Happy Anniversary/Happy Birthday to Nursology.net!

We invite all of our visitors to join with us in developing this important resource!  Contact us with your interest and ideas!
This site is developed and managed solely by nursologist volunteers so our costs are minimal, but we welcome contributions to help assure the site’s future!!

Jacqueline Fawcett:

Jacqueline Fawcett

This is a very special blog, as we are celebrating the first anniversary/first birthday of the launch of nursology.net on September 18th. From a chronological developmental perspective, the website is transitioning from infancy to early childhood. However, given the amount of content already posted on this website, the weekly blogs, and the number of nursologists from many, many countries who have accessed the website, I dare to declare that we never were infants and now are mature adults! I am especially grateful to Peggy Chinn, our outstandingly superb webmaster, for her fabulous and steadfast work to create the website, the forms for submission of content and other items, many of the weekly blogs, and everything else that is needed to maintain the vibrancy of nursology.net. I also am very grateful to all members of our management team, whose interest in and enthusiasm for preserving our discipline has fostered so much success in one short year. In addition, I am very grateful to all other nursologists who have contributed content to the website, to those who have written blogs, and to those who have added comments to the blogs. I continue to welcome all nursologists to nursology.net—to view what is on the website, to contribute content, to submit blogs, and otherwise share your thoughts about nursology and all the wonderful work you are doing. The remainder of this blog is contributions from some of the members of our management team; I thank them for sharing their thoughts on the occasion of nursology.net’s first anniversary/birthday.

Peggy Chinn

Peggy Chinn:

When we first conceived of the website that we decided to call “nursology.net,” I certainly never imagined that the site would grow and develop as it has in just the first year! First, even though I have been immersed during my entire career in scholarship around the development of nursing knowledge, I honestly had no idea of the vastness, diversity, and widespread commitment that nurse scholars have demonstrated over the 50=plus years of nursing knowledge development. Those of us who have contributed to the development of the website knew one another professionally, and we all had deep respect for the scholarship that each of us brought to the table. But once we put all of our insights and expertise together in the tangible reality of the website, lo and behold, what we had was much larger than any of us imagined! During the past several months, I have had the opportunity to provide live “deep dives” into the website to demonstrate what is actually here – and with each occasion, everyone who participates leaves amazed at the true vastness of information that is here! As we look forward to the coming year, we will continue to add to the information in each section of the website, but our main focus will be to develop more thoroughly the “Exemplar” sections. After all, each of us involved in the site are nurses first – so our primary concern is using the theoretical ideas, our scholarship, to inform, shape, and re-shape our practices! We believe that nursing perspectives are necessary and valuable – that we offer dimensions that are respected by other disciplines. However, if we do not bring our perspectives as a central concern to each of our practices, something that is extremely valuable will be missing. Nursing perspectives do make a difference in practice, research, education, policy, and quality improvement – and each of the exemplar sections will continue to grow to demonstrate more clearly what that difference is!

Marlaine Smith:

Cheers to nursology.net on its one year anniversary! In only one year, nurses throughout the world have accessed nursology.net, offering us a valuable resource for learning more about the knowledge within the discipline. It is amazing to explore and discover the rich contributions, detailing the development and application of nursing theories of all levels in practice, education, and policy. Thank you to Drs. Peggy Chinn and Jacqueline Fawcett for their leadership in launching and advancing this website and thanks to all the contributors. Here’s to many more productive years of growing nursology!

Danny Willis:

When I pause to celebrate the one year anniversary/birthday of nursology.net, what comes up for me is a sense of hope for the future! Nursology is the substantive perspective that makes the difference in human and environment wellbecomng and alleviation of human suffering. Nursology addresses What Matters Most!” The philosophical, conceptual, theoretical, and empirical contributions that have shaped the discipline and profession are reflected at nursology.net. For nursologists everywhere, nursology.net provides a venue to be engaged in the knowledge endeavor, discerning clear direction should we get distracted. nursology.net is a wonderful resource for the world right here and right now, at our fingertips !! I look forward to continuing to participate in the evolution.

