Nursing Philosophy Conference in August – and More!

We have added a new 2019 “Future Event” related to the development of nursing knowledge – the 13th Philosophy in the Nurse’s World & 23rd International Philosophy of Nursing Conference, to be held in Victoria, BC, Canada,  August 18-20, 2019.  In addition to the conference information, you will now find two important dates related to this conference in our “Due Dates” sidebar feature —

  • The abstract due date is February 28, 2019
  • Early bird registration ends on June 21, 2019

But that is not all! In addition to our regular blog posts at least every Tuesday, Nursology.net is constantly being updated with the addition of nursing theories, models, philosophies, landmark events, additions to recent past events, and exemplars. To help you keep up, we have added a sidebar “Recently Added” feature.  We hope you will visit Nursology.net often and check out the resources that are available related to past, present and future nursing knowledge development!

You can do it — contribute to the Nursology.net blog!

We hope everyone has noticed that Nursology.net has heaps of opportunities for people to  contribute – but did you know that you can contribute to our blog?  This blog is a multi-author blog (MAB), plus we welcome guest authors – which gives you an opportunity to become familiar with the process of blogging.  But wait a minute – I can already “hear” in my mind some of the push-back to this idea:  “I don’t have time to blog.” “Writing a blog does not contribute to the list of publications I need for promotion – I can’t waste time blogging.” “I need citations to my work and blog posts do not get cited.”  OK – I hear you!  But before you turn away from this idea, indulge me for a few moments and consider some good reasons you might begin in the world of blogging!

  • Blogs give you an opportunity to write in a different “voice” – a more relaxed tone that reaches people in ways that formal writing does not.  You can express your opinion, test out an idea to see if it “flies,” and ask your readers for specific feedback.
  • In fact, writing a blog post helps you develop the courage to use your voice — a challenge nurses often face.  My idea for this blog post was in part prompted by a post in an entirely different field – written by Marte C.W. Solheim from Norway, who tells a compelling story about finding the courage, as a PhD Student and then a recent graduate, to use her voice in the field of economics and political science.
  • Blog posts do not take away from the necessary work involved in your scholarship – instead the process of writing a blog post is like “thinking” time – it is an opportunity to reflect on points of particular importance to the ongoing development of your ideas.
  • Blog posts are being cited more and more often, and any social media mention of published work contributes to the “altmetric attention score” that is now displayed on published articles to indicate the amount and reach of the content in an author’s published works.  One of  the very important features that we are including throughout Nursology.net is the name of the contributor of content on any page (and on the blog), and the date the information was posted, in order that Nursology.net content can be accurately and adequately cited, with due credit to the appropriate author.
  • Your blog post provides readers an opportunity to give you feedback – much like a presentation at a conference – even if you do not invite it!  Feedback on your blog post is documented evidence of how your ideas are being received.  And sometimes they contribute to the development of your ideas.
  • Writing a blog post is not nearly as hard as you might think!  Blog posts are short, to the point and can include any kind of commentary or opinion that you want to include.  Of course if you draw on another source for some of your ideas (as I have done in this post) – there are no style manuals or formating requirements – as long as you find a way to point accurately to your sources, you are good to go!
  • Blog posts have the potential to reach an audience that you would never reach in a published article — nursology colleagues who might never see your published articles,  important scholars in other fields, and most important, the public whose interests your work is intended to serve. As Patrick Dunleavy pointed out on a recent LSE Impact blog, having invested hours and hours of time on your work, why not spend a couple of hours crafting an accessible blog post that has the potential to reach a broad audience?
  • Writing for blogs is rapidly becoming a new form of scholarly communication that draws on many of the ideals of the open-access model – blogs are also referred to as short-form digital publishing.  They are intended to broadcast your ideas as widely as possible.
  • You do not have to trudge through the long and arduous process of journal or book publishing, especially if you blog on your own blog!  Blogs are open to “public review” – a form of review that is not replacing the very valuable process of anonymous peer review, but is increasingly valued as a way to determine the worth of ideas in a public forum. If someone takes issue with your ideas, in all likelihood you will find out about it in short order.  This is a huge benefit — you cannot adequately address what you do not know is “out there” and blog readers are one of your best sources to explore the landscape of opinion related to your ideas.

