A Tribute to Elizabeth Ann Manhart Barrett (July 11, 1934 – August 24, 2021)

Dr. Elizabeth Ann Manhart Barrett, nurse theorist and researcher, Rogerian scholar, and passionate advocate for nursing science, transitioned peacefully on August 24, 2021 surrounded by her family. She was best known for her theory of Power as Knowing Participation in Change derived from Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB) More than 100 studies have been conducted using the theory and/or measurement instrument (PKPCT); the PKPCT has been translated into 7 languages.

Elizabeth developed the first practice methodology for Rogerian nursing practice called Health Patterning, and she had an independent nursing theory-guided practice for many years in New York City based on this method. Elizabeth was a member of the American Academy of Nursing’s Nursing Theory-Guided Practice Expert Panel (NTGP-EP), serving as the organizer and first leader of NTGP-EP along with Dr. Rosemarie Parse. In addition, she was a founding member and first president of the Society of Rogerian Scholars. Elizabeth was a passionate champion of nursing science grounded in nursing theory. Her articles “What is Nursing Science?”(2002) and “Again, What is Nursing Science?”(2017) are classics. She edited four books including Rogers Science-based Nursing that received the ANA Book of the Year Award.

Elizabeth was born in Newburgh, Indiana and was blessed with five children, 14 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren. After 12 years of working in her home and caring for her children she decided to go to college. She credits her mother, a “feminist”, with inspiring her to pursue her dreams and to help people who were suffering, especially those who were less privileged. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing summa cum laude from the University of Evansville (UE) and continued as a part-time student at UE while working full-time and eventually earning a Master of Arts in education with a major in psychology and a Master of Science in Nursing. After this she taught psychiatric/mental health (PMH) nursing at UE and continue to work as a PMH nurse.

Elizabeth Barrett at the 2019 Case Western Nursing Theory conference

In 1976 she moved to Greenwich Village in New York City to begin doctoral study at New York University (NYU). It was a different world from her roots, and she loved New York City. It was there that she began working with Martha Rogers studying and advancing the SUHB. While in the PhD program at NYU she worked as a float charge nurse at Bellevue Hospital Center, fulfilling another dream; she considered Bellevue Psychiatry as the greatest challenge and reward in PMH nursing practice. It was her favorite position. While studying Nursing Science with a major in Theory Development and Research at NYU she taught research at Adelphi University and PMH clinical practicums at City University of New York (CUNY). After graduation she was an Assistant Director of Nursing at Mount Sinai Hospital for 5 years and then joined the faculty at Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing (CUNY) where she held positions of Director of the Graduate Program and Coordinator of the Center for Nursing Research. She retired as Professor Emerita in 2001 and expanded her private practice to full-time. She was a licensed therapist in the state of New York practicing Health Patterning, a nursing theory guided practice with private clients. For 40 years she was active in mentoring many researchers and scholars in the SUHB and Power Theory and conducting her own research testing and advancing the theory.

Those who knew Elizabeth can attest to her kind, loving and supportive nature and playful sense of humor. We will miss her on this Earth, but we will continue to experience her presence in many ways. May she soar in peace and power!

Society of Rogerian Scholars Conference Tribute

The SRS Fall 2021 conference planning committee met together this past week to plan a conference tribute to Dr. Elizabeth Ann Manhart Barrett. We invite you to join with us in organizing a Celebration of Light and Life that will be shared on Saturday October 2, 2021 in the afternoon as special part of the conference program. We are compiling photos and memories that will be organized and shared in a powerpoint presentation.

  1. We invite you to please send digital versions of any photos that you may have of  Dr. Barrett to msmit230@health.fau.edu and leslie@medesk.com. The photos may be scanned or you can take a photo of the photo and send in email. 
  2. We invite you to share any personal memories that you may have of Dr. Barrett or stories of how her work impacted your work or life. The SRS website has an open text box where the memories can be shared publicly or you can email msmit230@health.fau.edu and leslie@medesk.com with content to be shared in the conference tribute. 

We may also pull content form the website so if you write something there we may also include it. Depending on the volume of content we receive  we will have to make choices or edit the stories for use. 

There will also be time for open sharing of stories in real time at the conference during the celebration for those who would be comfortable doing so.

The SRS website link to write a memory  is here  and you can also follow the link to Dr. Barrett’s obituary shared by her family. 