Dorothy Jones:

Nursology.net has become a global phenomenon, offering nurses from around the world immediate access to nursing knowledge and historical developments in nursing theory, education, research, and practice. When I presented the site to doctoral students in Spain, one student noted, “Having access to this site (for free) not only exposes us to information we do not have in our libraries but helps to connect us to our science in a new way. Thank you”. The continued development of nursology, with attention to presentations [in] other languages, will continue to grow the site and expand nurses’ ability to access knowledge and increase disciplinary dialogue around the world.

Dr. Eustace

Rosemary Eustace:

As we celebrate the one year anniversary of nursology.net,, we acknowledge the contributions of many of our founders and nursing scholars to evidence-based nursing (EBN). We call upon our fellow nurses around the world to advocate for the future of nursing that advances nursing science by developing, utilizing, and evaluating EBN to create a culture of health, promote social and financial justice, and increase access and responsiveness to evidence-based health care services.

Margaret Dexheimer Pharris:

Nursology.net has gotten off to a running start! In the past year, nursology.net leaders helped shape and participated in the 50th anniversary nursing theory conference at Case Western Reserve University (see Peggy Chinn’s conference keynote); several nursing journal editors have written about nursology.net in their journals; the American Academy of Nursing’s (AAN) Nursing Theory-Guided Practice Expert Panel has grown to be one of AAN’s largest expert panels; and, there have been over a dozen major nursology related conferences throughout the world. This resurgence of commitment to nursology practice and research rooted in the knowledge of the discipline provides a springboard propelling nursologists to ensure that nursing theory is woven through national nursing education guidelines for all professional levels, that every nurse can clearly articulate the difference that nursology makes because of its theories and philosophical perspectives, and that in the U.S., the National Institute for Nursing Research (NINR) be directed by a nursologist who understands the importance of grounding all NINR funded research in nursing theories and philosophies. These and many other efforts in which nursologists are engaging serve to holistically and equitably enhance the human experience of health. The year 2020 holds great promise for nursology to reach new heights!

Deborah Lindell:

Happy first anniversary to Nursology.net! This site serves a valuable service to all nurses by raising awareness of the essential role nursing knowledge plays in the discipline of nursing. It provides in-depth, understandable information about nursing knowledge in a variety of formats. I especially like the Guardians of the Discipline and the blog which promotes dialogue about current topics in nursing knowledge. I’ve integrated Nursology.net as a required resource in my DNP and MSN theory courses.

How to Teach Nursology: A New Resource on Nursology.net

The nursology.net management team is very pleased to announce a new resource for educators of nursology – Teaching/Learning Strategies. This resource is devoted to explanations of diverse approaches to teaching nursology. The first approach focuses on one way to teach the APPLICATION of nursology conceptual models and theories for practice. This teaching strategy involves teams of students role playing nursologists working within the context of various nursology conceptual models and theories that are applied to a fictional multi-generational, multi-cultural family. (See https://nursology.net/resources/teaching-the-application-of-conceptual-models-and-theories-of-nursology/) Comments about this teaching strategy are welcome.

I am confident that the creativity of all nursologists who each in academic and/or clinical settings will be evident as other approaches to teaching nursology are added to this section of nursology.net. Therefore, the management team invites all educators to use the content guidelines and forms found on the “Teaching/Learning Strategies” page to submit explanations of effective teaching strategies.

I would like to thank Deborah Lindell, a new member of our management team, for her exceptionally fine work developing the content guidelines.

A Critical Review of 5 Nursing Journal Editorials on the Topic of Nursology

A recent CINAHL search with the keyword “Nursology” revealed 5 editorials in leading nursing journals that focus on acquainting the journal’s readers with the website and the initiative.  Not surprisingly, 3 of those editors were founding members of the Nursology.net website. Each shared a different aspect of the project.