The nursology.net  multi-authored blog (MAB)  team members are committed to writing regularly for the blog in order to have a new post at least weekly, and to provide a diversity of perspective, style, and content!  Some of our bloggers write their posts directly, using the handy “add a post” feature on wordpress.com (where our site is hosted). Others  send me the content for their blog either by email or using our handy blog submission form (also a sub-menu item under “Blog Home” on our main menu!). You can see who is on our team in the right sidebar, showing everyone’s name and a link to their most recent posts.

As the lead blogger,  I  make sure the links and other details are in order, and schedule each post 2 to 4 weeks in advance. If your post is time-sensitive, we will post it at whatever date is optimal. If I have any questions about something that is not clear, or if I detect something that needs to be double-checked for accuracy, either I, or someone else on our management team will be in touch to make sure your post is the best it can be. We might do a bit of light editing to correct spelling or obvious grammatical errors, but we do not aim for perfection!  What we do NOT do is revise or change your own message – we want your post to reflect your own ideas, your own voice.  We welcome controversial content, especially when you include sound rationales for your perspective and welcome open discussion.  The only thing we will intervene with is anything that is disrespectful or harmful, or “flaming” of other individuals or groups.

So this is our invitation to you!!  Use this opportunity to try your hand at blogging!  Let me know about your idea and we will assist you in every way possible to become a published short-form digital author (or if you prefer, a published blogger)!

 

 

The Experience of Nursology.net

Just before the holidays, my long-time friend, Sue Huether, said to me after spending some time on Nursology.net – “Peggy, this is not just a website – it’s an experience!” Her comment inspired our new site tagline because in fact, Nursology.net has indeed turned out to be an experience!

Even for those of us building the site, it has been an experience. We have all been involved in the work of developing and teaching nursing ideas for many decades, but the experience of the website has led us to new appreciation for the depth, the breadth and the significance of our discipline.

We invite you to experience Nursology.net often! Spend some time clicking around in every section, following links to information all over the web! Follow our blog, and visit the site often because we will have new content just about every week. Most important, we have built in ways for you to participate in every section! Not sure how to get involved, just let us know!

Scholarships for the National Nursing Ethics Conference

Scholarships Available for National Nursing Ethics Conference (NNEC) March 20-22, 2019 

NNEC wishes to thank Ann Hamric, PhD, RN, FAAN, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation for their support of nursing ethics education.

  • The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is offering up to $3,000 per person scholarship to attend the Sixth National Nursing Ethics Conference. Visit the AACN Continuing Professional Development Scholarships page to learn more.  You must be a member of AACN to apply. For questions, please e-mail scholarshp@aacn.org
  • Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation Conference Scholarship –  National Nursing Ethics Conference
    This single conference scholarship opportunity will be provided to a qualified applicant by the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation and include a full conference registration of $515 plus a reimbursable travel stipend of up to $500 to attend the National Nursing Ethics Conference March 21-22, 2019 at the Luskin Conference Center, UCLA. Please review eligibility requirements at https://advancingexpertcare.org/NNEC.  We welcome questions at info@hpnf.org.
  • Ann Hamric Graduate Student NNEC Scholarship Award
    Three scholarships have been provided to support graduate students who have demonstrated an interest in ethics. Travel funds of $500 will be available to each student to attend the National Nursing Ethics Conference.  Please submit a short bio and a brief description of your interest in healthcare ethics (no more than 150 words) to EthicsCenter@mednet.ucla.edu with subject heading “SCHOLARSHIP”
    Eligible students must reside outside of California.