Please feel free to reach out with any questions or concerns. 
As a reminder please register for the conference  here and share the conference information widely in your circles. 

SRS Annual Conference 2021

Join us for our 34th Annual Conference:
A Fantastic and Limitless Future: Nursing Science, Diversity, & Wellbecoming”

Keynote speaker: Marlaine C. Smith, RN; PhD; AHN-BC, HWNC-BC, FAAN

There is no charge to attend the conference but a donation to the Society is always appreciated!

Call for Abstracts for the 2022 Virtual Nursing Theory Week

Now open for submissions – until 11:45 pm EST on November 15, 2021!

The abstracts can be for either a 30-minute “Knowledge Session” or for a virtual poster presentation!

Visit the Nursing Theory Conference website for more details about submitting your abstract! Access to the abstract submission page is also posted in “Due Dates” to the right of each Nursology.net page!

Caring Science, Mindful Practice MOOC

Kathleen Simpson, Distinguished Watson Caring Science Scholar, offers a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) at no cost for people worldwide and from all disciplines to learn about caring science and how to apply caring science in their disciplinary service. Kathleen is a Professor of Nursing at East Carolina University.

The “Caring Science, Mindful Practice” Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is a 4-week long learning experience offered twice a year, with a session beginning in the first week in February and another session beginning the second or third week in September. The next session of this course will begin October 6th, 2021 and end November 3rd, 2021. It is free and open to anyone who has access to the Internet. It goes over 4 weeks and is roughly the equivalent of 0.5 academic credit.

For complete description and to sign up, visit the course website.

Sept 23 – Panel Discussion -Decolonizing Nursing: What? Why? How?

A webinar panel presentation sponsored by Nursology.net in association with the Center for Nursing Philosophy 

September 23, 2021, 6 – 7:30  PM Eastern (US & Canada)

ALL ARE INVITED!

Panelists

  • Lisa Bourque Bearskin, RN, PhD, Thompson Rivers University (BC)
  • Lucinda Canty, RN, PhD, University of St. Joseph (CT)
  • Barbara Hatcher, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, George Mason University
  • Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, PhD, RN, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Daniel Suárez-Baquero, PhD, MSN, BSN, University of California San Francisco
  • Bukola Salami, RN, MN, PhD, University of Alberta
  • Jennifer Woo, PhD, CNM, WHNP, FACNM, Texas Woman’s University

Moderator  – Miriam Bender, PhD, RN, University of California Irvine

Register in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

New on Nursology.net – Aesthetic Knowing

We are delighted to announce an important new section on Nursology.net – Aesthetic Knowing in Nursing.

Aesthetic knowing in nursing is a way of knowing realities that are not empirically observable – the deep meanings in a situation. As nurses grasp these meanings, they can draw on their inner, creative resources to respond to the situation in ways move the situation from what is, to what is possible. Aesthetic knowing is called forth in the face of human experiences that are common for to all human experience such as grief, joy, anxiety, fear, love. Even though these experiences are common, they are expressed in ways that are unique to each and every individual experience. People recognize common expressions of such experiences as anxiety, or fear, or love. But each person’s experience is unique.

From Introduction to Aesthetic Knowing

This section features the works of nurse scholar/artists whose art expresses a dimension of caring in the human health experience. Our inaugural scholar/artists are:

View the Scholar/Artist Gallery

If you are a nurse/artist and have works you are willing to share, we welcome your submissions for this section of Nursology.net! Use our “Aesthetic Knowing in Nursing Submission Form“!

Scholarly Publishing Shaping Anti-Racist Futures

The recent spotlight on police brutality and killing of Black Americans prompted widespread reflection and change toward social justice and racial inequities in almost all sectors of society – including the realm of scholarly publishing. The “Scholarly Kitchen,” blog of the Society for Scholarly Publishing, posted a notice of an “Antiracist Framework for Scholarly Publishing” on August 6, 2020 that serves as a guide to re-shape policies and practices in the production of scholarly literature.

I am delighted to share the outcome our initiative to examine and revise guidelines and practices for Advances in Nursing Science. As Editor, I established a workgroup of scholars of color who serve on the ANS Panel of Reviewers to take a deep dive into the journal’s “Information for Authors”. Together we created major anti-racist changes that have now gone into effect.