Jacqueline Fawcett is the facilitator of the Nursology website management team.  In her guest editorial in the Journal of Advanced Nursing,1 she briefly reviewed the history of the term and argued for its revival, citing a previous published work.2 “Use of the term, nursology for the discipline,” she and colleagues had noted in 2015,  “avoids the tautology of using the word, nursing, as the label for the discipline and as a concept of our metaparadigm.” In other words, it identifies and distinguishes what nurses know(nursology) from what nurses do(nursing) by using different words.  Fawcett also identified possible disadvantages of a change in terminology, such as causing confusion, or interfering with progress made towards the goal of increasing the number of baccalaureate prepared nurses, although she did not elaborate on how. Fawcett went on to describe the formation of the website and outlined some of its contents: nursological philosophies, theories, and conceptual models with exemplars of the use of nursing theories in practice, education, and research; a history of disciplinary knowledge development; identification of past landmark events and future nursology-focused events, and resources. She concluded by giving examples of the positive feedback about the website that has been received and inviting readers to champion nursology as a disciplinary name or to offer alternative ideas.

Peggy Chinn is the webmaster of Nursology.net.  Her editorial introduces an issue of Advances in Nursing Science3 for which a call had been issued for articles addressing the focus of the discipline.  She noted this was in part to acknowledge that approximately 50 years had passed since a series of conferences had been initiated to explore the nature, focus, and future of disciplinary knowledge. The issue also appeared a few weeks before a similar conference, held at Case Western Reserve to commemorate those 50 years, and within months of the founding of Nursology.net. Chinn emphasized the nurse-led, nurse-developed nature of the site and  described it as providing “the most current and accurate information about nursing discipline-specific knowledge that advances human betterment globally.” She listed the assumptions and principles that guide the project: that nursology is a distinct discipline, vital to human health; is multidimensional bringing together diverse philosophical and theoretic perspectives; is autonomous and makes a unique contribution to health care; and that although nursology interacts with other disciplines cooperatively and collaboratively, it remains distinct and autonomous because it reflects the distinct perspective arising from caring in the human health experience. Chinn concluded by noting that these assumptions both shape the focus of the discipline and suggest issues that deserve serious consideration and discussion “not to achieve consensus but to appreciate the range of possibilities and diversities that inform and shape our discipline.” Whereas Chinn’s editorial highlights the philosophical underpinnings and beliefs that support the neurology.net initiative, it does not elaborate in detail on what ANS readers might expect to find on the site. 

 Jane Flanagan is a member of the Nursology.net management team and editor of the International Journal of Nursing Knowledge. She noted in her editorial4 that  the Nursology.net website is in keeping with the vision of the American Academy of Nursing Theory Guided Practice Expert Panel and described the purpose of the website is “to further the goals of what all of us as nurses are hoping to achieve…to explore the boundaries of nursing science and move that conversation in to a sphere where it reaches many.”  Flanagan noted the initial intent of the website- to be attractive, easy to read, and “overflowing with substance.” She indicated her hope that it will be a significant source of information for all nurses and those interested in nursing and invited feedback and participation of readers in contributing materials, blogs, and comments. She briefly described various sections of the site to provide examples of the resources that might be helpful to readers. Flanagan concluded by highlighting some of the similar reasons that Fawcett gave in her editorial for identifying the name of the discipline as nursology and those who practice, teach, or research disciplinary knowledge as nursologists. She noted, “ the name itself separates us from the stereotype and the reality in some quarters that we are handmaidens to physicians.” Flanagan’s editorial was the first to be published of all 5 editorials, just a month after the launch of the nursology.net website.  While she could have, perhaps, given more details about site contents, she does direct readers to the website for further information.  Her  palpable excitement at being “on the ground floor” of this project will probably encourage them to do so! 

The 3 editorials from members of the nursology.net management team were, as might be expected, exceedingly positive about the site and the initiative.  Two editorials were written by nursing editors who were not part of the Nursology.net management team. While their perspectives vary considerably, they may offer the most substantive perspectives and may prompt further serious and extensive discussion of these issues.

