Theory of Power as Knowing Participation in Change

Contributor: Jacqueline Fawcett
September 13, 2018

Author – Elizabeth A. M. Barrett, RN; PhD; FAAN

Year First Published – 1984

Major Concepts

Power-as-Freedom

  • Awareness
  • Choices
  • Freedom to act intentionally
  • Involvement in creating change

Power-as-Control

  • Awareness
  • Choices
  • Freedom to act intentionally
  • Involvement in creating change
Typology

A middle-range theory

Brief Description

“The theory of power as knowing participation in change was derived from Rogers’ science of unitary human beings. Following testing and research of the theory and measurement instrument, a practice methodology was developed and the health patterning practice model was initiated” (Barrett, 2010, p. 47). The theory focuses on power-as-freedom, in sharp contrast to power-as- control. Power-as-freedom comes from and is associated with participating knowingly in life changes. (Barrett, E. (2010). Power as knowing participation in change: What’s new and what’s next. Nursing Science Quarterly, 23, 47-54.)

Primary Sources

Barrett, E. A. M. (1984). An empirical investigation of Martha E. Rogers’ principle of helicy: The relationship of human field motion and power. Dissertation Abstracts International, 45, 615A.

Barrett, E. A. M. (1986). Investigation of the principle of helicy: The relationship of human field motion and power. In V. M. Malinski (Ed.), Exploration on Martha Rogers’ science of unitary human beings (pp. 173-188). Norwalk, CT: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

Barrett, E. A. M. (1989). A nursing theory of power for nursing practice: Derivation from Rogers’ paradigm. In J. Riehl (Ed.), Conceptual models for nursing practice (3rd ed., pp. 207-217). Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange.

Barrett, E. A. M. (1990). A measure of power as knowing participation in change. In O. Strickland & C. Waltz (Eds.), The measurement of nursing outcomes: Measuring client self-care and coping skills (Vol. 4, pp. 159-180). New York, NY: Springer.

Barrett, E. A. M. (2000). The theoretical matrix for a Rogerian nursing practice.
Theoria: Journal of Nursing Theory, 9(4), 3-7.

Barrett, E. A. M. (2003). A measure of power as knowing participation in change. In O. Strickland & C. Dilorio (Eds.), Measurement of nursing outcomes: Self care and coping (2nd ed., Vol. 3, pp. 21-39). New York, NY: Springer.

Barrett, E. (2010). Power as knowing participation in change: What’s new and what’s next. Nursing Science Quarterly, 23, 47-54.

Caroselli, C., & Barrett, E.A.M. (1998). A review of the power as knowing participation in change literature. Nursing Science Quarterly, 11, 9–16.

Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool (PKPCT)
Measures the person’s capacity to participate knowingly in change by means of semantic differential ratings of the concepts Awareness, Choices, Freedom to Act Intentionally, and Involvement in Creating Changes.

Barrett, E. A. M. (1984). An empirical investigation of Martha E. Rogers’ principle of helicy: The relationship of human field motion and power. Dissertation Abstracts International, 45, 615A.

Barrett, E. A. M. (1986). Investigation of the principle of helicy: The relationship of human field motion and power. In V. M. Malinski (Ed.), Exploration on Martha Rogers’ science of unitary human beings (pp. 173-188). Norwalk, CT: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

Barrett, E. A. M. (1990). A measure of power as knowing participation in change. In O. Strickland & C. Waltz (Eds.), The measurement of nursing outcomes: Measuring client self-care and coping skills (Vol. 4, pp. 159-180). New York, NY: Springer.

Watson, J., Barrett, E. A. M., Hastings-Tolsma, M., Johnston, L., & Gueldner, S. (1997). Measurement in Rogerian science: A review of selected instruments. In M. Madrid (Ed.), Patterns of Rogerian knowing (pp. 87–99). New York, NY: National League for Nursing Press.

Young, A., Taylor, S. G., & McLauglin-Renpenning, K. (2001). Connections: Nursing research, theory, and practice. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Author

Elizabeth A. M. Barrett

Education

BSN, MSN, MA, University of Evansville, Evansville, IN
PhD in nursing (1984), New York University, New York, NY

Experience

“More than 40 years of experience as a practitioner, educator, researcher, and administrator at universities in New York and Indiana” including a faculty position at Hunter College of City University of New York (now Professor Emerita) and a private practice as a Health Patterning Therapist. (Barrett, E. A. M. (2015). Barrett’s theory of power as knowing participation in change. In M. C. Smith & M. E. Parker (Eds.), Nursing theories and nursing practice (p. 495). Philadelphia, PA: F. A Davis.)