The changes that we made begin with a fundamental acknowledgement of the power of the published word to shape thought and power structures, and the responsibility of authors in situating their work within existing power structures:

Published scholarly works play a major role in shaping thought and power structures. We encourage authors to include a standpoint statement that describes your position relative to power relations of race, gender, and class. This is particularly important if your work involves disadvantaged populations or issues of social determinants of health and health equity. Examples include: 

  • “The authors Identify as white middle-class nurses. We have drawn on literature authored by scholars of color to inform the design, interpretations and conclusions reported in this article.”
  • “Our work arises from our experiences as able-bodied nurses, as well as our identities as mixed-race descendants of immigrants from Central and South American countries.”

The following is a new section that specifically addresses guidelines related to racism:

The ANS leadership – Editor, advisory board members, peer reviewers and Publisher recognize that published scholarly works are vehicles that can challenge systemic racism and intersecting forms of power inequities.  ANS expects an explicit antiracist stance as a means to provide scholarly resources to support antiracism in research, practice, education, administration, and policymaking. To this end, we offer the following guidelines:

  • Remain mindful of the many ways in which white privilege is embedded in scholarly writing, and engage in careful rereading of your work to shift away from these explicit and implied messages.  As an example, general “norms” are typically taken to reflect white experience only; this is revealed when the experience of people of color are taken to be “other” or “unusual” or worse yet “unhealthy” 
  • When race is included as a research variable or a theoretical concept, racism  must be named and integrated with other intersecting forms of oppression such as gender, sexuality, income, and religion.
  • If your work does include race,
    • Provide a rationale that clearly supports an antiracist stance.
    • Be careful not to explicitly or implicitly suggest a genetic interpretation.
    • Explicitly state the benefit that your work contributes on behalf of people of color.
  • Refrain from any content that explicitly or implicitly blames the victim or that stereotypes groups of people; situate health inequities clearly in the context of systemic processes that disadvantage people of color. 
  • Focus on unveiling dynamics that sustain harmful and discriminatory systems and beliefs, and on actions that can interrupt these structural dynamics.

We also added a new criterion on which all submissions are evaluated during the peer review process:

  • Acknowledgement of and challenges to power relations involving race, gender, class, ableism or any other systematic disadvantage.

Please visit the complete ANS Information for Authors to review these changes. We welcome your feedback, comments and questions! Please respond below!

Deep appreciation to the following team of ANS peer reviewers who developed these guidelines:

Helene Berman, RN, Ph.D, University of Western Ontario

Mary K. Canales, Ph.D., RN, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, PhD, RN (also member of Nursology.net management team)

Margaret Dexheimer Pharris, RN, PhD, FAAN, St. Catherine University (Emerita)

Bukola Oladunni Salami, RN, MN, PhD, University of Alberta

Holly Wei, PhD, RN, CPN, NEA-BC, East Caroline University

Jennifer Woo, Ph.D., CNM, WHNP, FACNM, Texas Woman’s University (also member of Nursology.net management team)

Foundations of Nursology Syllabus: Another New Resource on Nursology.net

Coauthor: Rosemary William Eustace, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC

We, along with all members of the nursology.net management team, are very pleased to offer another resource for nursology – the Foundations of Nursology syllabus. The syllabus is offered in conjunction with our teaching strategies resources (Fawcett, 2019) as well as other nursology website resources about nursing conceptual models, grand theories, middle-range theories, situation-specific theories, and philosophies.

The syllabus is offered to all interested nurse educators in academic and practice settings. Our intent in developing the syllabus was to provide a starting point for the teaching of nursology discipline-specific knowledge, with emphasis on nursology philosophies, conceptual models, and theories. We envision the syllabus as a key foundational tool for teaching and learning the essence of the philosophic, conceptual, theoretical, and application knowledge of our discipline as a foundation for transforming health care and health care delivery.

The syllabus has been designed to address the Future of Nursing documents and various nursology organizations initiatives as well as accreditation criteria for nursology programs (such as the National League for Nursing accreditation criteria for all programs and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing criteria for undergraduate and for graduate programs).