Update on early nursing theory think tanks facilitated by Margaret Newman

On November 13th, I posted information about early nursing theory think tanks organized by Margaret Newman!  A few days ago, I happened to be looking for something entirely unrelated in the early issues of Advances in Nursing Science and discovered a little notice announcing the second nursing theory think tank!   I have added the link to the announcement as an addendum to the November post, but also believe it is important to add here the information in this notice for its historic significance.

The ANS notice confirms that the purpose of the  first nursing theory think tank in October 1978 was to “bring together persons involved in theory development in nursing to explore areas of needed theory development and to devise a means whereby continuing dialogue between theorists can occur” (page 105).

The October 1978 think tank participants were:

Margaret Newman, facilitator (The Pennsylvania State University)
June Brody (Herbert Lehman College),
Carol Deets (Indian University),
Ellen Egan (University of Minnesota),
Rosemary Ellis (Case Western Reserve University),
Jacqueline Fawcett (University of Pennsylvania),
Joyce Fitzpatrick (Wayne State University),
Beverly Hall (University of Washington),
Margaret Hardy (Boston University),
Joan Rinehart (The Pennsylvania State University),
Elizabeth See (Wayne State University)
Marilyn Sime (University of Minnesota),
Ardis Swanson (New York University),
Gertrude Torres (Wright State University), and
Lorraine Walker (The University of Texas).

Values and Ethics: Foundations of Nursology.net

There are sections of many websites that are seldom visited – the mission, goals, or “About” pages that set forth the purposes that shape the content, focus and direction of the site.  Nursology.net is no exception, other than the fact that many first-time visitors may be intrigued by the name of this site and might explore the “About” menu item to learn more!

We have recently added to our “About” page a section we believe to be central to this project – our “Values and Ethics.”  These statements of value are not just words – they are the principles that guide every decision and that shape the content of this site.  Notice that central to what we value is your involvement!  Nursology.net belongs to every member of our discipline, and we welcome you to respond to any part of this site, including our statement of values and ethics!  Here is what we have posted – let us know your thoughts and ideas!

Values and Ethics

The development and maintenance of this site are guided by the following values:

  • We take every step possible to assure accuracy of content on this site by
    • Assuring review of content by members of the management team prior to activation of pages and posts.
    • Securing review and approval from any nurses who are central to the content presented (e.g. authors, key nurses involved), if those individuals are available.
    • Inviting corrections and updates from viewers who have the best information available.
    • Welcoming feedback, discussion and critique from viewers where there are issues of controversy or different points of view.
  • We assure accountability and transparency of the content on this site by:
    • Showing the name or names of the contributors who have provided the information displayed on specific pages
    • Providing the dates when content was initially posted and revised.
    • Providing links or references to sources from which content is derived, or is quoted.
  • We welcome submissions of content for each section of the website and have provided submission forms tailored to each section.  These forms are found on main pages of each section.  In addition, we welcome:
  • We will respond promptly to all communications, including requests to correct, change or remove any content that violates our commitment to  be accountable and transparent in using content from other sources.

Nursology think tanks, anyone?

Addendum
Notice in ANS 1:3 (April 1979) of 2nd NTTT gathering

What if we had a host of small nursology think tanks happening all over the world?  Sound impossible?  No, it is not impossible, and we have an historial model from which to build!  As Jacqueline Fawcett observes in her reflections below, this Nursology blog can be viewed as a think tank of sorts.  And, we can also envision ways for face-to-face nursology think tanks to happen! If you are inspired by this idea, don’t wait for someone else to do it – invite a few friends and colleagues, and do it!   Here is the model as Jacqui and I experienced it:

Dr. Margaret Newman

In 1978, Margaret Newman initiated a very simple idea with great influence – she called for a few of her colleagues around the country to gather at a designated airport hotel and spend a couple of days in deep discussion about the development of nursing theory.  She called the gathering a “Nursing Theory Think Tank (NTTT)”   There was no agenda, no note-taking, and no expectation for outcomes.  Everyone who was invited to participate each year made their own hotel reservation at a designated hotel near an airport hub, and Margaret arranged with the hotel to provide a small conference room for two days free of charge.  There were about a dozen people invited each year – often a handful of people who had attended in the past, and typically 2 or 3 who had not attended before and were doing significant work in the realm of nursing theory or philosophy (now of course known as nursology!). Margaret’s own book Health as Expanding Consciousness was in production at the time of the first gathering, and published early in 1979.