Rosemarie Rizzo Parse’s editorial in Nursing Science Quarterly5 did not share the excitement and optimism evident in the above editorials.  Her understanding of the goal of the website is “to change the name of the discipline of nursing”. She commented favorably on the site’s “décor” but misleadingly reduced its content to a blog, “where contributors continue to add any material they wish without support evidence for the change.”  It is unfortunate that the readers of NSQ are not informed of the stated mission and purpose  of the website, which include developing a repository of nursing knowledge, disseminating that knowledge, and encouraging collaboration among nursing scholars. Currently the website profiles 45 nursing theories, ranging from conceptual frameworks to situation-specific theories, with the Theory of Humanbecoming among them. Parse posited that efforts would be better directed at “making nursing science the hallmark of the discipline” and then asked a number of important questions about what such a change would mean, including how nursing educational programs could base courses on nursing knowledge when there is pressure by accrediting agencies to include more medical-bio-behavioral content. It is not clear how she sees that conundrum being addressed by either term,  nursology or nursing science. Despite having acknowledged that the “proposed change is consistent with O’Toole’s statement  in Mosby’s Medical Dictionary,” the editorial concluded that the change in name ”lacks semantic consistency with disciplinary knowledge and upends logical coherence.”

Sally Thorne’s editorial in Nursing Inquiry,6 begins with her admission of having a long-standing discomfort with the term “Nursing Science”, first because it sounds like a qualifier to science, “as if nurses take part in a skewed, partial, or watered-down version of the scientific enterprise,” and secondly, because the term nursing science has largely been used to describe nursing theorizing, rather than “formal scientific investigation.” Thorne contextualized the introduction of the Nursology.net website as a response from nursing thought leaders arising from their shared awareness and concerns of external pressures that are increasingly shaping nursing and threatening the further advancement of the discipline, and provided readers of Nursing Inquiry with citations of articles exploring the implications of those pressures for the preservation of “core disciplinary knowledge.” Thorne noted the term, Nursology, has been used in nursing literature at least as early as 1971 and, although she confessed to some discomfort with using the term, preferring to use “the study of nursing”, she enthusiastically endorsed the direction  the conversations that have led to the Nursology.net initiative have taken. She concluded that she will be watching the Nursology.net conversation with great excitement, “hoping that it attracts the attention, engagement, and dialogue it deserves, and that it helps bring a new generation of nurses back into an appreciative understanding of why the study of nursing really matters.”

I think I can speak on behalf of the Nursology.net management team in saying, we share that hope! And, I would ask if “ology” refers to “the study of” and is widely used by many other disciplines, e.g, pharmacology, biology, why is there such a hesitancy (I’ve experienced it in talking to other nurses about neurology as well) to use nursology to refer to the unique body of knowledge that is nursing knowledge?  Is it simply prudent caution to make the change for the reasons a number of the editors raised? To what extent does it feel pretentious, i.e., have we internalized a broader societal message that our body of knowledge is not as substantial or valuable as those of other fields? Is this another manifestation of “I’m just a nurse?” And/or, is it simply that it’s new and unfamiliar?

  1. Fawcett J. Nursology revisted and revived. J Adv Nurs. 2019; 1(2):1-2.
  2. Fawcett J, Aronowitz T, AbuFannouneh A, et al. Thoughts about the Name of Our Discipline. Nurs Sci Q.2015;28(4):330-333.
  3. Chinn PL. Introducing Nursology.net. ANS Adv Nurs Sci.2019;42(Jan-Mar):1.
  4. Flanagan J. Nursology – a Site by nurses, for nurses. Int J Nurs Knowl.2018;29(4).
  5. Parse RR. Nursology: What’s in a Name? Nurs Sci Q.2019;32(2):93-94.
  6. Thorne S. The study of nursing. Nurs Inq.2019;26(1):1-2.

 

 

 

 

 

Who IS the First!

This blog is a follow up to the Who Will Be First? blog posted on May 21st. We now have an answer to that question!

St. Mary’s College Campus (from http://www.st-mary.ac.jp/about/)

I recently learned from Sr. Callista Roy  that a research center in her name included the word, nursology, in the center title. The title is: Roy Academia Nursology Research Center. This research center was founded in 2018 at St. Mary’s College School of Nursing in Kurume, Japan (http://www.st-mary.ac.jp/english/).

