the Politics of Ignorance in Nursing and Health Care: Knowing Ignorance. New York, NY: Routledge.

Reed, P. G. (1997). Nursing: The ontology of the discipline. Nursing Science Quarterly, 10(2), 76-79. doi: 10.1177/089431849701000207

Willis, D. G., Grace, P. J., & Roy, C. (2008). A central unifying focus for the discipline: facilitating humanization, meaning, choice, quality of life, and healing in living and dying. Advances in Nursing Science, 31(1), E28-E40. doi: 10.1097/01.ANS.0000311534.04059.d9.

An Update from the Nursing Theory Collective

Welcome to Chloe Olivia Rose Littzen, who has now joined our
Nursology.net blogging team!
Chloe is a founding member of the
Nursing Theory Collective and
currently a PhD Student at the University of Arizona (Tuscon)

I. Introduction

In June of this year, a blog post was shared on Nursology.net by the Nursing Theory Collective, a group of scholars and students with a mission to advance the discipline of nursing/nursology through equitable and rigorous knowledge development using innovative nursing theory in all settings of practice, education, research, and policy. (Visit that post here). We are using the term nursing/nursology as at this moment in time as we continue to have discourse on the exact word choice we will use to characterize ourselves as a collective. 

To review, the Nursing Theory Collective was formed after the landmark conference, “Nursing Theory: A 50 Year Perspective Past and Future”, on March 21-22, 2019 at Case Western Reserve University. Since May, the group has met monthly to further discuss pivotal issues related to nursing theory and the identity of nursing/nursology, define their mission and vision statement, and to establish action items to drive their vision forward. Currently, the Nursing Theory Collective has 45 members from around the world including Canada, China, Colombia, and the United States, promoting a global perspective of nursing and nursing theory. 

To promote global connectivity, the Nursing Theory Collective created a WhatsApp (https://www.whatsapp.com) group for an easily accessible format that members in other countries can easily connect via their smartphones. In this WhatsApp group, members discuss pertinent issues related to nursing theory and the identity of nursing, sharing articles, actions in progress, or reminders for actions that evolved from previous meetings. Our meetings have been hosted via Zoom Video Conferencing (https://zoom.us) which enables access to participate in most countries, and has allowed us to record all meetings for future reference. A shared Google Drive was also created, enabling all members to have access previous document, to assist in the development of future action items, and to collaborate in real time. 

II. Updates 

To date, the meetings for our collective have revolved around discussions on actions items that can be taken to move the discipline of nursing and nursing theory into the future. In order to accomplish our collective goals, we have been working to define our mission, vision and values, and establishing logical action plans in the forms of scholarly writing and policy letters. In the following paragraphs, you will find a brief synopsis of all the action items that are in progress or completed. 

Mission, Vision, and Values. We have been working diligently on defining our mission, vision, and values as a collective. We recognize that this is a work in progress. We have been inspired by the vast body of prior nursing knowledge and theory work in the United States and abroad, as well as our individual philosophies of nursing. Guiding our mission, vision, and values is a concise definition of nursing theory first advanced by a working group of international nurse theorists, who proposed that nursing theory is simply “a description of what is going on” (Petrovskya, Purvis, & Bjornsdottir, 2019, p.2). Petrovskya, Purvis, and Bjornsdottir’s (2019), elegant definition, adopted from Rolland Munro, invites nurses to engage ideas beyond the theoretical paradigms most familiar to nurses educated in the United States. As this is an ongoing and open process, we invite you into the discussion and to add to our mission, vision, and values.

King Conference. In June 2019, the Nursing Theory Collective submitted an abstract that was accepted to the upcoming King Theory Conference in Washington, D.C. (King International Nursing Group, 2019). The topic of our abstract is, “Driving the Future of Nursing: A Collective Approach to Nursing Theory.” We look forward to being a part of this landmark conference. We plan to arrange a meeting of the Nursing Theory Collective at the King conference, and we welcome all members and non-members to join us for important discussions in driving nursing and nursing theory into the future. We will post details about the time and place for this get together as the date gets closer. One action item of this in-person meeting at the King Conference will be to continue the debate surrounding the adoption of the term nursology to characterize ourselves. 