I attended about 2 or 3 of the gatherings – and the photo shown below is my only record of anything that happened one of the years I attended!  I know Margaret was there (she always was!), and since she is not in the photograph I am guessing that she might have taken the photo!  As you can see from the photo, this event happened in an era when nurses generally “dressed up” for such an occasion, but the fact is that the gatherings were very informal, and often peppered with humor, story-telling and sharing of life experiences.  There was always someone quick to remind the group that we were under no obligation to be “productive” – but of course, significant “productive” things happened as a result of these gatherings. Since we were all as busy as we could be with our very productive careers, we more than welcomed the opportunity to have this kind of discussion with no pressure – not even the pressure of taking notes!

My experience of these discussions had a lasting influence, affirming some of the ideas I was working on, challenging me to think at a deeper level about specific aspects of my work, and prompting me to take my ideas to a deeper level of understanding, But equally important, I had the opportunity to hear from other nursologists, learn about their perspectives, and come to appreciate not only who they were as individuals, but the importance of their ideas. So I have always carried with me the importance of this kind of free-flowing opportunity to just talk, challenge one another and deepen our understandings of our ideas and of one another as individuals.

It was at the NTTT that Jacqueline Fawcett and I first met in person – probably in about 1981 or 2.  When I founded Advances in Nursing Science  in  1978, someone suggested that Jacqui was a young scholar who would be a wonderful addition to the review panel – and she has served faithfully in this capacity ever since! While we have known one another all these years, serving together on the management team for Nursology.net is our first opportunity to work closely together.  Here are Jacqui’s reflections of the NTTT:

My notes indicate that that the Nursing Theory Think Tank (NTTT) began in
1978 and ended in 1988. My recall of the decade of existence of the NTTT
are as follows.

The NTTT was begun by Dr. Margaret A. Newman. The first meeting, in 1978,
was at State College, PA, when Margaret was on the faculty at Pennsylvania
State University. I was exceptionally honored to be invited to join the NTTT in 1978. The members, including those who were invited and those who joined later,
included Margaret, of course, as well as Ellen Egan (Margaret’s former NYU
classmate), Ardis Swanson (Margaret’s former NYU faculty colleague), June
Brodie and me (former students in Margaret’s NYU theory development course),
Beverly Hall, Lorraine Walker, Kay Avant, Elizabeth See, Peggy Chinn, Afaf
Meleis, and Barbara Carper. We met approximately once each year, typically
for a weekend in the fall season, at a hotel near an airport.

The NTTT discussions focused on the current and desired future state of
nursing knowledge. Most discussions were informal and wide-ranging; others
were more formal discussions, based on papers presented by NTTT members. I
presented a paper for discussion at the NTTT meeting in Dallas, TX, in
September 1982, which was published along with a critique by June Brody in
1984: Fawcett, J. (1984). The metaparadigm of nursing: Present status and
future refinements. *Image: The Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 16*,
84‑87; Brodie, J. N. (1984). A response to Dr. J. Fawcett’s paper: “The
metaparadigm of nursing: Present status and future refinements. Image: *The
Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 16,* 87-89.

I presented another paper for discussion at the NTTT meeting in Austin, TX,
in October 1986, which was published in 1989: Fawcett, J. (1989). Spouses’
experiences during pregnancy and the postpartum: A program of research and
theory develop­ment. *Image. The Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 21,*
149-152.

Although the NTTT ended in 1988, many of the members have continued to
contribute to the development of nursology. To the extent that the blog
posts on nursology.net might be considered a contemporary NTTT, all
nursologists are invited to submit blogs and publish their ideas about all
matters nursology in journal articles, book chapters, and books.