Professor Tsuyako Hidaka, of St. Mary’s College School of Nursing in Kurume, Japan, provided this description of the research center:

“The Roy Academia Nursology Research Center aims to explore Mercy, Caring, and Love through the avenues of both practice and education, which are executed across three departments: educational program development, postgraduate education, and continuing education.

1. The educational program development department facilitates education, practice, and research based on the Roy Adaptation Model, conducts activities for the Japan Chapter of the Roy Adaptation Association of Japan (RAA-J), and develops programs that enhance nursing skills for undergraduate and graduate students.

2. The postgraduate education department works with a wide range of students, from those planning to continue their research post-graduation, to those conducting activities as certified nurse specialists (CNS). Faculty members also assist students with research as well as offer counseling to undergraduates interested in pursuing a graduate degree.

3. The continuing education department is responsible for developing the curriculum for use in the wards at St. Mary’s Hospital, and continues to reform the currently-used clinical ladder education program to include elements for which nurses can continue earning education credits. The department also offers a continuing education program for nurses who work in community-based settings.”

The nursology.net management team members congratulate Professor Hidaka, her colleagues, and the St. Mary’s College administrators on being the very first entity to include nursology in the title of their research center. We look forward to learning of many other entities that will follow their lead and include nursology in the title of schools and colleges, departments, programs, and centers.

Callita Roy and Jacquiline Fawcett visiting St. Mary’s College (photo from http://www.st-mary.ac.jp/education/)

Nursologists and Their Comic Character Avatars


Once upon a time, I had a faculty colleague who had a wonderful sense of humor. She

could even inject humor into the statistics and research methods courses she taught. Unfortunately, I did not have anything close to her sense of humor. However, she assured me that it was very difficult to find humor in meta-theory, which is what I taught (and still teach), alas without any humor included.

Imagine my surprise when Peggy Chinn sent me an internet posting  by Jan Friesen and Skander Elleuche, who “developed a method that provides a simple, flexible framework to translate a complex scientific publication into a broadly accessible comic format” (italics in the original).

In an attempt to finally inject some humor into nursology, I started thinking of how comic characters could be transformed into nursologist avatars. I selected comic characters I knew from my childhood and, more recently, from the exhibits in Fawcett’s Art, Antiques, and Toy Museum, a small art gallery, shop, and toy museum that I co-own with my artist husband, John Fawcett. He is the creative one; I keep track of the finances.

My ideas for avatars for nursologists are:

  • Wonder nursologist (aka Wonder woman), whose special wrist cuffs

    deflect all negative concerns about theory

  • Super nursologist (aka Superman), who leaps over complex philosophical, conceptual,  theoretical, and methodological ideas with a single keystroke
  • Star nursologist (aka Star Trek), who goes where other nursologists are not yet ready to go
  • Fantastic nursologist (aka from

    Disney’s Fantasia movie) who converts theoretical knowledge to practice protocols.

  • Mighty nursologist (aka Mighty Mouse), who establishes nurse corporations that contract with clinical agencies to provide nursological qua nursological services to participants in practice (nurse corporations are Grayce Sills’ idea, nursing qua nursing is Jean Watson’s idea)
  • Terminator nursology (aka The Terminator), who eliminates all negative thoughts about conceptual models and theories
  • Spider nursologist (aka Spiderman), who climbs to the heights of nursology

    glory.

  • Yoda nursologist (aka Yoda from Star Wars), whose light saber illuminates all that is nursology.

I invite readers of this blog to contribute their ideas for comic character avatars for nursologists!

Nursing Philosophy Conference in August – and More!

We have added a new 2019 “Future Event” related to the development of nursing knowledge – the 13th Philosophy in the Nurse’s World & 23rd International Philosophy of Nursing Conference, to be held in Victoria, BC, Canada,  August 18-20, 2019.  In addition to the conference information, you will now find two important dates related to this conference in our “Due Dates” sidebar feature —

  • The abstract due date is February 28, 2019
  • Early bird registration ends on June 21, 2019

But that is not all! In addition to our regular blog posts at least every Tuesday, Nursology.net is constantly being updated with the addition of nursing theories, models, philosophies, landmark events, additions to recent past events, and exemplars. To help you keep up, we have added a sidebar “Recently Added” feature.  We hope you will visit Nursology.net often and check out the resources that are available related to past, present and future nursing knowledge development!