III. Collaborative Efforts 

As we are a collective, we understand the importance of branching out and collaborating with individuals and groups to enable us to accomplish our mission and vision. To date, collaborative efforts have been placed into two categories: 1) Nursology, and 2) policy items related to nursing education and the future of nursing. Below is a brief synopsis of both of these efforts. 

Nursology. In 2015, Dr. Jacqueline Fawcett presented a case for changing the name of nursing to nursology (Fawcett et al., 2015). A variety of nursing scholars have echoed support for this change, but others have been questioning how this impacts on the discipline as we know it (Parse, 2019). To be mindful of all members views, we held an anonymous survey in June – July 2019 to adopt the term Nursology in our name, mission, vision and values. A total of eighteen votes were received, with 11 (61.1%) in support of adopting Nursology, and 7 (38.9%) in opposition. Members also had the option to write-in anonymously a rationale for their vote, and a variety of comments were received. For example, one member who was in support of the adoption asked “if there was an opposition for the collective to have an open discussion as to why this was.” Concerns that were raised by members in opposition included the marginalization of practicing and non-academic nurses, the validity and legitimacy of the term, and the belief that Nursology should be a term reserved for higher degrees in nursing such as the PhD. Supporters of the adoption argued that the term Nursology, while radical, would improve the strength of the identity of nursing, and has powerful implications for the general public and legislation.

Prior to the results being discussed, Dr. Fawcett kindly agreed to participate in our meeting where we discussed the adoption of the term Nursology, as well as the rationale for members in support or opposition. With this discussion, members had opportunities to further voice their opinion, and ask important questions related to the term and its meaning. For example, one member asked for whom the title nursologist should be reserved. Dr. Fawcett and other members designated the adoption of the term nursologist for all members, who have passed their licensing examination and are a registered nurse. At the end of the meeting, it was proposed as the group was undecided to adopt the term nursology into the mission, vision, and values, but also include nursing. We thank Dr. Fawcett for her involvement, and plan to keep the Nursology group updated as we move forward. Our next discussion on this topic will be in November at the King Conference in Washington, D.C.

Policy Items. In July, two members of the Nursing Theory Collective participated in a Zoom meeting with board members from the American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation (AHNCC, 2019). The purpose of this meeting was to begin a discussion and collaborate on a campaign to express the need for nursing theory to be a core part of the current educational essentials, as they are being revised by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). Action items from this meeting included the development of two letters focused on the educational essentials, as well as the revising of the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). To date, the letter to the AACN has been completed and is pending to be emailed out to key members of the essentials committee. After this, we plan to submit this letter for publication to spread the word of this important change that may impact the future of nursing. Our next step will be devising the letter the the NCSBN, we invite anyone who is interested in participating in developing this important letter. We thank the AHNCC for collaborating with us on this important project, and support them in their work as they promote a more holistic space for nurses to practice globally. 

IV. Future Efforts

While we have a significant to-do list as follow up from previous efforts, we continue to strive towards future actions in order to drive our vision for nursing and nursing theory into the future. We intend to remain vigilant about the AACN essentials, the NCSBN revision of the NCLEX, and will continue our activism aimed toward promotion of nursing theory at all levels of education. Our future actions include continuing our monthly meetings to have open discourse on the topic on nursing and nursing theory, we invite all members and non-members alike to participate. Additionally, we plan to write and submit manuscripts focused on demystifying nursing theory for practicing nurses and the educational environment. We welcome any and all ideas on how we can move forward with our goals, and hope that you would consider being a part of this movement. 

V. Conclusion and Invitation – Join us!

The next meeting for the Nursing Theory Collective is August 27th, at 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time. We encourage all nurses and students, regardless of setting, experience, or educational level, to join us by contacting clittzen@email.arizona.edu to participate. If you are interested in joining the WhatsApp group, please email us to let us know and we will add you promptly. We also have a twitter handle, @NursingTheoryCo, and you are welcome to follow us as we plan future social media events. We plan to continue to update the community here on Nursology.net to keep everyone informed, as well as promote a movement of inclusivity to drive nursing and nursing theory into the future.

With gratitude,
The Nursing Theory Collective

References

American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation. (2019). About AHNCC. Retrieved from https://www.ahncc.org/about-ahncc/

Fawcett, J., Aronowitz, T., AbuFannouneh, A., Al Usta, M., Fraley, H. E., Howlett, M. S. L., . . . Zhang, Y. (2015). Thoughts about the name of our discipline. Nursing Science Quarterly, 28(4), 330-333. doi: 10.1177/0894318415599224

King International Nursing Group. (2019). Events. Retrieved from https://kingnursing.org/content.aspx?page_id=4002&club_id=459369&item_id=976945

The Nursing Theory Collective. (2019, June 18). Moving Towards the Next Fifty Years Together [Blog post]. Retreived from https://nursology.net/2019/06/18/moving-towards-the-next-fifty-years-together/

Parse, R. R. (2019). Nursology: What’s in a name? Nursing Science Quarterly, 32(2). doi: 10.1177/0894318419831619

Petrovskaya, O., Purkis, M. E., & Bjornsdottir, K. (2019). Revisiting “Intelligent Nursing”: Olga Petrovskaya in conversation with Mary Ellen Purkis and Kristin Bjornsdottir. Nursing Philosophy, 20(3), e12259. doi: 10.1111/nup.12259.

A Theory of Parental Post-Adoption Depression: What’s New is New Again

Welcome to guest blogger Karen J. Foli, PhD, RN, FAAN,
Associate Professor,
Director, PhD in Nursing Program
Purdue University School of Nursing
Here she discusses the challenges of interacting with public media
about her theory of parental post-adoption depression (PAD)

Recently, I was contacted by journalists from Denmark and the New York Times. In both cases, they wanted to interview me about my middle range theory of parental terpost-adoption depression (PAD). I was honored to be asked about my work, but what struck me was a feeling of déjà vu. When my book, The Post-Adoption Blues: Overcoming the Unforeseen Challenges of Adoption (2004 and co-authored by John Thompson) was published and then followed by several empirically driven papers published in peer-reviewed journals (see references below), the press was out en masse.

It’s tricky talking to the press. I’ve made my share of mistakes and learned with every interview I’ve given. But back to the content of these interviews – parental post-adoption depression. The first questions I can count on are: “How does this compare with postpartum depression? What about hormonal changes? How common is PAD?” First, I try to explain that we now see postpartum depression as encompassing the perinatal time period. I describe how we really don’t know about hormonal changes with adoptive parents, but there are differences in the experiences of these two parent groups. In terms of prevalence, we’re not sure – my best estimate is 10% to 20% of adoptive parents may experience depressive symptoms.

Adoptive parents reach into society for a license to parent a child born to others. They go through a rigorous, invasive process during which they are waiting, and ultimately matched with an infant or child. Often, parents “sell” themselves as “super parents,” beings that set themselves up with high, often unrealistic expectations. Herein lies the heart of my theory: unmet expectations of themselves as parent, of their child, of family and friends, and of society and others, are associated with depressive symptoms. Based on my research, expectations of themselves are the hardest to meet.

The question becomes: how do nurses and nursology fit into this? Based on my research and writing (see also Nursing Care of Adopted and Kinship Families: A Clinical Guide for Advanced Practice Nurses), the answer is more than you would suppose. Social work is the historical and current default profession that we defer to when children are relinquished and for home studies that evaluate the fitness of adoptive parents. Yet we understand that adoptive children visit healthcare providers more frequently than birth children. Herein lies our opportunity as care providers to support families.

Many adoptive parents experience significant shame when they struggle with PAD. Sometimes, when they share their feelings, they will be met with: “But isn’t this what you’ve wanted?” Nurses in myriad specialty areas can make a positive impact. Pediatric nurses can assess the dynamics between the child and parent and look for cues of impaired or delayed bonding. Nurses providing care to older adults can also assess for PAD – relative placements in foster care and in informal arrangements are surging (also known as kinship caregivers). Primary care providers have multiple opportunities to look for signs of parental depressive symptoms post-adoption and ask about expectations that were or were not met.

To end, when parents experience depression, we know the kids suffer too. Nurses can be savvy caregivers to this special and vulnerable group of parents and their children. While this blog is too brief to relay all that we know about PAD, it’s a welcomed beginning.

References

Foli, K. J., Lim, E., & South, S. C. (2017). Longitudinal analyses of adoptive parents’ expectations and depressive symptoms. Research in Nursing and Health, 40(6), 564-574. doi: 10.1002/nur.21838

Foli, K. J., Hebdon, M., Lim, E., & South, S. C. (2017). Transitions of adoptive parents: A longitudinal mixed methods analysis. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing31(5), 483-492. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2017.06.007

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., Lim, E., & Jarnecke, A. (2016). Post-adoption depression: Parental classes of depressive symptoms across time. Journal of Affective Disorders200, 293-302. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.01.049

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., Lim, E., & Hebdon, M. (2016). Longitudinal course of risk for parental post-adoption depression using the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised.  Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 45(2), 210-226doi:10.1016/j.jogn.2015.12.011

Foli, K. J., Lim, E., South, S. C., & Sands, L. P. (2014). “Great expectations” of adoptive parents: Theory extension through structural equation modeling. Nursing Research, 63(1), 14-25. doi: 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000006

Foli, K.J., South, S.C., & Lim, E. (2014). Maternal postadoption depression: Theory refinement through qualitative content analysis. Journal of Research in Nursing, 19(4), 303-327. doi: 10.1177/1744987112452183

South, S. C., Foli, K. J., & Lim, E. (2013). Predictors of relationship satisfaction in adoptive mothers. The Journal of Social and Personal Relationships30(5), 545-563. doi: 10.1177/0265407512462681

Foli, K. J., Schweitzer, R., & Wells, C. (2013).  The personal and professional: Nurses’ lived experiences of adoption. The American Journal of
Maternal/Child Nursing, 38
(2), 79-86. doi: 10.1097/NMC.0b013e3182763446

Foli, K. J. South, S. C., Lim, E., & Hebdon, M. (2013). Depression in adoptive fathers: An exploratory mixed methods study. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 14(4), 411-422. doi: 10.1037/a0030482

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., Lim, E., & Hebdon, M. (2012). Maternal postadoption depression, unmet expectations, and personality traits. Journal of the American
Psychiatric Nurses Association
18(5), 267-277. doi: 10.1177/1078390312457993

Foli, K. J. (2012). Nursing care of the adoption triad. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 48(4), 208-217. doi: 10.1111/j.1744-6163.2012.00327.x

Foli, K. J., South, S. C., & Lim, E. (2012). Rates and predictors of depression in adoptive mothers: Moving toward theory. Advances in Nursing Science35(1),
51-63. doi:10.1097/ANS.0b013e318244553e

Foli, K. J., & Gibson, G. C. (2011).  Training ‘adoption smart’ professionals.  Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 18(5), 463-467. doi:  10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01715.x

Foli, K. J. & Gibson, G. C. (2011).  Sad adoptive dads:  Paternal depression in the post-adoption period,International Journal of Men’s Health10(2), 153-162. doi: 10.3149/jmh.1002.153

Foli, K.J. (2010). Depression in adoptive parents: A model of understanding through grounded theory. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 32, 379-400. doi: 10.1177/0193945909351299

Foli, K. J. (2009). Postadoption depression: What nurses should know. American Journal of Nursing, 109, 11. doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000357144.17002.d3

Interested In Contributing To Nursology.Net?: The Innovative Way Of Promoting Global Exchange Of Nursing Knowledge

Dr. Eustace is a member of the Nursology.net management team!

Nursology.net exists to provide a way for you, the reader, to get your research out to a broad, global audience!  We are increasingly challenged to find new ways of improving population health outcomes by ensuring quality nursing care for all (Fawcett, Amweg, Legor, Kim, & Maghrabi, 2018). As the largest segment of the health care workforce, the nursing profession is positioned to lead and advance health as well as transform health care systems (IOM, 2011).

With this charge in hand, contemporary nursing scholars need to be in the forefront of advancing the profession and promoting a better understanding of the contributions of nursing knowledge in health care through scholarly development of nursing science. Although there has always been hiccups or outright aversion of nursing theory development within the profession, this is about to change as more nurses are called to lead the way to deal with the 21st century health challenges that need an informed nursing workforce (All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health, 2016).

As a profession, I believe, we are transforming and our approaches are evolving.  Although our contributions might seem to be undervalued and in many cases our capacity to work to our full potential may be hindered, we are the only ones who can reverse this trajectory and advocate for the discipline, our patients, families and communities. We are the most trusted profession in health care systems. We have vast experience in theory construction methodologies and have significantly contributed to concepts related to nursing and health care.

Unfortunately, most of our preliminary work is not known to many nurses within the discipline and between disciplines. The impact of nursing on quality, access and cost of treatment is not new (All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health, 2016). We need to take such positive outcomes and strive to make sure our contributions to public health policy and decision making are shared widely through various venues including peer-reviewed publications, professional organizations and innovative websites. These venues are critical for information exchange as well as advancing nursing knowledge.

Nursology.net is an innovative website that provides a venue to promote global exchange of nursing knowledge in the 21st century. Through Nursology.net, nurses are encouraged to contribute by sharing their work on how they have constructed a nursing theory, how they have tested nursing theoretical underpinnings in the empirical world and the impact of their outcomes on nursing practice, education and/or health policy. This process of knowledge sharing provides a timely channel for “meta-theory”- the study of ourselves to – re-examine the strengths and weakness of our theorizing processes. This is highly needed in the discipline to clarify the domain of nursing, guide nursing research and practice (Jairath, Peden-McAlpine, Sullivan, Vessey & Henly, 2018; Lor, Backonja, & Lauver, 2017).

Although we are very limited in systematic reviews related to summarizing theoretical evidence or theoretical meta-analyses (e.g. Wolf., & France, 2017), and we are not well structured in disseminating our knowledge outside nursing circles, we can close the gaps by becoming CHAMPIONS for better ways of sharing and learning from good nursing practice and from our own research locally, nationally and at the global-level (All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health, 2016).  So, where can you start? The answer is Nursology.net.  

And why should you care about disseminating your findings on Nursology.net?

You should care because the construction of nursing knowledge can only continue to evolve as long as we share how we utilize and/or refine what we know about the theoretical underpinnings related to the art and science of nursing and how we contribute to the profession, the healthcare environment, targeted population and ultimately population health outcomes over time. Nurse scholars or student nurses should strive to share their findings on how they make deductive and inductive conclusive augments on their phenomena of interest by sharing their work as Practice, Education/theory, Research/Theory, Policy/Theory or Quality Improvement/Theory exemplars. (Note: there are forms on each of the main “Exemplar” sections that you can use to share your work!)

Are you interested in contributing your research work to Nursology.net? If YES, please follow the attached quick guide to get started! Become a CHAMPION FOR ADVANCING NURSING KNOWLEDGE!!  (Download a PDF of the flow chart here)

References

All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health. (2016). Triple Impact: How Developing Nursing Will Improve Health, Promote Gender Equality and Support Economic Growth. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/hrh/com-heeg/digital-APPG_triple-impact.pdf

Fawcett, J., Amweg, L. N., Legor, K., Kim, B. R., & Maghrabi, S. (2018). More Thoughts About Conceptual Models and Literature Reviews: Focus on Population Health. Nursing science quarterly, 31(4), 384-389.

Institute of Medicine (US) (2011). Committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing. (2011). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Jairath, N. N., Peden-McAlpine, C. J., Sullivan, M. C., Vessey, J. A., & Henly, S. J. (2018). Theory and Theorizing in Nursing Science: Commentary from the Nursing Research Special Issue Editorial Team. Nursing research, 67(2), 188-195.

Lor, M., Backonja, U., & Lauver, D. R. (2017). How Could Nurse Researchers Apply Theory to Generate Knowledge More Efficiently?. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 49(5), 580-589.

Wolf, Z. R., & France, N. E. (2017). Caring in Nursing Theory. International Journal for Human Caring, 21(2), 95-108.