Addendum – added to this post on December 2, 2018 – I discovered a notice published in ANS 1:3 (April, 1979) describing the first NTTT in October, 1978, announcing the second think tank planned for March 1979, and inviting interested nursologists to contact Margaret Newman.

“Seated, L to R, Peggy Chinn, Beverly Hall, Jacqueline Fawcett, Elizabeth See
Standing, L to R, Afaf Meleis, Kay Avant, Lorraine Walker, Ellen Egan, Ardis Swanson”

Confronting Cultural Noise Pollution

Much earlier in my career a group of colleagues and I conducted a survey published in the American Journal of Nursing that addressed friendship in nursing*.  We were motivated to confront the message that nurses are their own worst enemies, and not friends. The results of the survey affirmed that although the message persists, and sometimes accurately describes relationships and interactions, there is ample evidence that nurses are more often than not our own best supporters and friends. I call these kinds of repeated negative messages cultural noise pollution that obscure the realities of the more accurate and complete situation – messages that obscure what is real and what is possible.

We created Nursology.net with a  similar motivation to confront the often repeated message that nursing theory is irrelevant, not necessary, or too abstract to be useful in practice.  These messages obscure the realities of the vital importance of nursing knowledge in the context of systems that serve to address the healthcare needs of our time.  They interrupt serious consideration, discussion and thought concerning who we are as nurses, what we are really all about, and why we persist in our quest to improve our practice. Failing to recognize the value of our own discipline’s knowledge, we fall prey to serving the interests of others, and neglect our own interests.

My favorite pithy definition of theory is this – theory is a vision.  Theory provides a view of concrete realities that makes it possible to mentally construct all sorts of dimensions that are not obvious to our limited perception of a situation in the moment.  It provides ways to understand how a particular “thing” comes about, what it means, what might happen next,  how the trajectory of a situation might unfold, and how human actions might change that trajectory.   In the practice of nursing, this is precisely what we are all about – we take a close look at a situation that presents a health challenge, we set about to understand what is going on beneath the surface, we examine evidence related to the situation, and we chart a course of action that might move the situation in a way that would not otherwise be possible.  People in other healthcare disciplines are doing much the same thing, but we have a nursing lens through which we as nurses view the situation.  Our  lens determines what we deem to be important in the evolution of the situation, and shapes the sensibilities we bring to the actions we take.  Our lens derives from nursology – the knowledge of the discipline.

If you take even a brief tour of Nursology.net, you will soon see that nursing theories, models and philosophies represent a coherent message focused on visions of health and well-being in the face of complex, sometimes tragic,  health challenges. You will also find a vast diversity of lenses that give a particular focus on this central message.  Some of the lenses give us a vision that is a lofty “30-thousand foot altitude” view. Some of the lenses focus in more closely on particular aspects of health challenges. There is no “right or wrong,” “better or worse.” Each lens simply brings about a different vision. Just as a camera can bring a different tone, hue or filter to see a single image in different ways, our nursing theories open possibilities and alternatives that would never be possible if we did not have the various lenses through which to view the situations we encounter. Taken together, these theories, models, philosophies form an ever-expanding nursology. Our theories, models and philosophies open possibilities for practice that can make a huge difference in the lives of real people.

We have an amazing, vast and rich heritage of nursing knowledge – and we are nowhere near done with the task!  Our vision for Nursology.net is to document and honor the serious knowledge-work that has been accomplished in the past, draw on this foundation, and inspire new directions that are yet unimagined!  We hope nurses everywhere, regardless of how or where you practice as a nurse, will join us in this journey, and add your voice to help shape what is possible! And importantly, we invite you to join us in confronting the negative, self-destructive effects of various forms of cultural noise pollution that cloud our vision!

*Friendship Study references

Chinn, P. L., Wheeler, C. E., Roy, A., Berrey, E. R., & Madsen, C. (1988). Friends on friendship. The American journal of nursing, 88, 1094–1096.

Chinn, P. L., Wheeler, C. E., Roy, A., & Mathier, E. (1987). Just between friends: AJN friendship survey. The American journal of nursing, 87, 1456–1458.

Scholarship for research or clinical practice project in process based in Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings

The Society of Rogerian Scholars (SRS) offers funding for research or clinical practice project in process based in Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings.  Up to three awards of $1000 each are given each year, and the application deadline is April 1!

Go to the Society of Rogerian Scholars website for more details – the award criteria, application  requirements, and the award process.  We are adding the application due date to the “Due Dates” list in the Nursology.net sidebar, with a link to  the SRS website details!

Theory-guided Practice Exemplar: United States Air Force Professional Caring Practice Using Ray’s Theory of Bureaucratic Caring

The first exemplar of theory-guided practice posted on Nursology.net was the United States Air Force Professional Caring Practice Using Ray’s Theory of Bureaucratic Caring.  In the process of preparing the information for posting, Dr. Marilyn “Dee” Ray shared how this came to be!  Here is her story:

It was a great honor to have the USAF, Nurse Corps accept my theory as their framework for

Photo credit: Lifetouch Church Directories – directories@lifetouch .com.

the new Interprofessional Person Centered Caring Model. The actual development came after Colonel Marcia Potter chose the Bureaucratic Caring Theory (BCT) for her doctoral (DNP) research on nurse and staff efficacy and economic outcomes regarding patients with diabetes. She completed her DNP in 2015. Her work improved USAF clinical practice and economic outcomes to the sum of over 2 million dollars.

At the same time, Lt General Dorothy Hogg, Surgeon General and Chief of the Air Force Nurse Corps wanted to develop a theory-guided person centered caring model for implementation in the Nurse Corps. She was the Deputy Surgeon General then but is now the first nurse and woman chosen to the rank of Lieutenant General (3 star) and Surgeon General of the US Air Force . She was recognized for her creativity, intellect, caring nature, and ability to motivate professionals toward health care collaboration and dynamic policy change. Colonel Potter recommended my theory to be the one that the executive should review to see if it would be the best to choose for development in the whole Nurse Corps for theory-guided practice because she had positive clinical and economic outcomes from her research in primary care. Colonel Potter called me on the phone after she found my information in the Society of Retired USAF nurses. So that call began our relationship and my reconnection to the executive of the USAF.

We had many discussions and a number of iterations of the model until the one posted on Nursology.net was selected. Colonel Potter has implemented Bureaucratic Caring Theory-Guided practice and research in all those areas you see on the website. It astounds me in terms of all she accomplishes.  All this has taken place since 2015.

There is now a new initiative that facilitates the development of person-centered caring in the USAF, NC called the C21 or Centers for Clinical Inquiry under the leadership of Brigadier General Robert Marks and Colonel Deedra Zabokrtsky. This initiative is planned in key locations around the Air Force where there are nurse researchers and librarians to support inquiries from the field looking for the best, most relevant research in the literature as it relates to nursing practice (evidence-based/informed practice), as well as engaging nurse researchers in different USAF sites directly in response to queries about improving nursing practice.

At the installation to Surgeon General and Lt. General in Washington, DC last June, Dorothy Hogg gave me this amazing recognition highlighting my theory as the theory that was selected to respond to the new health care initiative to focus on person centered and improve care in the USAF. As you can imagine, I was so deeply humbled and honored. I served in the USAF Nurse Corps for 32 years and served our country in many roles as flight nurse, clinician, educator, administrator, command nurse, consultant, and researcher in aerospace and organizational nursing and health care, veteran, and Colonel Retired, and now in this new role as a nursing theorist. What can I say, but a sincere thank you to so many people, including colleagues like [the Nursology.Net developers] who are role models and have encouraged and guided me throughout the years.

Kindest regards and caring thoughts,
Dee

Follow-up note –
I forgot to mention that I was invited to present the BCT guided interprofessional Person-Centered Caring Model and work in the USAF to the European Society for Person Centered Healthcare in London in September, 2016 where I was awarded an Honorary Distinguished Fellowship of the ESPCH. That is another great honor.