You can do it — contribute to the Nursology.net blog!

We hope everyone has noticed that Nursology.net has heaps of opportunities for people to  contribute – but did you know that you can contribute to our blog?  This blog is a multi-author blog (MAB), plus we welcome guest authors – which gives you an opportunity to become familiar with the process of blogging.  But wait a minute – I can already “hear” in my mind some of the push-back to this idea:  “I don’t have time to blog.” “Writing a blog does not contribute to the list of publications I need for promotion – I can’t waste time blogging.” “I need citations to my work and blog posts do not get cited.”  OK – I hear you!  But before you turn away from this idea, indulge me for a few moments and consider some good reasons you might begin in the world of blogging!

  • Blogs give you an opportunity to write in a different “voice” – a more relaxed tone that reaches people in ways that formal writing does not.  You can express your opinion, test out an idea to see if it “flies,” and ask your readers for specific feedback.
  • In fact, writing a blog post helps you develop the courage to use your voice — a challenge nurses often face.  My idea for this blog post was in part prompted by a post in an entirely different field – written by Marte C.W. Solheim from Norway, who tells a compelling story about finding the courage, as a PhD Student and then a recent graduate, to use her voice in the field of economics and political science.
  • Blog posts do not take away from the necessary work involved in your scholarship – instead the process of writing a blog post is like “thinking” time – it is an opportunity to reflect on points of particular importance to the ongoing development of your ideas.
  • Blog posts are being cited more and more often, and any social media mention of published work contributes to the “altmetric attention score” that is now displayed on published articles to indicate the amount and reach of the content in an author’s published works.  One of  the very important features that we are including throughout Nursology.net is the name of the contributor of content on any page (and on the blog), and the date the information was posted, in order that Nursology.net content can be accurately and adequately cited, with due credit to the appropriate author.
  • Your blog post provides readers an opportunity to give you feedback – much like a presentation at a conference – even if you do not invite it!  Feedback on your blog post is documented evidence of how your ideas are being received.  And sometimes they contribute to the development of your ideas.
  • Writing a blog post is not nearly as hard as you might think!  Blog posts are short, to the point and can include any kind of commentary or opinion that you want to include.  Of course if you draw on another source for some of your ideas (as I have done in this post) – there are no style manuals or formating requirements – as long as you find a way to point accurately to your sources, you are good to go!
  • Blog posts have the potential to reach an audience that you would never reach in a published article — nursology colleagues who might never see your published articles,  important scholars in other fields, and most important, the public whose interests your work is intended to serve. As Patrick Dunleavy pointed out on a recent LSE Impact blog, having invested hours and hours of time on your work, why not spend a couple of hours crafting an accessible blog post that has the potential to reach a broad audience?
  • Writing for blogs is rapidly becoming a new form of scholarly communication that draws on many of the ideals of the open-access model – blogs are also referred to as short-form digital publishing.  They are intended to broadcast your ideas as widely as possible.
  • You do not have to trudge through the long and arduous process of journal or book publishing, especially if you blog on your own blog!  Blogs are open to “public review” – a form of review that is not replacing the very valuable process of anonymous peer review, but is increasingly valued as a way to determine the worth of ideas in a public forum. If someone takes issue with your ideas, in all likelihood you will find out about it in short order.  This is a huge benefit — you cannot adequately address what you do not know is “out there” and blog readers are one of your best sources to explore the landscape of opinion related to your ideas.

The nursology.net  multi-authored blog (MAB)  team members are committed to writing regularly for the blog in order to have a new post at least weekly, and to provide a diversity of perspective, style, and content!  Some of our bloggers write their posts directly, using the handy “add a post” feature on wordpress.com (where our site is hosted). Others  send me the content for their blog either by email or using our handy blog submission form (also a sub-menu item under “Blog Home” on our main menu!). You can see who is on our team in the right sidebar, showing everyone’s name and a link to their most recent posts.