A sample 15 week outline is provided to introduce nursology students to the history and contemporary status of the discipline of nursology and the value and approaches to nursology theory-guided practice, quality improvement projects, and research. Depending on program level, students will use, translate, and/or develop new knowledge in coming to know and engage individuals, families, and communities in the praxis of nursology and wellbecoming, as well as coming to know healthcare systems. The syllabus provides course objectives, suggested methods of instruction, course delivery methods, examples of recommended readings and resources, examples of learning activities, and a sample topical/content outline and course schedule.

We invite readers to post any questions or comments they may have about the syllabus and to recommend development of resources for any other nursology theory-related teaching needs that need to be addressed.

Reference

Fawcett, J. (2019, August 20). How to teach nursology: A new resource on nursology.net. Blog. https://nursology.net/2019/08/20/how-to-teach-nursology-a-new-resource-on-nursology-net/

Call for Blog Submissions: Antiracism, Politics, and Nursing Knowledge

Nursology.net is issuing a call for blog submissions for an upcoming special issues series on the topics of antiracism and politics. At this critical time in history, we are committed to providing sentinel, contemporary, comprehensive, humanistic and authentic information to facilitate advancement of nursing science. We are calling for blog posts acknowledge antiracism and politics. We welcome you (students, scholars, practitioners, everyone!) to submit blogs on relevant topics of nursing knowledge, including nursing theory and philosophy, and the intersections of antiracism and politics. You are welcome to speak to one topic, or both as they are interconnected.

This call is open for Spring 2021, and notification will be made when our call is closed.

Read previous blogs on racism/antiracism on Nursology.net here.
Read previous blogs on politics on Nursology.net here.

For more information on how to submit a blog to Nursology.net please click here.
For information on how to write a blog, please click here.

So You Want To Be More Equitable, Just, and Inclusive?: A Live Webinar

See Details here!

Watch the first event here!
Read the blog post summarizing the first event here!

Nursing is an act of Justice.” – Canty and McMurray (2020)

Earlier this year, in light of the events surrounding the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and many others, the Nursology Theory Collective hosted a live event titled, “Equity, Justice, Inclusion, and the Future of Nursing.” At this event, Dr. Lucinda Canty and Patrick McMurray addressed the critical interrelated concepts of diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice for our discipline. The enduring homogeneity of nursing, Canty and McMurray noted, contributes to persistent inequity, injustice, and exclusion that exists today, both within the discipline and as it is practiced. Lamentably, many of our professional organizations address this in superficial ways, ways that may look good but fail to address the root causes of racism, sexism, homophobia, and more. This has the paradoxical effect of reinforcing hegemony even as these organizations purport to be about justice.

At the end of the event, many attendees raised questions about what we, as nurses, and we, as a discipline, could do to create a future for our discipline that is more equitable, just, and inclusive. In answer to these questions, we are happy to announce that we are going to host a part 2 to event on December 18th, 2020 at 1:00 Pacific Standard Time/4:00 Eastern Standard Time. To join this event, please register here in advance to save your seat. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

For our next event, we will continue the dialogue, recognizing that inequality, injustice, and exclusion remain systemic issues that we all play a part in. We will recommend tools that all nurses can do and share, no matter the setting, as individuals and within systems, in order to achieve our goal in making nursing and the world more equitable, just, and inclusive. 

If you have any questions you would like addressed at this event, please feel free to ask us on twitter @nursingtheoryco or email us at nursingtheorycollective@gmail.com.

We look forward to seeing you and continuing this important conversation on December 18th!

In solidarity,
The Nursology Theory Collective

Letter to the ANA

On September 26, 2020, the Nursology.net management team sent the following letter to the American Nursses Association, urging the organization to take a stand on the U.S. Presidential election candidates. We believe that given the dual pandemic of COVID-19 and racism, nursing’s strong voice of advocacy for the health of the nation must be heard. Here is the letter in its entirety:

September 26, 2020
Dr. Loressa Cole, ANA Enterprise CEO
Dr. Ernest J. Grant, President, ANA President
Dr. Debbie Hatmaker, Chief Nursing Officer, ANA Enterprise
American Nurses Association

Dear Drs. Cole, Grant and Hatmaker:


The Management Team of Nursology.net is writing to urge the American Nurses Association (ANA) to reverse its position against endorsing any candidate for President/Vice President in the 2020 election. We understand that the ANA reversed its previous policy to endorse presidential candidates based on the desire to “engage nurses in the voting process through providing accurate information and data and promoting nursing’s political advocacy role without alienating an entire contingency…acknowledging the reality of political polarization in this country” (ANA 2019 Membership Assembly Consideration of ANA’s Presidential Endorsement Process).

