TOUS as a TOOL: Bedside RNs Using Theory to Improve QOL for Post-Prostatectomy Patients & their Partners

Contributors: Meredith A. Ford, MSN, RN, CNEJ. Michael Leger, Ph.D., MBA, RN, CNL, NEA-BC, CNE The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (TOUS) focuses on understanding how patients respond to multiple symptoms of a disease process, the commonalities among these symptoms, and how interventions might be used to alleviate more than one symptom. In this interactive model, … Continue reading TOUS as a TOOL: Bedside RNs Using Theory to Improve QOL for Post-Prostatectomy Patients & their Partners

Patient Safety Research: Magnifying Silent Voices

Contributor: Seth Stephens Patient safety has always been an important part of nursing. Over the course of my twenty years as a nurse I have had the opportunity to see nurses escalate broken care processes and issues that have saved patient lives, and I’ve seen how systems errors can result in patient deaths. Several years … Continue reading Patient Safety Research: Magnifying Silent Voices

Gender Inclusivity Lessons as a Novice Researcher: Reflecting on Emancipatory Knowing

Contributor: Kelsie Barta, MSN, APRN, FNP-C, IBCLC As a people pleaser at heart, I would not have believed you if you told me five years ago that a social media post sharing my dissertation recruitment information would be met with “laugh” and “angry” reactions, and that I’d be fine with it! In recent years, there … Continue reading Gender Inclusivity Lessons as a Novice Researcher: Reflecting on Emancipatory Knowing

The Person with an Initial Clinical Diagnosis of “HIV”: Uncertainty as a Human Response

Contributor: Bárbara Marisa Franco Nunes da Silva Cardoso I have been a nurse for over a decade, always in the infectious diseases department, working with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As I see in my clinical practice and as several authors substantiate, this infection has an impact on the person in all its … Continue reading The Person with an Initial Clinical Diagnosis of “HIV”: Uncertainty as a Human Response

Power, racism, and the imperative of advocacy in the nursing profession: A call to action from the Tennessee Three

Contributor: Jean Croce Hemphill, PhD, FNP- BC The power of position, of conferred authority, and the power of societal and cultural privilege, converged this month in the state of Tennessee resulting in the silencing of diverse voices demanding action against gun violence. Given the moniker, the Tennessee Three, Justin Pearson, Gloria Johnson, and Justin Jones, … Continue reading Power, racism, and the imperative of advocacy in the nursing profession: A call to action from the Tennessee Three

Poetry as Knowing in Nursing

Contributor: Mary Ann Lavin, ScD, RN, ANP-BC (Retired), FNI, FAAN I selected the poem below by Juliette Ligon from the Internet (retrieved December 11, 2022 from the Poetry Soup website) .It was written in 2019. I selected it because it so much mirrored by own experiences of unconsciousness. The first time was due to an … Continue reading Poetry as Knowing in Nursing

Report from the Newman Theory/Research/Practice Society in Japan

Contributors: Mari Mitsugi, Satoko Imaizumi, Mitoko Senzaki, Emiko Endo We are pleased to report on the work of the Newman Theory/Research/Practice Society in Japan. We have already posted three times on this NET (Jan. 10, 2019, by Endo & Mitsugi; Dec. 17, 2019, by Pharris; and Jan. 26, 2021, by Imaizumi, etc.). Here, the new … Continue reading Report from the Newman Theory/Research/Practice Society in Japan

The Best Nursing Job: Fulfilling My “Why” in Nursing Through the Nurse-Family Partnership Program

Contributor - Jessica K. Cochran, BSN RN At the age of 29, three weeks deep into the haze of being freshly postpartum, I found myself on the couch seemingly continuously nursing my new baby and glued to the coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. I was particularly riveted by the story of a young … Continue reading The Best Nursing Job: Fulfilling My “Why” in Nursing Through the Nurse-Family Partnership Program

Human-animal bond as a facilitator of comfort for the older person: Contributions from Katherine Kolcaba’s Theory

Contributor - Ana Pinto de Azevedo Nursing science has been defined in several ways based on theorists who consider the concept of relationship as fundamental to the perspective of human health. The human-animal bond is essential in health; life satisfaction is individualized and requires a holistic view. Nursing values relationships that are caring, natural, and … Continue reading Human-animal bond as a facilitator of comfort for the older person: Contributions from Katherine Kolcaba’s Theory