As the lead blogger,  I  make sure the links and other details are in order, and schedule each post 2 to 4 weeks in advance. If your post is time-sensitive, we will post it at whatever date is optimal. If I have any questions about something that is not clear, or if I detect something that needs to be double-checked for accuracy, either I, or someone else on our management team will be in touch to make sure your post is the best it can be. We might do a bit of light editing to correct spelling or obvious grammatical errors, but we do not aim for perfection!  What we do NOT do is revise or change your own message – we want your post to reflect your own ideas, your own voice.  We welcome controversial content, especially when you include sound rationales for your perspective and welcome open discussion.  The only thing we will intervene with is anything that is disrespectful or harmful, or “flaming” of other individuals or groups.

So this is our invitation to you!!  Use this opportunity to try your hand at blogging!  Let me know about your idea and we will assist you in every way possible to become a published short-form digital author (or if you prefer, a published blogger)!

 

 

The Experience of Nursology.net

Just before the holidays, my long-time friend, Sue Huether, said to me after spending some time on Nursology.net – “Peggy, this is not just a website – it’s an experience!” Her comment inspired our new site tagline because in fact, Nursology.net has indeed turned out to be an experience!

Even for those of us building the site, it has been an experience. We have all been involved in the work of developing and teaching nursing ideas for many decades, but the experience of the website has led us to new appreciation for the depth, the breadth and the significance of our discipline.

We invite you to experience Nursology.net often! Spend some time clicking around in every section, following links to information all over the web! Follow our blog, and visit the site often because we will have new content just about every week. Most important, we have built in ways for you to participate in every section! Not sure how to get involved, just let us know!

Interested In Contributing To Nursology.Net?: The Innovative Way Of Promoting Global Exchange Of Nursing Knowledge

Dr. Eustace is a member of the Nursology.net management team!

Nursology.net exists to provide a way for you, the reader, to get your research out to a broad, global audience!  We are increasingly challenged to find new ways of improving population health outcomes by ensuring quality nursing care for all (Fawcett, Amweg, Legor, Kim, & Maghrabi, 2018). As the largest segment of the health care workforce, the nursing profession is positioned to lead and advance health as well as transform health care systems (IOM, 2011).

With this charge in hand, contemporary nursing scholars need to be in the forefront of advancing the profession and promoting a better understanding of the contributions of nursing knowledge in health care through scholarly development of nursing science. Although there has always been hiccups or outright aversion of nursing theory development within the profession, this is about to change as more nurses are called to lead the way to deal with the 21st century health challenges that need an informed nursing workforce (All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health, 2016).

As a profession, I believe, we are transforming and our approaches are evolving.  Although our contributions might seem to be undervalued and in many cases our capacity to work to our full potential may be hindered, we are the only ones who can reverse this trajectory and advocate for the discipline, our patients, families and communities. We are the most trusted profession in health care systems. We have vast experience in theory construction methodologies and have significantly contributed to concepts related to nursing and health care.

Unfortunately, most of our preliminary work is not known to many nurses within the discipline and between disciplines. The impact of nursing on quality, access and cost of treatment is not new (All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health, 2016). We need to take such positive outcomes and strive to make sure our contributions to public health policy and decision making are shared widely through various venues including peer-reviewed publications, professional organizations and innovative websites. These venues are critical for information exchange as well as advancing nursing knowledge.

Nursology.net is an innovative website that provides a venue to promote global exchange of nursing knowledge in the 21st century. Through Nursology.net, nurses are encouraged to contribute by sharing their work on how they have constructed a nursing theory, how they have tested nursing theoretical underpinnings in the empirical world and the impact of their outcomes on nursing practice, education and/or health policy. This process of knowledge sharing provides a timely channel for “meta-theory”- the study of ourselves to – re-examine the strengths and weakness of our theorizing processes. This is highly needed in the discipline to clarify the domain of nursing, guide nursing research and practice (Jairath, Peden-McAlpine, Sullivan, Vessey & Henly, 2018; Lor, Backonja, & Lauver, 2017).

Although we are very limited in systematic reviews related to summarizing theoretical evidence or theoretical meta-analyses (e.g. Wolf., & France, 2017), and we are not well structured in disseminating our knowledge outside nursing circles, we can close the gaps by becoming CHAMPIONS for better ways of sharing and learning from good nursing practice and from our own research locally, nationally and at the global-level (All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health, 2016).  So, where can you start? The answer is Nursology.net.  

And why should you care about disseminating your findings on Nursology.net?

You should care because the construction of nursing knowledge can only continue to evolve as long as we share how we utilize and/or refine what we know about the theoretical underpinnings related to the art and science of nursing and how we contribute to the profession, the healthcare environment, targeted population and ultimately population health outcomes over time. Nurse scholars or student nurses should strive to share their findings on how they make deductive and inductive conclusive augments on their phenomena of interest by sharing their work as Practice, Education/theory, Research/Theory, Policy/Theory or Quality Improvement/Theory exemplars. (Note: there are forms on each of the main “Exemplar” sections that you can use to share your work!)

Are you interested in contributing your research work to Nursology.net? If YES, please follow the attached quick guide to get started! Become a CHAMPION FOR ADVANCING NURSING KNOWLEDGE!!  (Download a PDF of the flow chart here)

References

All‐Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health. (2016). Triple Impact: How Developing Nursing Will Improve Health, Promote Gender Equality and Support Economic Growth. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/hrh/com-heeg/digital-APPG_triple-impact.pdf

Fawcett, J., Amweg, L. N., Legor, K., Kim, B. R., & Maghrabi, S. (2018). More Thoughts About Conceptual Models and Literature Reviews: Focus on Population Health. Nursing science quarterly, 31(4), 384-389.

Institute of Medicine (US) (2011). Committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing. (2011). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Jairath, N. N., Peden-McAlpine, C. J., Sullivan, M. C., Vessey, J. A., & Henly, S. J. (2018). Theory and Theorizing in Nursing Science: Commentary from the Nursing Research Special Issue Editorial Team. Nursing research, 67(2), 188-195.

Lor, M., Backonja, U., & Lauver, D. R. (2017). How Could Nurse Researchers Apply Theory to Generate Knowledge More Efficiently?. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 49(5), 580-589.

Wolf, Z. R., & France, N. E. (2017). Caring in Nursing Theory. International Journal for Human Caring, 21(2), 95-108.

 

 

Values and Ethics: Foundations of Nursology.net

There are sections of many websites that are seldom visited – the mission, goals, or “About” pages that set forth the purposes that shape the content, focus and direction of the site.  Nursology.net is no exception, other than the fact that many first-time visitors may be intrigued by the name of this site and might explore the “About” menu item to learn more!

We have recently added to our “About” page a section we believe to be central to this project – our “Values and Ethics.”  These statements of value are not just words – they are the principles that guide every decision and that shape the content of this site.  Notice that central to what we value is your involvement!  Nursology.net belongs to every member of our discipline, and we welcome you to respond to any part of this site, including our statement of values and ethics!  Here is what we have posted – let us know your thoughts and ideas!

Values and Ethics

The development and maintenance of this site are guided by the following values:

  • We take every step possible to assure accuracy of content on this site by
    • Assuring review of content by members of the management team prior to activation of pages and posts.
    • Securing review and approval from any nurses who are central to the content presented (e.g. authors, key nurses involved), if those individuals are available.
    • Inviting corrections and updates from viewers who have the best information available.
    • Welcoming feedback, discussion and critique from viewers where there are issues of controversy or different points of view.
  • We assure accountability and transparency of the content on this site by:
    • Showing the name or names of the contributors who have provided the information displayed on specific pages
    • Providing the dates when content was initially posted and revised.
    • Providing links or references to sources from which content is derived, or is quoted.
  • We welcome submissions of content for each section of the website and have provided submission forms tailored to each section.  These forms are found on main pages of each section.  In addition, we welcome:
  • We will respond promptly to all communications, including requests to correct, change or remove any content that violates our commitment to  be accountable and transparent in using content from other sources.