The recent draft of the document, Nursing’s Scope and Standards (2020), specifies nursing’s social contract with the public. The document includes nursing’s commitment to reject racism and promote equity and social justice for all. In addition, the document points to nursing’s accountability and responsibility to promote the health of all populations and to advocate for social and environmental justice, and access to high quality and equitable health care.

The proposed ANA Scope and Standards contradicts the ANA position against endorsing a presidential candidate if a particular candidate is a threat to equity, social justice, equitable healthcare and health for the population. While we respect that the Board made their decision thoughtfully, the current situation calls for a reconsideration based on the positions of the current administration that threaten public health. Scientific American, a journal who has never endorsed a candidate for president, has broken with their policy because of the dangerous anti-science views of the President

Today, the country needs to hear nursing’s voice related to this election from the ANA. We find ourselves in the midst of a perfect storm fueled by the mismanagement of a global pandemic, a health and environmental crisis from rampant fires, storms and floods attributed by scientists to climate change, and the public health crisis of systemic racism.

Many have referred to this election as the most consequential in recent history, certainly in our lifetimes. This is not the time for the nursing profession to sit out and fail to exercise our unified voice and moral authority. As the discipline focused on caring for the health and well-being of the people with an understanding of how the physical, social, political and economic environment influences health and well-being, and as the most trusted profession, the ANA must speak out against the policies of the current administration and endorse Joe Biden and Kamala Harris for President and Vice President. Please reconsider your position based on the actions taken by President Trump after your vote in 2019.

Here are a few reasons why we urge the ANA to reconsider and endorse the presidential ticket that is aligned with nursing values and actions and protects the public health:

  • The current administration’s lack of leadership to enact policies to stem the rising incidence of COVID-19 infections, including the President’s lack of providing timely information to the public that could have prevented thousands of infections and death
  • The current administration’s policies that have threatened accessibility to healthcare for millions of Americans by working to overturn the advances made through the ACA
  • The current administration’s position that denies human contributions to climate change and fails to support policies to abate its dangers.
  • The current administration’s lack of acknowledgement of the racial injustices experienced by people of color, especially Black people, at the hands of law enforcement.
  • The current administration’s policies of family separation at the border resulting in hundreds of children being placed in inhumane and dangerous conditions to their health and well-being.
  • The current administration’s lack of meaningful responsiveness to address the public health crisis of gun violence.

While the recommendations of the ANA’s Presidential Endorsement Process (2019) advocate for individual nurses to participate in election activities at the local, state and national levels and take advantage of educational opportunities to learn about the candidates that will inform their voting, nurses will look to the ANA for leadership, especially now. The ANA is the voice of the profession, and this is not the time for that voice to be silent. Without a unified position, the nursing profession is invisible, and the public trust in nursing’s commitment to protecting public health is compromised. Individual nurses can always vote their choice, but the unified voice of our profession is critical at this time in our history.

Please reverse your position and endorse the candidates that will advance policies that protect the health of the public. We cannot be silent. To be silent is to be complicit.

Thank you for your serious consideration of this request.

Respectfully,

Peggy L. Chinn, RN, PhD, DSc(Hon), FAAN peggychinn@gmail.com

Jessica Dillard-Wright, MA, MSN, CNM, RN jdillardwright@gmail.com

Rosemary William Eustace, PhD, RN, PHNA-BC

Jacqueline Fawcett, RN, PhD, ScD(hon), FAAN, ANEF

Jane Flanagan, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, AHN-BC, FNAP, FNI, FAAN

Dorothy Jones, RN, PhD, FAAN

Deborah Lindell, DNP, MSN, RN, CNE, ANEF, FAAN, Deborah.Lindell@gmail.com

Chloe Olivia Rose Littzen, MSN, RN, AE-C

Leslie H. Nicoll, PhD, RN, FAAN leslie@medesk.com

Adeline Falk-Rafael, PhD, RN, FAAN afalk-rafael@rogers.com

Marlaine C. Smith, RN, PhD, AHN-BC, HWNC-BC, FAAN

Marian Turkel, RN, PhD, NEA-BC, FAAN

Danny Willis, DNS, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN